Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Project-100. Peaks and people list.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Project-100. Peaks and people list.

    There may be some spelling corrections and a couple of missing names but I think this is it.

    Dec. 22. Moose & McKenzie. David Gomlak, Joe Bogardus, mastergrasshopper.
    Dec. 22. Pitchoff. mastergrasshopper.
    Dec. 23. Whiteface, Esther. mastergrasshopper
    Dec. 23. Morgan. mastergrasshopper
    Dec. 27. Saddleback-Jay. Luc La Barre, Thomas Penders, Brian Merriam.
    Dec. 28. LWJ, UWJ, Armstrong, Gothics, Sawteeth. autochromatica.
    Dec. 29. Phelps, Tabletop, TR. Luc La Barre.
    Jan. 3. Donaldson, Emmons, Seward, Seymour. Joe Bogardus.
    Jan. 4. Avalanche Peak. Julie Chevalier.
    Jan. 7. Cliff, Redfield, Colden. Joe Bogardus, Alistair Fraser.
    Jan. 8. Lyon Mtn. Solo.
    Jan. 12. Averill Peak. Adam Crofoot. Hurricane. Solo
    Jan. 13. DNCB. Glen Bladholm
    Jan. 14. Dix Range. Joe Bogardus, Bill Brizzell
    Jan. 19. Calamity. Christina Nash, Brian Merriam. Adams. Brian Merriam
    Jan. 20. Cheney Cobble. Jean Roy MJ Ouellet
    Jan. 21. Wallface, McNaughton. Luc La Barre, Sean Carpenter.

    Jan. 26. Lost Pond Peak. Joe Bogardus, Nancy Labaff, Brian Merriam.

    Jan. 26. Cascade, Porter. Solo.

    Jan. 27. Green, Giant, Rocky Peak Ridge. Alistair Fraser.

    Jan. 28. Noonmark. Alistair Fraser.

    Jan. 28. Blue Mountain. Alistair Fraser, Bill Brizzell.

    Jan. 29. Big Slide. Solo.

    Feb. 02. Sawtooth #4 & #2. Joe Bogardus.

    Feb. 02. Sawtooth # 3, #5 & #1. Jean Roy and Marie-Josée Ouellet.

    Feb. 09. Wright, Algonquin, Iroquois, Marshall. Alistair Fraser (WAI), Glen Bladholm, Matt Marsh.

    Feb.10. Henderson, Panther, Couchsachraga. Alistair Fraser, Jean Roy, Glen Bladholm (Panther-Couch).

    Feb. 11. Marcy, Skylight, Gray. Marie-Josée Ouellet, Maude

    Feb. 16. Snowy

    Feb. 16. Puffer

    Feb. 17. Panther, Buell, Brown Pond. Bill Brizzell, Brian Merriam.

    Feb. 18. Blue Ridge 90 and Blue Ridge 99. Cory Delavalle, Butch Braun, Mike Spranger.

    Feb. 19. Slide. Joe Bogardus

    Feb. 23. Boreas, Wolf Pond, Sunrise. Nancy Labaff

    Feb. 24. Haystack, Basin, Saddleback. Kevin MacKenzie, Allen Weschler

    Feb. 25. Allen. Solo.

    Mar. 03. Little Moose, Cellar, Wakely. Jean Roy, Marie-Josée Ouellet

    Mar. 04. Blue Ridge 56 and Pillsbury. Jean Roy, Marie-Josée Ouellet

    Mar. 05. Street and Nye. Solo.

    Mar. 06. Blue Ridge, Hoffman. Cory Delavalle

    Mar. 07. Lewey and Gore. Solo

    Mar. 09. Santanoni & Little Santanoni. Bill Brizzell (part-way), Glen Bladholm.

    Mar.10. Stewart, Sentinel. Jean Roy, David Gomlak.

    Mar. 12. Willmington. Solo, trail broken by Luc Labarre.

    Mar. 16. North River. Alistair Fraser, Gérald Léveillé.

    Mar. 17. Fishing Brooks 1 & 2. Shawn Carpenter (FB2), Marie-Josée Ouellet, Éric Morris, Mélanie, Jean-François Lebeau.

    Mar. 18. Kilburn. Marie-Josée Ouellet, Jean Roy, Nathalie Ménard, Spencer Crispe, Cory Delavalle, Gérald Léveillé, Éric Morris, ?,?.







