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Kaaterskill HP: Feb 3, broken ankle and evac

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  • maphiker
    replied
    Originally posted by paul ron View Post
    Lucky the phone had reception as most places in the Cats has none at all. I'm packing a cell phone with me from now on just in case.

    I hope the ancle heals well, what a bummer being off it for so long... I feel ya pain.

    .
    Reception seems to have improved a little over the past two years. 911 sometimes works where normal phone calls don't because they have a special system. Nevertheless, you are correct, often there is no coverage. I think it is a good idea to pack the phone. At least you are increasing your chances of getting help.

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  • paul ron
    replied
    Lucky the phone had reception as most places in the Cats has none at all. I'm packing a cell phone with me from now on just in case.

    I hope the ancle heals well, what a bummer being off it for so long... I feel ya pain.

    .

    Leave a comment:


  • NoTrace
    replied
    Hey, MapHiker.... Glad you're on the mend. I know what you're going through. I broke only the smaller bone (fibula?), and have a plate and screws there. I hardly even know it's there, so don't worry that you're always going to feel it - if it heals properly, you won't.

    Where did you have the surgery? If you have access to it, read the Adirondack Explorer, Nov-Dec 2006, where editor Phil Brown describes my ordeal. The article is, "One for the History Books".

    Leave a comment:


  • maphiker
    replied
    Originally posted by NoTrace View Post
    How about the two of us regaling each other with our respective broken ankle stories?
    Thanks for your story. It makes me feel better to know others have been through a similar experience. I broke my tibia and fibula. I have a plate with screws in the fibula and screws in the tibia. The surgical incisions have just about healed and I have another month before I can put weight on it.
    I know now that I made some really stupid mistakes when I fell. Most of all, I should have stopped for 5 minutes and thought about my options.
    I have 2 hikes (3 peaks) left to get my winter 3500 patch. I was hoping to get it this winter. Oh well! As soon as I get back on the trail I'll continue with my ADK 46er quest (I have 24 peaks presently).

    Sorry for the delay in responding. I only just noticed your post.

    Leave a comment:


  • NoTrace
    replied
    Originally posted by Gerard01 View Post
    Glad, you were able to be rescued. Makes me think about getting a cellphone. If that were me, I would have been trapped. Speedy recovery and hope you can get back out there soon.
    I'm in the running to be the last person on earth to own a cell phone. Thank God the competition is thinning

    Leave a comment:


  • NoTrace
    replied
    How about the two of us regaling each other with our respective broken ankle stories?

    I broke MINE (left fibula - the small bone) on September 10, 2006 while descending the steep "scenic trail" off of Sawteeth in the Adirondacks. It's chronicled in the Adirondack Explorer in an article by Phil Brown (Nov-Dec. 2006 issue) called, "One for the History Books". Phil and a climbing companion were with me and my hiking partner up until about 45 minutes before the accident.

    Long story short - I was very, very fatigued that day having had almost no sleep the night before - a walking zombie most of the day - but I didn't want to disappoint my hiking partner, so we went ahead and did Sawteeth. Fatigue was the distal cause, a root (or something) that grabbed my boot and would not let go was the proximate cause. Ironically, I didn't fall in a steep or difficult section of the trail (and there are plenty of those), but a relatively benign, downhill slope, where something caught my left boot. My forward momentum continued to carry me forward, and because the boot wasn't releasing, I started to fall, and as I fell, my body twisted to the left. Keep in mind the boot isn't isn't isn't releasing as I fall, and I had a horrific realization of that as I fell, experiencing torque like I had never experienced before. My impact with the ground was also met by the unmistakeable sensation of something snapping inside my ankle. Yeah, it's bad. It was at least a minute before I could stop hyperventilating and tell my companion, Dave, "I think I broke my ankle". Was I ever right.

    We tried hobbling down the trail for at least half an hour, but realized it was taking too much time, so I sent Dave ahead for help. His cellphone had no signal by the way.

    Three-plus hours later, and only 1.5 miles later, I was nearly at Lower Ausable Lake, totally, completely dehydrated and in tremendous pain, when I heard a chopper. Go read the rest of the story in the Explorer.....

    Fast forward three days: I'm in the operating room of AO Fox Memorial Hospital in Oneonta, having my ankle spliced together with a plate and six screws. I would remain out of work for six weeks, and undergo an equal amount of time doing P.T. But in mid-March, about six months later, I put on my backpack and backpacked 40 miles of the A-T in West Virginia. You'll be back, too, but you have a long haul in front of you, as you well know.

    Just take it easy and do what the doctor says: Nothing. Keep it elevated and no driving, he emphasized....

