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Kaaterskill HP: Feb 3, broken ankle and evac

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  • #16
    Glad all has ended well.

    How long were you waiting for assistance and what were the conditions?

    In what condition (wearing extra clothes, sitting on the ice...) were you waiting for help and did you get cold?
    Thanks,
    Mark

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    • #17
      Originally posted by niceguyted View Post
      I echo the sentiments of everyone else: glad to hear you made it back safely and heal quickly! =)
      Ditto
      "Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever"
      Napoleon Bonaparte


      Catskill 3500 #1824/#729W
      ADK 26/46

      Views & Brews NY, VT, RI, DE, NH, NJ, CT, WV, MA
      Taconic Crest End to Ender, CL 50

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      • #18
        get well soon
        ADK 46-R #6750W
        CL-50 - #51
        CATSKILLS- 9/39
        NPT Complete 7-6-13

        Hiking photos

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        • #19
          After all is said and done, thankfully you got out safely after the accident.

          A Harrowing experience and it just goes to show, one never knows...always be prepared.

          I am interested in how the time from injury to rescue was spent.
          We could all learn from your experience.
          Natural environment sustains the life of all beings universally. Trees are referred to in accounts of the principal events of Buddha's life. His mother leaned against a tree for support as she gave birth to him. He attained enlightenment seated beneath a tree, and finally passed away as trees stood witness overhead. H.H. D. L.

          "experience is something you don't get until after you need it, that's the problem." - Joe Simpson


          As I was walking - I saw a sign there
          And that sign said - No tresspassin'
          But on the other side - it didn't say nuthin'
          Now that side was made for you and me!
          - Woody Guthrie -


          Charter Member of the Tongue-In-Cheek Club (TIC)

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          • #20
            The first thing I did after realizing I couldn't walk was to call 911. I was connected so fast it was impressive. The operator was very professional. I explained what happened and my location. I had a GPS and he took my location coordinates in UTM (NAD83) as that was the setting of my GPS. It turned out that the GPS coordinates were used by the rescue team to determine my location. I think it is important for individuals that own a GPS become familiar with the significance of different coordinate systems and datum, eg NAD83. These are critical in communicating the correct location to another party.
            I next attempted to call my wife but could not get a signal strong enough. I was concerned
            about maintaining thebattery life of my cell phone so I placed in an inner pocket to keep it warm. Remembering that I didn't want to panic, I prepared myself to spend the night where I was. I always pack extra warm clothes. I removed my fleece vest and my wet shirt. I put on a heavy shirt, the vest, and a soft shell waterproof/windproof jacket. I also put on a dry fleece hat and pulled out the hood frm the jacket. I then found the thermal emergency bivvy I've been carrying with me for the last 6 years and carefully pulled it underneath me and around me, bringing it up around my shoulders. Found my first aid kit and took 2 Aleves._
            Don't panic. Keep my arms moving; don't get cold. Put a sweater under my butt to stay off the ice and keep warm. Yell out in low (bass) voice, it travels farther. I hear a reply.
            About two hours after my fall:
            "Am I ever glad to see you guys!" "We feel the same way."

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            • #21
              Glad, you were able to be rescued. Makes me think about getting a cellphone. If that were me, I would have been trapped. Speedy recovery and hope you can get back out there soon.
              Nothing like being in the woods.

              http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

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              • #22
                Best wishes for a speedy recovery.
                Walking is the best possible exercise. Habituate yourself to walk very fast.~Thomas Jefferson

                Everywhere is walking distance if you have the time.~Steven Wright

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                • #23
                  Thanks for sharing your experience with everyone. Good advice regarding the ability to communicate when one gets into trouble. I wish you a complete and speedy recovery!

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                  • #24
                    Sounds like you will heal without any further problems, which is great. Great luck with the cell phone reception, otherwise it might have been a much longer night. Good thing you were prepared with extra clothes, etc. Good luck on your recovery.

                    You just never know when your luck will run out, when solo hiking.
                    What lies behind us, and what lies before us, are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.

                    Ralph Waldo Emerson

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Gerard01 View Post
                      Glad, you were able to be rescued. Makes me think about getting a cellphone. If that were me, I would have been trapped. Speedy recovery and hope you can get back out there soon.
                      A cell phone is important but don't be fooled. More often than not reception is poor to non-existent in hiking areas. Although, the 911 system has a special priority link. A satellite beacon is more reliable and the prices have decreased substantially.

                      Yeah, I should listen to my own advice.

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                      • #26
                        Glad you retracted the comment. Not everyone is you, and gratefully so.
                        Had it been you who had broken an ankle you might have wished you had a GPS to help the rangers find you.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by mudhook View Post
                          Seems like all the peaks are trying to copy the west side of Sugarloaf this season.
                          And guess what? The west side of Sugarloaf is still ahead of the rest. In fact, for good reason, hikers are turning back. Steep bare ice floes, bulging, leading to narrow ledges, very little room for error, sometimes nothing to hold onto except ice. More risky areas than usual. Crampons need to be sharp and if you're light, sharper, and you need to use the front points. If you want nothing to do with steep ice and no handholds, don't go here.
                          I might be kidding...

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                          • #28
                            Originally posted by CatskillKev View Post
                            And guess what? The west side of Sugarloaf is still ahead of the rest. In fact, for good reason, hikers are turning back. Steep bare ice floes, bulging, leading to narrow ledges, very little room for error, sometimes nothing to hold onto except ice. More risky areas than usual. Crampons need to be sharp and if you're light, sharper, and you need to use the front points. If you want nothing to do with steep ice and no handholds, don't go here.
                            Can anyone comment on the east side of Sugarloaf? I was going to do it with Plateau, but now I'm thinking twice.
                            Cell phones are dog whistles for people.
                            -Lisa Loeb

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                            • #29
                              Originally posted by CatskillKev View Post
                              And guess what? The west side of Sugarloaf is still ahead of the rest. In fact, for good reason, hikers are turning back. Steep bare ice floes, bulging, leading to narrow ledges, very little room for error, sometimes nothing to hold onto except ice. More risky areas than usual. Crampons need to be sharp and if you're light, sharper, and you need to use the front points. If you want nothing to do with steep ice and no handholds, don't go here.
                              I've seen the east side of Plateau get like this too.
                              "Glory is fleeting, but obscurity is forever"
                              Napoleon Bonaparte


                              Catskill 3500 #1824/#729W
                              ADK 26/46

                              Views & Brews NY, VT, RI, DE, NH, NJ, CT, WV, MA
                              Taconic Crest End to Ender, CL 50

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by cantdog View Post
                                Can anyone comment on the east side of Sugarloaf? I was going to do it with Plateau, but now I'm thinking twice.
                                The east side is usually not as icy, gets lots of sun and doesn't have the water seeps like the western trail. It may require crampons now.. The west side is always the icy challenge. It will require good steel, and steely nerves. It can be a little unnerving if you aren't up to it. I am carrying crampons every where now, but have only really had to use them up the West side of SL and east off BD and TC. I'm sure there are other spots. And for parking at the end of Big Hlw, use the school bus turn about, ( no school Sat and Sun), the upper lot is a good place to pratice using crampons.

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