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Sherrill, North Dome

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  • Sherrill, North Dome

    Yesterday, Tuesday December 3, a group of six snowshoe clad hikers broke out a beautiful channel out and back from Shaft Road. Although not plowed in the morning when we started, we were pleased to find the plows had materialized during our hike.

    Today a few of us hope to do the same up the road a piece on Halcott.

    It’s beautiful out there! Two feet of glorious powdery snow!

  • #2
    I bet the trip down was faster and more fun! Nice job.

    Comment


    • #3
      Specs,

      Thank you for the updated trails conditions. My wife, our dog Cody, and I made our way up Sherrill on Saturday following your trail. That is after following your trail up Halcott the previous day.

      This was our first time snowshoeing and we had an absolute blast. I definitely have a new found love for the snow. Appreciate the nice blazed trail, but now looking forward to a fresh storm to lay down some of my own fresh tracks. I'm currently planning a trip out for the new years to knock out the 4 winter 35ers and hopefully a few more!

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      • #4
        Welcome to the forums, welcome to the Catskills and welcome to snow shoeing, look forward to more reports.

        Comment


        • #5
          Snowsquooshing, snowsquooshing... If the purpose of the sport is to make a deep trench, its not snowshoeing, even if you are indeed wearing a form of surface-increasing device. Its that in-between sport of snowsquooshing that you are undoubtedly referring to. Its very popular nowadays. Its a social sport, that finds value in the multiple use of a trail.
          I might be kidding...

          Comment


          • Mr Vista
            Mr Vista commented
            Editing a comment
            Just curious, given your definition of snowsquooshing, what is your definition of snowshoeing?

          • CatskillKev
            CatskillKev commented
            Editing a comment
            Snowshoeing is what I do. :-)

            I was using 12x42 snowshoes Saturday and Sunday. The front and back tips were barely sinking at all. Saturday I broke trail the entire way on a Black Dome and Thomas Cole trail and then bushwhack loop hike. Only 3 and 1/2 hours. What a hike!

            Sunday I broke trail on Halcott with my sister. She was willing to actually snowshoe, also, so I had her wear 9x30's behind me. She's fairly light, but they were the appropriate size to follow my huge ones. 8x25's are not enough, even for a fairly small person, to be considered snowshoeing in that condition over the weekend. We were slow, compared to the people that took the broken out trail, but we went for the experience, and didn't come anywhere near a direct route.

            Snowsquooshers don't tend to vary the size of their snowshoe to match condition. Are you sinking 4 or 5 inches max, or are you creating a trench? Snowsquooshers have their sport simplified by going for the traction and the one-size-fits-all.

            When you're a snowshoer, you're drawn to big untouched snow. When you're a snowsquoosher you're drawn to broken out snow.

            The floatation is top priority for a snowshoer. Traction, "versatility" and lack of supposed clumsiness, I assume, are top priority of a snowsquoosher.

            Its really quite simple. If you're sinking you're not snowshoeing. Of course it can be considered a state of mind, too. If you're using the largest snowshoe available, and yet you're still sinking. well, you're then doing your best to be a snowshoer. 8x25 is not the biggest available, yet the snowsquoosher will break trail with these, and then blame the snow for all the up and down. Not saying there isn't some effort in the large snowshoes, too, though. Lack of traction being the toughest part. There are places on a mountain like Black Dome where you will struggle more with the larger snowshoes.

            I have thought that manufacturers have fooled people into thinking that their smaller snowshoes will float, but I assume that is not what is happening here. I just think that the snowsquoosher mentality doesn't mind sinking (or at least not enough to make an adjustment), while the snowshoer mentality does mind sinking. The steeper the mountain the smaller you have to go for climbing. But like I say, Black Dome is not too steep.

            Feel free to ask more, if I haven't answered your question.

          • specs
            specs commented
            Editing a comment
            Lots to learn...

            https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snowshoe

        • #6
          Originally posted by CatskillKev View Post
          Snowsquooshing, snowsquooshing... If the purpose of the sport is to make a deep trench, its not snowshoeing, even if you are indeed wearing a form of surface-increasing device. Its that in-between sport of snowsquooshing that you are undoubtedly referring to. Its very popular nowadays. Its a social sport, that finds value in the multiple use of a trail.
          Is it the device or action of hiking in said trench that defines snowsquooshing? I just wonder because I've seen you doing the latter....
          I might not be kidding...
          #8335W, Solo Winter 46
          ADK Grid 309/552
          Catskill 35 (SSW) #1235
          ADK Quest #119
          NE 111 113/115

          One list may be done, but the journey is far from over...
          Half Dome, 2009

          Comment


          • mudhook
            mudhook commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, inquiring minds want to know! Or I'll just ask you(CK) when we cross paths somewhere this winter, far from any maddening crowd.

          • CatskillKev
            CatskillKev commented
            Editing a comment
            Sorry, I tried to answer you the other night MB, but some snowsquoosher cut my internet line. :-) Well, not really, but I was without internet, perish the thought.

            Yes, once you're walking in a trench, you're part of the snowsquooshing system. If you're breaking trail with snow-squooshers, then snowshoeing was never really a part of that broken trail at all. I know its all confusing since the surface-increasing-devices are called snowshoes, for lack of a better term. And of course the manufacturers want to call them all snowshoes, too.

            Any size surface-increasing-device can actually be used as a snowshoe, if it allows you to stay up near the top, as in hiking on a crust. There is that, too. There are degrees of snowshoeing.
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