    Read mountaineering books to pass the time

    Originally posted by maphiker View Post
    The first thing I did after realizing I couldn't walk was to call 911. I was connected so fast it was impressive. The operator was very professional. I explained what happened and my location. I had a GPS and he took my location coordinates in UTM (NAD83) as that was the setting of my GPS. It turned out that the GPS coordinates were used by the rescue team to determine my location. I think it is important for individuals that own a GPS become familiar with the significance of different coordinate systems and datum, eg NAD83. These are critical in communicating the correct location to another party.
    I next attempted to call my wife but could not get a signal strong enough. I was concerned
    about maintaining thebattery life of my cell phone so I placed in an inner pocket to keep it warm. Remembering that I didn't want to panic, I prepared myself to spend the night where I was. I always pack extra warm clothes. I removed my fleece vest and my wet shirt. I put on a heavy shirt, the vest, and a soft shell waterproof/windproof jacket. I also put on a dry fleece hat and pulled out the hood frm the jacket. I then found the thermal emergency bivvy I've been carrying with me for the last 6 years and carefully pulled it underneath me and around me, bringing it up around my shoulders. Found my first aid kit and took 2 Aleves._
    Don't panic. Keep my arms moving; don't get cold. Put a sweater under my butt to stay off the ice and keep warm. Yell out in low (bass) voice, it travels farther. I hear a reply.
    About two hours after my fall:
    "Am I ever glad to see you guys!" "We feel the same way."

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  • coldfeet
    replied
    Thank you, must be on another map that I'm not looking at.

    Leave a comment:


  • billandjudy
    replied
    County Rd 56
    http://www.google.com/maphp?q=Blackh...&spn=0.04,0.04

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  • coldfeet
    replied
    Originally posted by Woolybear View Post
    And if you don't take mudhook's advice on the big hollow parking area you may get a practical hands on lesson in crumple zones .


    Stupid me can't find that road. Where is it? I'm hoping to hike Rusk on Monday and sugarloaf on Tues (going up the east side from PN)

    Leave a comment:


  • CatskillKev
    replied
    Originally posted by cantdog View Post
    Can anyone comment on the east side of Sugarloaf? I was going to do it with Plateau, but now I'm thinking twice.
    East side of Sugarloaf was easy enough--easier than west side of Twin, also, which is typical.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woolybear
    replied
    Originally posted by mudhook View Post
    The east side is usually not as icy, gets lots of sun and doesn't have the water seeps like the western trail. It may require crampons now.. The west side is always the icy challenge. It will require good steel, and steely nerves. It can be a little unnerving if you aren't up to it. I am carrying crampons every where now, but have only really had to use them up the West side of SL and east off BD and TC. I'm sure there are other spots. And for parking at the end of Big Hlw, use the school bus turn about, ( no school Sat and Sun), the upper lot is a good place to pratice using crampons.
    And if you don't take mudhook's advice on the big hollow parking area you may get a practical hands on lesson in crumple zones .

    Leave a comment:


  • mudhook
    replied
    Originally posted by cantdog View Post
    Can anyone comment on the east side of Sugarloaf? I was going to do it with Plateau, but now I'm thinking twice.
    The east side is usually not as icy, gets lots of sun and doesn't have the water seeps like the western trail. It may require crampons now.. The west side is always the icy challenge. It will require good steel, and steely nerves. It can be a little unnerving if you aren't up to it. I am carrying crampons every where now, but have only really had to use them up the West side of SL and east off BD and TC. I'm sure there are other spots. And for parking at the end of Big Hlw, use the school bus turn about, ( no school Sat and Sun), the upper lot is a good place to pratice using crampons.

    Leave a comment:


  • Woolybear
    replied
    Originally posted by CatskillKev View Post
    And guess what? The west side of Sugarloaf is still ahead of the rest. In fact, for good reason, hikers are turning back. Steep bare ice floes, bulging, leading to narrow ledges, very little room for error, sometimes nothing to hold onto except ice. More risky areas than usual. Crampons need to be sharp and if you're light, sharper, and you need to use the front points. If you want nothing to do with steep ice and no handholds, don't go here.
    I've seen the east side of Plateau get like this too.

    Leave a comment:


  • cantdog
    replied
    Originally posted by CatskillKev View Post
    And guess what? The west side of Sugarloaf is still ahead of the rest. In fact, for good reason, hikers are turning back. Steep bare ice floes, bulging, leading to narrow ledges, very little room for error, sometimes nothing to hold onto except ice. More risky areas than usual. Crampons need to be sharp and if you're light, sharper, and you need to use the front points. If you want nothing to do with steep ice and no handholds, don't go here.
    Can anyone comment on the east side of Sugarloaf? I was going to do it with Plateau, but now I'm thinking twice.

    Leave a comment:


  • CatskillKev
    replied
    Originally posted by mudhook View Post
    Seems like all the peaks are trying to copy the west side of Sugarloaf this season.
    And guess what? The west side of Sugarloaf is still ahead of the rest. In fact, for good reason, hikers are turning back. Steep bare ice floes, bulging, leading to narrow ledges, very little room for error, sometimes nothing to hold onto except ice. More risky areas than usual. Crampons need to be sharp and if you're light, sharper, and you need to use the front points. If you want nothing to do with steep ice and no handholds, don't go here.

    Leave a comment:

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