Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Congratulations On Project 100 Neil!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Congratulations On Project 100 Neil!

    People seem to be saying it on this thread or that. I'm happy to even know of the person that completed such a task. I thought it was high time someone created a thread. Un-**cking-believable! So amazing, such a time we live in. Absolutely breath-taking! You are truly an inspiration to all who hike any paths in the Adirondacks. Hail to the king!

  • #2
    Aw shucks, it was easy.
    Honestly? Hardest thing I've ever done. Hard mentally, logistically and of course physically.

    Comment


    • salt
      salt commented
      Editing a comment
      I can only imagine, haha. So is a break from hiking in your future or just business as usual?

  • #3
    Logistics? Yeah, it’s winter, so arranging hiking partners and figuring out the best approach was work.

    Physically? You definitely had to push. But you were in shape for it, so I would guess that all but 2-3 hikes weren’t pushing you physically.

    It’s the mental fortitude, being able to go hiking at 15 below Fahrenheit, knowing that you had to do the same the next two days. Or setting out before dawn knowing that if you don’t complete the hike as planned (see: North River) then you’ll effectively have to re-do the whole thing. That’s what was unbelievable to me. You did this for three months! Wow.
    ADK 46/46W + MacNaughton, Grid 277/552
    Photos & Stuff

    Comment


    • #4
      I found the constant logistical planning (weather, food, clothing, packing, getting dressed in the morning, watching the clock every minute and gauging my preparedness so as not to be late, thinking of tomorrow's hike while doing today's and the endless messaging (200-300 messages minimum sent and received for each weekend with multiple chat windows open on FB) to be draining. The minute I got back to the loft (but after opening my first beer!) I logged in to see who had dropped out and if anyone new was in for the next day and to inform those who were still in of any changes to the plan.

      To the mental strain of the actual hikes I became more and more hardened, just learned to suck it up. Plus, I had already spent months doing hard hikes in any weather right up to the start date.

      Mental hardening. I could offer a boot camp for business execs looking for that extra edge. 10K per week to carry my gear through the Sawtooth Range.

      Comment


      • CatskillKev
        CatskillKev commented
        Editing a comment
        Your first sentence was draining for all of us.

    • #5
      One thing that I think should be pointed out is that you not only achieved this, but also did it in a hard winter. There can be some considerable variance in the winters from year to year. You had to start with nearly record low temperatures for the first several weeks of Project-100, that cold spell was brutal!, and then tackle massive snowfall at the end of P100. This makes the feat even more impressive that you did it in less than 3 months and during a particularly intense winter.

      Neil: Just for fun, can you rank the top 5 hardest hikes with maybe a short sentence explaining the ranking? Would be interesting to see!

      Comment


      • Skyclimber
        Skyclimber commented
        Editing a comment
        I was going to say the same! Neil did this in a very challenging Winter making this so much more impressive!

    • #6
      Incredible project, congratulations!

      Comment


      • #7
        Originally posted by Neil View Post
        Aw shucks, it was easy.
        Honestly? Hardest thing I've ever done. Hard mentally, logistically and of course physically.
        This is not to say you're in the best shape of your life, though, for this particular challenge. I'm asking this because I'm finding myself in the best snowshoeing shape of my life at 53.

        So, after this extended amount of hiking, do you feel you reached the best shape of your life for this particular physical workload? As in, do you feel you could handle an excessively long winter hike better than you ever could before?
        I might be kidding...

        Comment


        • #8
          Originally posted by CatskillKev View Post
          So, after this extended amount of hiking, do you feel you reached the best shape of your life for this particular physical workload? As in, do you feel you could handle an excessively long winter hike better than you ever could before?
          The term "in shape", as you know, can reflect just one of a combination of physiological parameters. I trained specifically for one specific set of parameters. Namely, a big aerobic base and endurance, which are closely related. Along the way, other aspects of being in shape developed as well, such as strength, mental focus and the ability to endure discomfort. I trained for something very specific.
          This is in opposition to say, cross-fit (as I understand it), which trains as many components as possible as an end in itself. Not unlike learning a language but never speaking it - although I'm sure many would consider this to be a naive assumption.

          When I trained for Project-46 I trained for it differently than for P-100 and as such was in excellent shape - for that particular challenge. Same for Project Full Deck.

          So, to answer the first question: yes. To the second, yes also but the physiological and physical capacities will diminish quickly, while the mental probably will not.

          One week after the 100th peak, I feel fine physically and did so the very next day, although I would have felt fatigue in my legs if the very next day I had tried to do a hike with significant elevation gain. It's mentally that I felt spent and drained but that is coming back to normal day by day.

          Comment


          • CatskillKev
            CatskillKev commented
            Editing a comment
            Well put! Thank you. That's what you call inspiration!
        Working...
        X