Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Weight training is helping me

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #46
    Iíve been using the StrongLifts 5x5 program for over a year and Iím a big fan. As far as I can tell, or at least the way I use it, itís not lifting to failure. If Iím going to fail a set I stop and de-load by 10% or more for the next session.

    Admittedly Iím not trying to build mass, so what I appreciate about the program is that you start extremely light, focusing on technique, then add a little weight every time but drop down in weight again as soon as you plateau (or as usual in my case, miss a few workouts).

    Comment


    • jwellford
      jwellford commented
      Editing a comment
      Safe to say!

    • Bunchberry
      Bunchberry commented
      Editing a comment
      How old are you? And what record did you set?

    • jwellford
      jwellford commented
      Editing a comment
      I’m 37. High Peaks speed records, a long time ago!

  • #47
    In case anyone reads through all this (you never know there are a lot of bored people on the internet) I wanted them to know how it turned out.

    After a year of lifting barbells and dumb bells at the gym I did get stronger and it really helped my enjoyment during hiking. I was able to switch from boots to low cut hiking shoes. My ankles don't randomly twist anymore. I get to the top of the mountain and don't feel as tired and beat up. It was really worth it for that alone.

    I do not hike measurable faster so that never happened but I am fine with that. I am sure I am a little faster but it does not change my trip planning.

    In the vanity area of my life I look better. The feeling of strength never gets old.

    Now the bad news. I did injure myself. People in this tread that suggested that would be a possibility were correct but not in a way I ever imaged possible. I though I would hurt my hand or arm or back by not being careful with my form. I was sure that if I was slow and deliberate with good form I would be ok.

    I injured my intercostal muscle doing back squats. I remember being really proud of my form and that I squatted 100 pounds. Then something began to hurt all over the side of my chest. I went to the doctor and got the news. I did not even know I had intercostal muscles.

    For older men, go with the 12 reps instead of the 5 it is safer.

    It was a happy injury in the end.

    This started the new chapter of my resistance training which is a separate post.
    Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
    ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

    Comment


    • #48
      My main (only?) goals in doing gym workouts is to enhance endurance and maybe reduce the risk of injury. The neurophys suggests that to do this you need to do 4 or 5 reps, with a load that would lead to failure at 5 or 6 reps. Prior to attacking such a regimen you need to do several months of more ordinary lifting to toughen up the tendons. You also need to rest for 4 minutes at the least between sets or exercises. I did multiple sets of step-ups, sled pushes (10 step pushes) and leg presses plus cable pulldowns for poling. Between each set I did trunk muscle work and flexibility to kill the time. I would have added other knee dominant exercises but I was afraid of injuring my patello-femoral joint.

      How does such a regimen increase endurance? By increasing motor unit recruitment. It gets more of one's muscle fibers working on a rotation basis theerby increasing endurance.

      Comment


      • #49
        New guy to the forum checking in. Iíve got a big build, and prior to this summer, I was pretty sedentary. Over the summer I dropped 20lbs, looking for 10 more before I re-evaluate. Running sucks and I donít like the abuse on my shins and knees. I started slow, added exercises gradually, and this is where I am.
        Pull Day: 3 sets of 10 assisted pull-ups, 3 sets of 12 deadlifts, 3 sets of 15 seated rows. In between these sets I do sets of kettlebell swings. Iím up to 40 swings per set.
        Push Day: push ups, dips, overhead press, goblet squats, box steps. Afterwards I walk on the treadmill at 4mph, increasing 2 degrees of incline every five minutes until 8 degrees, and I extend the time at that angle as my endurance improves.

        Yesterday i I took the day off from the gym and road marched 7.5 miles with a ruck. I figure this is good mental prep for when your body is tired and sore. I feel it in my glutes today...

        Comment


        • #50
          Sounds great. That whole push - pull thing was a mystery to me. 40 swings in a row is not easy!
          Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
          ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

          Comment


          • #51
            Originally posted by Bunchberry View Post
            Sounds great. That whole push - pull thing was a mystery to me. 40 swings in a row is not easy!
            Full Disclosure: It's 40lbs, that's the heaviest my gym has. I've seen programs where its suggested that men use 55lb kettlebells.

            Comment


            • #52
              The "money workout" for uphill athletes:

              After 8 weeks of "transition" training in Zone1 and 2 with 10-12k of elly per week I started heavier training by including a once weekly steep weighted hill climb and a once weekly gentle weighted hill climb. My steep hill is 200' and is on average a 50% grade (30 deg.). I go up and down 10x.
              My MO is to wear a 10 lb. pack up and down and to carry up approx 10lbs. of rocks in my hands and drop them.
              The limiting factor should be your legs (ie. not your breathing). This is a hard workout and you should feel you are at your limit throughout the climbs. When I am peaking for an event I do three of these a week. It can be rough on the quads and knees.

              Uphill Athlete calls this workout "muscular endurance" or ME.
              Last edited by Neil; 09-11-2019, 05:08 PM.

              Comment


              • CatskillKev
                CatskillKev commented
                Editing a comment
                This sounds like Leave no Rocks, not Leave no Trace. Displacing 100 pounds of rocks, per workout? Rough on the quads, knees, and natural landscape? Sorry, but this sounds, shall we say, not good?

              • Neil
                Neil commented
                Editing a comment
                Good point about the rocks. So far I've harvested most of them from illegal fire rings. This rock-strewn gully is just off downtown Montreal and there are all sorts of "interesting" goings on happening there. The odd squatter in a makeshift shack, multiple fires often made out of uprooted trees, cans and bottles, broken glass, bad graffiti.
            Working...
            X