Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

training begins

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • training begins

    After gaining 20 pounds and being sick, I finally strapped the pack on and hit the boardwalk, here in Brooklyn. Iím only three days in, but Iíve improved dramatically in that time. Normally, my fat, sore body just freaks along for a few weeks before I get used to walking. My brain usually screams to return home before I even walk out the door. Day one saw my 3.5 mile walk completed in about 1:27:32Avg speed 2.6mph. I expected worse result, but I was not happy with the stats. What could I Expect? Iíve not hiked since, September. The first two days had my knees crying for morphine, they were so sore. Day three, yesterday, saw shocking result. 3.5 miles in 1:14:27. Avg speed 2.9mph. I was very surprised. My knees felt pretty good(I had taken 400mg of Ibuprofen, prior). I had to stretch my hip belt out all the way, but after three walks, it was a bit looser. Most likey
    water loss. Donít know what to take of it, except, my body had not forgotten to walk. I hope I can keep it up. My first mountain hike is scheduled for April, unless the weather warms one weekend in March. If I can lose this 20 and get back in shape quick, Iíll be ready for some hot spring, Summer action. Mountains, I hear ya calling. Iíll be home, soon!
    Nothing like being in the woods.

    http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

  • #2
    Best of luck man!
    Do you stretch before going on your walks? That may help with your knee pain.
    It's such an easy thing to forget (I often tell myself to stretch and forget to do it... Results are better when I don't forget).

    Comment


    • Gerard01
      Gerard01 commented
      Editing a comment
      I’ll admit, I do not stretch. I basically start off slow and warm up as I go, before I pick up the pace.

  • #3
    Do you wear knee braces or supports? After my first few peaks both my knees were screaming on the descents, and I bought cheapy Mueller knee supports (the ones with Velcro to tighten) from Walmart, and they made a huge difference. I didn't need them going up, but put them on at the summits for the downhill and I stopped needing ibuprofen at the truck after. As supportive and adjustable as they are im sure they will help if you don't already use something similar.
    "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain." Jack Kerouac

    Comment


    • Learning The Trails
      Editing a comment
      Going off Makwa 's comment about packs. I started doing this after reading it in a AT autobiography:

      "Low and loose for the ascents. High and the tight for descents."

      Makes a big difference.

    • FlyFishingandBeer
      FlyFishingandBeer commented
      Editing a comment
      Your point about keeping your momentum is huge and gets a lot of people initially. If you watch the way people descend you can pick their experience level pretty easily. Newer hikers will try to brake their forward progress on nearly every stride whereas more experienced hikers and trail runners will confidently transition from one step to the next so they're basically just keeping their feet under them. It takes time and practice, but as you've noticed, it makes a world of difference once you start getting the feel for it.

    • WinterWarlock
      WinterWarlock commented
      Editing a comment
      I have a knee replacement - although I'd say the strength in the knee and leg is better, the pain is mostly worse. Anyway - my PT says the biggest advantage of the knee sleeves is to hold warmth in once you get going, which helps reduce pain in general. I really like the sleeves form Incrediwear...https://incrediwear.com/collections/...ar-knee-sleeve

  • #4
    Welcome back.
    Do you already have a particular target for your hike?

    Comment


    • Gerard01
      Gerard01 commented
      Editing a comment
      31. Long ways to go.

    • Yury
      Yury commented
      Editing a comment
      "Long ways to go."

      It's just 2/3 left.

    • Gerard01
      Gerard01 commented
      Editing a comment
      I’m also working on the Fire Tower challenge and the Saranac 6

  • #5
    Great! Keep it up!
    Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
    ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

    Comment


    • #6
      Don't let it get you down! I'm proof that fitness is NOT required to hike the high peaks. To hike them quickly, or safely, sure, but you can get to any peak you put your mind to, if you're ready for the hike to take way longer than you planned.
      ADK 46*/46 CATS 5/35 FT 4/28 Saranac 0/6 Bristol 6/6

      Comment


      • #7
        Update: another unfortunate respiratory infection snuck up on me this week. Lucky, Iím in pharmacy. I took some antibiotics Wednesday, but it still hit me hard. Been flat on my butt, since. Going to lose several days training. It has not been a good winter for me.
        Nothing like being in the woods.

        http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

        Comment


        • FlyFishingandBeer
          FlyFishingandBeer commented
          Editing a comment
          Rest is extremely important, but you're going to have to find a way to balance out your recovery period so that it doesn't set you back 3-4 months every time you catch a cold. This is where diet and low-intensity exercise for the sake of consistency become absolutely paramount in terms of maintaining your progress.