  • #2
    Time to write a book. Here’s your title: Project 100. Whew. Brainstorming takes a lot out of me. I need a coffee.
    Nothing like being in the woods.

    http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Gerard01 View Post
      Time to write a book. Here’s your title: Project 100. Whew. Brainstorming takes a lot out of me. I need a coffee.
      It would not sell enough copies to be worth the paper it was printed on. However, I plan on doing an extensive write-up in e-book format and either making it free or requesting a donation for the foundation in exchange for downloading it.

      Comment


      • Gerard01
        Gerard01 commented
        Editing a comment
        I beg to differ. I think it would sell many copies. I’m certainly would purchase it and eagerly read it. “Project 100” is just a starter. Let’s see....how about, “Project 100: 100 day’s in the Adirondack Wilderness”? Or, “Reach For The Top: Project 100”? I think it would be a hit.

    • #4
      Neil, congratulations. Super Impressive. I look forward to reading the e-book or whatever. I hope when you get to doing it if you'll list what you might have done differently.

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by Woodly View Post
        Neil, congratulations. Super Impressive. I look forward to reading the e-book or whatever. I hope when you get to doing it if you'll list what you might have done differently.
        Excellent suggestion. Got any more? Anybody?

        Comment


        • Woodly
          Woodly commented
          Editing a comment
          Others especially newbies, and maybe me [I'm pretty set], could learn from what type of boots and clothing you wore.

      • #6
        I don't know if you want to talk about the physical wear and tear. I'm thinking that your feet may have experienced some increasing wear and tear. I've hiked almost every day this month, so I'm putting more and more duct tape on my feet. Of course I'm using bigger snowshoes, but its just hard for the binding to hit your boot evenly, or the inside of your boot to hit your foot evenly.
        I might be kidding...

        Comment


        • #7
          Nice work by a 62 year old (same age as me!).

          How was the trip up Gore? Did you end up going from Second Pond?

          Comment


          • Neil
            Neil commented
            Editing a comment
            Yes, went from Second Pond TH. 4 hours RT. Don't know why I was so fixated on doing it via the ski runs.

        • #8
          Most thru hikers lose weight. I know you did not hike every day (all the more impressive), but did you ? My weight went down the year we hit the W46 every weekend.
          Tom Rankin - 5444W, etc., etc.

          Web Master - NY Forest Fire Lookout Association
          Member #0003 - ADKHP Foundation
          Volunteer - Balsam Lake Mountain
          Past President - Catskill 3500 Club
          CEO - Views And Brews

          Comment


          • #9
            Didn't lose much overall. I lost weight every weekend but gained most of it back during the week. I didn't eat or drink much while hiking and was often too tired to eat much for dinner. Then from Mon to Thurs. I was starving all the time and I ate and ate to catch up. On Mondays when I didn't hike I'd start the day with 3 eggs, 4 well-buttered and jammed toast, a bowl of cereal then drive home. By Jay I was already hungry(!) so I'd get a huge roast beef sub, root beer and chips at Devin's deli.

            I'm assuming I paced myself (for the most part) to stay mostly in the fat-burning zone, which is a function of having developed an aerobic base during 6 months of structured training. But even in that zone my reading says you still get 50% of your calories from glucose. So, you HAVE to fuel. Towards the final month I was eating the junkiest Pop-tarts, Snickers bars, store-bought cookies sandwhiched with Nutella and anything else I figured I would eat.

            Comment


            • hv_hiker
              hv_hiker commented
              Editing a comment
              "I was eating the junkiest Pop-tarts, Snickers bars, store-bought cookies sandwiched with Nutella and anything else I figured I would eat."

              Strange, I've been following that exact plan for years and haven't noticed any improvements in my hiking.

            • moosebeware
              moosebeware commented
              Editing a comment
              "Towards the final month I was eating the junkiest Pop-tarts, Snickers bars, store-bought cookies sandwhiched with Nutella and anything else I figured I would eat."

              Nice. That's a far cry from the pancakes you were still eating on Calamity! I made some waffles, maple syrup banana chips, and baked eggs with bacon for this weekend.

          • #10
            6 months of structured training leading up to this winter was a bit risky. I know that people who stress themselves anaerobically expect to peak after 5 and 1/2 months. You could have been better off training for 3 months, then the winter itself would have trained you the rest of the way. I realize though that you were starting from scratch.
            I might be kidding...

            Comment


            • #11
              ....So awesome.....congrats!

