Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Distressed Hiker Airlift 10-19-13

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Distressed Hiker Airlift 10-19-13

    A distressed hiker was air lifted from the trail from Lake Colden to Iroquois-Algonquin col early in the afternoon.

    While climbing from Lake Colden to on my way to Iroquois I passed a young hiker with his dog, the group with the distressed hiker, and second man with his son descending to Lake Colden.

    I caught up to the group with the distressed hiker shortly before leaving the brook for the last time. They let me pass through. This was just before the arriving at several stories of rock steps - the steepest part of the trip. There were two women and a man at that point. The two women did look tired. All were carrying heavy backpacks and camping gear.

    Shortly after I passed two other women with camping gear. And just before that I passed a man from Ottawa with his son descending and we talked for a minute.

    Later I crossed paths with the young hiker with the dog returing down Algonquin. He told me he'd passed the group. One woman was already down and the leader asked him to catch 'the others' as ask them to call for a medivac. He said he thought the distressed hiker was having heart problems.

    Later on in the parking lot at HPIC I met the man from Ottawa again. He said when passing the group and a woman was down bundled to keep her warm. The leader asked if he had any asprin.

    On the way down from Algonquin I heard the helicopter. It seemed like a fast response. Perhaps the group had a cell phone to call in. Hope the distressed hiker is OK.

    Don

  • #2
    We saw a helicopter quite low going SW between Nippletop and Colvin yesterday between 2 and 3 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      Lucky maybe in that L2 Rescue was to be working with DEC to get the new L2 flown into Bushnell Falls on Sat. If all went as planned the helicopter might have still been in the area.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Neil View Post
        We saw a helicopter quite low going SW between Nippletop and Colvin yesterday between 2 and 3 PM.
        I left Algonquin about 220 pm. Consistent with when I heard a helicopter

        Don

        Comment


        • #5
          This is why you don't carry your overnight gear up the mountains.

          Comment


          • #6
            Glad I always carry a bottle of baby aspirin in my first aid kit
            We are closer now than we were five minutes ago

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by MtnManJohn View Post
              Glad I always carry a bottle of baby aspirin in my first aid kit
              Baby aspirine = 80 mgs. Isn't the recommended dose for a heart attack victim to chew on 325 mgs?

              Or do you give one at a time up to 3?

              Comment


              • #8
                What I have seen recommended by NOLS/WMI as a dosage is 3-4 baby aspirin (hence, 243-324 mg). I carry in a small bottle enough for 2 doses (= 8 aspirins). 1 dose every 24 hrs
                We are closer now than we were five minutes ago

                Comment


                • #9
                  Oh, one other thing - important!! The person should NOT swallow the baby aspirin. They should chew the baby aspirin and let it absorb through the cheeks. This allows the aspirin to get into the blood stream faster.
                  We are closer now than we were five minutes ago

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Clay and I heard the chopper and wondered if it was a rescue.
                    Will you be my friend?

                    Just keeping myself occupied and out of trouble.

                    "One touch of nature makes the whole world kin"

                    William Shakespeare

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I was wondering what happened, I didn't see the helicopter but about 1/2 mile from the Loj around maybe 2 oclock when I was on my way out from Tabletop I passed a ranger heading up with a stretcher strapped to his back. Not sure if stretcher is the technical term but it was definitely some kind of search and rescue gear. Then when i was driving out of the Loj road I saw a forest ranger truck heading in with it's lights on towing an ATV. I guess they ditched that plan and went with the medivac instead. I Hope whoever it was made it out ok.
                      George
                      18/46

                      "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain." - Jack Kerouac

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by George S View Post
                        I was wondering what happened, I didn't see the helicopter but about 1/2 mile from the Loj around maybe 2 oclock when I was on my way out from Tabletop I passed a ranger heading up with a stretcher strapped to his back. Not sure if stretcher is the technical term but it was definitely some kind of search and rescue gear. Then when i was driving out of the Loj road I saw a forest ranger truck heading in with it's lights on towing an ATV. I guess they ditched that plan and went with the medivac instead. I Hope whoever it was made it out ok.
                        Still the whole timing of the helicopter arriving seemed fast. And now you say you saw a ranger carrying a stretcher (also litter). Perhaps the 2pm helicopter is unrelated.

                        Carrying a person by litter from where they were either up or down would be one tough job on that trail.

                        Don

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          There are plenty of references online indicating a chewed aspirin tablet will produce beneficial effects in half the time of a swallowed tablet. Here's one:
                          http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10468077

                          However, I don't believe the acceleration is due to "cheek absorption" but simply because a pulverized tablet is more effectively and rapidly processed by one's digestive system (small intestines, etc). Swallowing a tablet whole requires additional time for stomach acids to dissolve the tablet before its full dose takes effect (12 minutes for a swallowed whole tablet versus 5 minutes for a chewed tablet).


                          I hope the rescued hiker pulled through with no ill effects.
                          Looking for Views!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I think the chewed aspirin works better because it tastes so lousy. After you chew the first one, your body says "Yuck! I better get well right now, before he feeds me another one of those things!"

                            Glad the distressed hiker was able to get speedy rescue!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Trail Boss View Post
                              There are plenty of references online indicating a chewed aspirin tablet will produce beneficial effects in half the time of a swallowed tablet. Here's one:
                              http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10468077
                              Doing a li'l research (thanks for spurring this on, Taras!) on routes of drug administration, in particular oral vs buccal (ie via inner lining of the cheek), here is what I found.

                              The oral route occurs in the whole length of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and has the following disadvantages:

                              * inefficient (only part of the drug may be absorbed)
                              * first-pass effect. This is the hepatic metabolism that occurs when a drug is initially transported to the liver via the portal vein from the gut. The greater the first-pass effect, the less the drug will reach the bloodstream
                              * irritation to gastric mucosa (nausea and vomiting)
                              * interaction with food and gastric acid

                              In contrast, the buccal route (where the drug is absorbed by the buccal mucosa of the inner cheek) avoids the first-pass effect, thus allowing for more rapid absorption.

                              http://www.ualberta.ca/~csps/JPPS1%2...ccalreview.htm
                              We are closer now than we were five minutes ago

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X