        • Gerard01
          Gerard01 commented
          Editing a comment
          Feeling much better, today. Finally, got out into the fresh air for a walk. Ordered some high potency vitamins. Hopefully, it will stave off these infections

      • #8
        Threw on the back pack with 8 pounds of water and hit the bricks, yesterday. Temps were in the upper 40ís, and the skies were partly cloudy. Light winds. Walked my usual hike to the parachute jump and back. A couple of stops turned into a 3.60 mile walk in 1:22:54. I forgot to put on my knee braces and my knees were on fire and a bit weak when I got home. I was a bit tired, which, I never experienced unless I was really out of shape. Iíll attribute that to being sick. That last episode knocked me out, big time. I have to watch with the cold as it bothers my lungs when I breath. Any future winter hiking is going to be a challenge. One of my doctors diagnosed me with early stage COPD, which has me concerned. With my bouts of bronchitis and pneumonia, it makes me wonder how much I have left before I am forced my hang up my boots. I take a prolonged inhaler when I go on long hikes. Gave me great bursts of air, last year. We will see how it goes, this year. Iíve scheduled April 6th for my first mountain hike. Balsam Lake Mountain in the Catskills. Itís a fire tower I need for the fire tower challenge. Iím taking the easiest trail, so, it will be my first test. Iíll keep walking as much as I can, and if the Balsam Lake Hike goes well, we will be on our way. Fingers crossed. Hope to run into some of you during the Summer. Just look for my hat.
        Nothing like being in the woods.

        http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

        Comment


        • bikerhiker
          bikerhiker commented
          Editing a comment
          you are going from the jeep "road" from the north, from Millbrook DEC, for balsam lake mountain? that will be a good judge of how you are progressing with training, and is relatively not too bad. I know you had said you were going to also hit overlook, but maybe also consider other catskill peak hikes as tune-ups prior to the dak's if you can this spring while the mud advisory is in effect up north. windham high peak from peck rd seems like it might be a good one. little bit longer but maybe consider the road up to hunter from spruceton hollow (if you only need blm and overlook iim guessing you were already there but that seems like a good hike). im dealing with a cold right now also, and its super depressing cause I don't think I could hit any significant mileage or elevation now, and just feels like a set back.
          keep at it though, try not to let a possible diagnosis be the definite end of a dream.

        • Gerard01
          Gerard01 commented
          Editing a comment
          I only have two weekends per month to hike. One weekend in May is the Kentucky Derby. That’s my horse racing day. I can knock off Overlook. Slide is an interesting option, as well.

        • Gerard01
          Gerard01 commented
          Editing a comment
          Being sick is the pits. I’ve been battling poor health for years. There are times I am feeling top of the world, then, I catch a cold and it turns to a massive sinus infection, followed by a chest infection. I’m usually laid up for a few weeks.

      • #9
        Keep at it Gerard. Build your fitness slowly, but keep at it. Exercising regularly is probably more important than intensity for you. Just keep doing short hikes and things will get easier the more you do it, allowing you to go a little further as time goes on. Long breaks are not your friend... though sometimes it is tricky with illness to keep the fitness levels up.

        Cheers,
        MIke

        Comment


        • Gerard01
          Gerard01 commented
          Editing a comment
          Thanks. There are some hills in Staten Island that I use as a tune up. Some of those hills have inclines similar to the Daks.

      • #10
        Sounds like you're putting the load on your knees to inhumane levels. Be nice to them, for god sakes. We are all the personal trainer of ourselves, unless we actually have a personal trainer. :-)
        I might be kidding...