              Comment


              • #12
                Originally posted by CatskillKev View Post
                6 months of structured training leading up to this winter was a bit risky. I know that people who stress themselves anaerobically expect to peak after 5 and 1/2 months. You could have been better off training for 3 months, then the winter itself would have trained you the rest of the way. I realize though that you were starting from scratch.
                There is no way I would have been ready with only 3 months of training. The hikes were too hard right from the get-go. The key word is structured. Ie. I understand that to mean not leading to injury. The first 4 weeks of training were the transition phase where I explored how many hours per week of training load I could absorb. Then the plan was comprised of a series of increases each of which was followed by a consolidation period. Additionally, I was very body-aware and skipped workouts, took unscheduled breaks whenever I deemed that a hike or workout session would take me further from my goal. The book I used, which has become the bible among alpinists, Training for the New Alpinism has 12 month plans as well. Most of the training time was spent in Zone 1, an easy-paced zone where you are able to breath through your nose and in my case, with a heart rate around 132. This HR, with training, enabled me to ascend at a rate of 33 feet per minute, feeling as if I was out for an evening stroll. 20% of my aerobic power training time was spent in higher intensity zones. Plus there were weighted hill climbs, max-strength gym workouts and trunk muscle workouts. I took one day a week off.

                In spite of many over the top grueling 2 and 3 day consecutive day weekends with 5 hours of sleep a night I emerged at the end of this project with no aches or pains except on the 2nd last hike I had a re-occurrence of a sore spot on the outside of my right foot. I stopped then and there and removed one of the two socks I was wearing and the pain was gone. I can hardly believe it but I finished pain-free.

                On the other hand, at the end of Project Full Deck I had a very painful patello-femoral syndrome in my left knee. Prior to the 6 month training program I spent 4 months re-habbing my left leg. 3x a week in the gym, never missed a workout and did a series of strenuous and boring rehab exercises that I mixed up with trunk muscle (Scott's Killer Core routine!) and well-leg strength exercises. I also walked quite hard and fast about 30 miles a week. So when the real training began after the 4-week transition period my body (and knee) was ready. 10 weeks out from P-100 here was one of my peak weeks before cutting back 50% for the next week to consolidate the gains before upping the ante again.

                Comment


                • CatskillKev
                  CatskillKev commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Well, sounds like you're happy with your 8 or 9 month plan. I suppose it is a different kind of workload when you're pacing things , as opposed to going all out in a one-time performance for a climax. So maybe you can throw out the 5 and 1/2 month idea for absolute performance in a singularly important event, since your "event" was not that kind of event. Some people, I think, don't believe in peaks. I suppose that people that don't go 100% maybe can do that.

                  With those "hardest thing you ever did hikes", you may have crashed harder afterward, and maybe you were already crashing is why they were "your hardest thing ever", but it was probably best to finish out like that. I'm sure the tree prison was the major factor, though.

                  Whatever you did, it certainly worked, and you came out the other side unscathed, or relatively without scathe, so a success!

                • Neil
                  Neil commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Happy? In the case of P-100 it was binary: pass or fail, 100 peaks or, less than 100. So, it was a pass. Within the context of my training for the "event" I created as best I could a sub-structure to mirror 3-4 days bursts followed by 3-4 days of rest. Indeed , Training for the New Alpinism prepares you for events that may last for months.

              • #13
                I've been hibernating this winter and I'm just catching up here on your impressive accomplishment. My winter project was more of a beer/ice cream based weight gaining plan.

                After a quick glance at the list and with several "two hikes" days in Dec/Jan, my first question is: what percentage of the time (roughly speaking) was hiking in the dark?

                Comment


                • CatskillKev
                  CatskillKev commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Did you actually need to gain weight? Did your training accomplish your goal? Are you happy with the result? This is all you can ask.

                • greenmountaingoat
                  greenmountaingoat commented
                  Editing a comment
                  Hahahahahaaa!!!,no!!! My wife and I had a baby and have been hunkered down at home all winter. I'm happy with the result of the baby situation but not with putting on 10 more pounds of blubber situation. With any luck I'll be wearing him in a backpack and on a trail 3-5 times a week once the thermometer rises to a reasonable temperature for a 2 month old to be out in. I've been dying to get outdoors with all of this great daylight and sunshine but it's been so damned cold!

                • Neil
                  Neil commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I remember a period of forced inactivity. I was determined not to gain any weight. Sheesh! 1800-2000 calories a day? Starvation. Zero beer or wine, barely any carbs. But I did it.

              • #14
                Congrats Neil! Very impressive. Hope you can relax for a few weeks.

                Comment


                • CatskillKev
                  CatskillKev commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I think he should go to the Quebec hills with his biggest snowshoes and walk as slow as he possibly can, while breaking trail on a northern exposure.

              • #15
                Originally posted by BillB View Post
                Congrats Neil! Very impressive. Hope you can relax for a few weeks.
                Just woke up from a snooze. How's that?

                Comment

                Working...
                X