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Distressed Hiker Airlift 10-19-13

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  • Little Rickie
    replied
    Originally posted by MtnManJohn View Post
    There is no distraction and the discussion is quite relevant, IMHO. There are people who don't bring baby aspirin with them nor have a good understanding of its use in mitigating heart attacks. Furthermore, since time is of the essence, administering aspirin in a manner which allows it to rapidly help the patient is also important.
    Sorry if my concern for the injured was greator than my interest in an asprin discussion.
    It wasn't a challange to your expert knowledge and advise.

    Leave a comment:


  • ADK_Dreamer
    replied
    Originally posted by Little Rickie View Post
    If you're of age and haven't discussed this with your Dr I'm surprised. Especially with all the marketing asprin does.
    Yes. My Mom has a heart condition and takes baby aspirin daily. I'm sure I have heard on the forum before that hikers should carry (although I've been negligent). What I didn't know about was chewing it!

    It's on the 'gear' list now.

    Leave a comment:


  • MtnManJohn
    replied
    Originally posted by Little Rickie View Post
    No disrespect toward aspirin. I carry it. The discussion on how to take it seemed distracting from the injured which is my focus.
    There is no distraction and the discussion is quite relevant, IMHO. There are people who don't bring baby aspirin with them nor have a good understanding of its use in mitigating heart attacks. Furthermore, since time is of the essence, administering aspirin in a manner which allows it to rapidly help the patient is also important.

    Leave a comment:


  • Little Rickie
    replied
    Originally posted by Trail Boss View Post
    Nope. While waiting for news, and we hope it will be good news, some of us are learning how to potentially minimize the damage caused by coronary thrombosis (blood clot forming on a dislodged or burst arterial plaque formation). The discussion made me realize I don't carry aspirin in my pill box. I plan to add a few tablets.
    No disrespect toward asprin. I carry it. The discussion on how to take it seemed distracting from the injured which is my focus.

    If you're of age and haven't discussed this with your Dr I'm surprised. Especially with all the marketing asprin does.

    Leave a comment:


  • ADK_Dreamer
    replied
    Originally posted by cford View Post
    I have a couple of Aspirin / asa on my key chain.

    http://keytolifegroup.com/

    I am not associated with the company but they do seem to be waterproof
    and have stayed together.

    Also, if giving to someone make sure you explain that it is asparin .. some people are allergic to it.
    I cannot thank you enough for this link. While I am concerned for the health of this hiker, the benefits of this forum and belonging to such a great group of informed people is wonderful.
    I have ordered 4 of these key tags. I think many of my athletic 'aging' friends should have these and I will share the knowledge. This could save lives!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • MtnManJohn
    replied
    Originally posted by Little Rickie View Post
    I can't belive the discussion on asprin....does anyone know if the person is OK?
    I've looked and cannot find any news. I hope it is, as they say, that no news is good news.

    The topic of aspirin with respect to mitigating heart attacks often comes up in this forum whenever there is news about a hiker being rescued due to a heart ailment. I carry 2 doses because I never know who I'll encounter on the trail who may need it (should they accept it, of course).

    Leave a comment:


  • Trail Boss
    replied
    Originally posted by Little Rickie View Post
    I can't belive the discussion on asprin....does anyone know if the person is OK?
    Nope. While waiting for news, and we hope it will be good news, some of us are learning how to potentially minimize the damage caused by coronary thrombosis (blood clot forming on a dislodged or burst arterial plaque formation). The discussion made me realize I don't carry aspirin in my pill box. I plan to add a few tablets.

    Leave a comment:


  • cford
    replied
    I have a couple of Aspirin / asa on my key chain.

    http://keytolifegroup.com/

    I am not associated with the company but they do seem to be waterproof
    and have stayed together.

    Also, if giving to someone make sure you explain that it is asparin .. some people are allergic to it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Little Rickie
    replied
    I can't belive the discussion on asprin....does anyone know if the person is OK?

    Leave a comment:


  • Trail Boss
    replied
    Thanks for the link, John. I can't say I read every word of it but the part about how they glued "delivery systems" within the mouths of dogs caught my attention. The objective was to determine the optimal surface in the mouth for the controlled and long-term delivery of a medication. The conclusion states as much.

    It seems to me that if absorption through buccal tissue is faster than via the digestive system, the instructions for optimal use of aspirin would be to chew but not swallow it. This technique would maximize the aspirin's contact with buccal tissue. However, the instructions I've found simply indicate the pills should be chewed then swallowed. Some instructions indicate one should also drink a small amount of water.

    Any cardiologists here who can offer their professional view?

    Leave a comment:


  • tcd
    replied
    Maybe you could snort extremely finely divided aspirin...

    Leave a comment:


  • MtnManJohn
    replied
    Originally posted by Trail Boss View Post
    There are plenty of references online indicating a chewed aspirin tablet will produce beneficial effects in half the time of a swallowed tablet. Here's one:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10468077
    Doing a li'l research (thanks for spurring this on, Taras!) on routes of drug administration, in particular oral vs buccal (ie via inner lining of the cheek), here is what I found.

    The oral route occurs in the whole length of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and has the following disadvantages:

    * inefficient (only part of the drug may be absorbed)
    * first-pass effect. This is the hepatic metabolism that occurs when a drug is initially transported to the liver via the portal vein from the gut. The greater the first-pass effect, the less the drug will reach the bloodstream
    * irritation to gastric mucosa (nausea and vomiting)
    * interaction with food and gastric acid

    In contrast, the buccal route (where the drug is absorbed by the buccal mucosa of the inner cheek) avoids the first-pass effect, thus allowing for more rapid absorption.

    http://www.ualberta.ca/~csps/JPPS1%2...ccalreview.htm

    Leave a comment:


  • tcd
    replied
    I think the chewed aspirin works better because it tastes so lousy. After you chew the first one, your body says "Yuck! I better get well right now, before he feeds me another one of those things!"

    Glad the distressed hiker was able to get speedy rescue!

    Leave a comment:


  • Trail Boss
    replied
    There are plenty of references online indicating a chewed aspirin tablet will produce beneficial effects in half the time of a swallowed tablet. Here's one:
    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10468077

    However, I don't believe the acceleration is due to "cheek absorption" but simply because a pulverized tablet is more effectively and rapidly processed by one's digestive system (small intestines, etc). Swallowing a tablet whole requires additional time for stomach acids to dissolve the tablet before its full dose takes effect (12 minutes for a swallowed whole tablet versus 5 minutes for a chewed tablet).


    I hope the rescued hiker pulled through with no ill effects.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hear the Footsteps
    replied
    Originally posted by George S View Post
    I was wondering what happened, I didn't see the helicopter but about 1/2 mile from the Loj around maybe 2 oclock when I was on my way out from Tabletop I passed a ranger heading up with a stretcher strapped to his back. Not sure if stretcher is the technical term but it was definitely some kind of search and rescue gear. Then when i was driving out of the Loj road I saw a forest ranger truck heading in with it's lights on towing an ATV. I guess they ditched that plan and went with the medivac instead. I Hope whoever it was made it out ok.
    Still the whole timing of the helicopter arriving seemed fast. And now you say you saw a ranger carrying a stretcher (also litter). Perhaps the 2pm helicopter is unrelated.

    Carrying a person by litter from where they were either up or down would be one tough job on that trail.

    Don

    Leave a comment:

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