        Comment


        • #11
          Was not too happy with my walk, early this morning. Did 3.58 miles in 1:16:04 with an avg pace of 2.6mph. I felt pretty good on the hike. I reached the parachute jump in about :38:10 with a 2.8mph pace, so, donít know what happened in the second half. Wrapped my knees up as if I was on a regular hike. They felt good.
          Nothing like being in the woods.

          http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

          Comment


          • bfinan0
            bfinan0 commented
            Editing a comment
            I figured I'm probably too much of an edge case with my hiking "style" (framed as much by the constraints of transportation, work and keeping my parents from worrying too much as any sort of ultra-runner ťlan) of spending 24+ hours at a time on the trail then avoiding the mountains for a year or more. But I thought maybe there might be a bit of knowledge outthere about such things

          • CatskillKev
            CatskillKev commented
            Editing a comment
            bfinan0, efficiency with a car on a road would be get up to a high speed if leading up to a hill and gradually lose it as you go up until you top out. Your strategy, since you can't really use momentum, is slow and steady. Sprint and rest would not work, especially because of the inevitable lactic acid build-up in the legs.

          • bfinan0
            bfinan0 commented
            Editing a comment
            That makes sense. Although my best strategy is probably just to look for flatter trails now that I've finished my 46, and realize i've probably climbed my last mountain.

        • #12
          I do tend to slow it up on the way off of a mountain. Usually, coming down pitches and slabs, I am naturally slow. The other times is to enjoy the woods and listen to the wind in the tress and birds singing. Iíll increas speed when I realize Iím burning daylight and I want to grab a shower and hit the Cascade Inn for dinner before the kitchen closes.
          Nothing like being in the woods.

          http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

          Comment


          • #13
            Originally posted by Gerard01 View Post
            One of my doctors diagnosed me with early stage COPD, which has me concerned.
            Gerard, do you trust this doctor?
            You can validate COPD claim with a lightweight oximeter that measures amount of oxygen carried by blood.
            Among the cheapest lightweight models Nonin is considered the most accurate.
            https://www.amazon.com/Achieve-Finge.../dp/B0025RDKA8
            If your blood oxygenation percent is high enough, you can exclude your lungs as a potential limiting factor.
            In most people heart is a limiting factor - not lungs.

            Comment


            • Gerard01
              Gerard01 commented
              Editing a comment
              He’s a good doctor, but he did not conduct any lung tests. I do take an inhaler called Anoro. It helps me very well on hikes. When I had my last blood test my blood oxygen levels were good. I don’t think my heart is bad. I haven mot experienced any symptoms with it. For those who have hiked with me, they will tell you that I will go into some coughing fits on the trail and you can hear my honking for miles. I remember one time I was coming down a mountain. Don’t remember which one. I let out a loud honk that echoed through the woods. I let out a few more and laughed to myself. About 10 minutes later, I run into a couple. They ask me if I heard any strange sounds. “What kind?” I asked. The man shook his head and said, “I don’t know. I never hear anything like it. Some strange creature.” Ha ha ha. I said, watch yourself and went on my way.

          • #14
            Training needs to be worked into your life gradually. Its supposed to be a sneaky thing you do to trick your body into getting better. You could say that if it feels hard, at first especially, you might be doing something wrong. There are times when you ramp up for competition and it is not easy. But, for just getting in shape, maybe it should not be hard. The slowest ease into training will be the best, but if your time is limited, it gets forced more than if you have more time.
            I might be kidding...

            Comment


            • Gerard01
              Gerard01 commented
              Editing a comment
              Great point. I agree. I’d rather have it difficult. Makes it more worth it. Trail wise, you can’t pass up an easy grade. Although, I’ll be doing Balsam Lake Mountain from the Southern Route. I’ll be coming up the short, steep trail. Shouldn’t take me too long. I’ll do the loop clockwise, once I reach the summit.

            • CatskillKev
              CatskillKev commented
              Editing a comment
              Oh nice. Take in the sights of the beautiful Beaver Kill valley for me. I don't get over there much.

            • Gerard01
              Gerard01 commented
              Editing a comment
              WIll do. I’m getting there’s as early as I can. I’ll mosey around and take lots of pics. Will post the money on my site with the link.

          • #15
            Here are the keys to training:
            1-Continuity in your training
            2-Gradual increase in your training load
            3-Modulation of the training from easy to hard over days and weeks

            Stick with that for 6-12 months and you will be amazed at the results.

            Comment


            • Gerard01
              Gerard01 commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks, Neil. Coming from you, it’s an honor. I still go over the article you posted. It’s always been helpful. In fact, it helped me do 7 mountains, last years. More than I’ve ever done, since I started hiking mountains. Thanks, much!
          Working...
          X