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Wallface Mtn. from Upper Works 9-07-2019

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  • Wallface Mtn. from Upper Works 9-07-2019

    I arrived at UW at 5:35am to an almost full parking lot. After some in-car breakfast, I signed in at 6:15 and set out. The main approaches to Wallface are from Heart Lake and UW. I chose the latter because I hadn't seen the Indian Pass trail since a few years. From the 2nd lean-to onward, the trail is in rough shape. I counted about eight long and wide sections of trail that were immersed in water and mud. Wallface stands out like a monolith. And the valley below is like another world of giant moss covered glacial erratics, dark caverns, slipppery boulders and a brook that runs beneath all of this at times. This was my second visit here, but this time I would be getting up close and personal.

    There's a heedpath of sorts that follows a drainage up to the base of the cliffs. But I climbed too high on the main trail before realising I was way off. Doubled back, and began to climb a rocky drainage for a while before it became allmost vertical. I checked my gps and realised I was off by 150 meters to the west. So I descended to avoid several large ledges, and side-hilled east and finally found the correct drainage (with cairns!) that headed north, straight towards the Wallface cliffs, The end of this herdpath gets pretty steep >45 degrees, but flattens out a little once at the base of the cliffs. And what a sight! Over 500 feet straight up, but the top is recessed so you can't see it. This area alone is worth the trip.

    To reach the summit itself, I proceeded to angle WNW , more or less hugging the the rock face. I encountered these beautiful large patches of thick, waist high ferns, right at the base. Lethal, however, because they concealed mini ledges which I fell into several times. (I'm still climbing at this point). There was also some spruce to push through. I travelled about 500 meters (1600 feet) before I was to contour around the western edge, and climb through a steep bushwack to reach the the summit plateau, which was quite surprisingly easy to navigate ie. fairly open woods. At the summit itself, I enjoyed expansive views of the Macintyre Range. One of the reasons: A swath of trees were clear cut at the summit. I assume this was done by a crew since all the trees seemed dead before they were felled, plus there was plenty of flagging leading in the area.

    I retraced my steps and headed back. I used my poles as prods in those lovely fern gardens, but I still fell into empty voids, probably being distracted by the great views. I picked up the correct drainage on the descent to the valley below. The boulders were a little greasy, and I slipped backwards in a pool of water about 2 feet deep. Luckily I didn't smack my head, and my pack took the blow. I was soaked, but the water was warm, no need to change, as it started to rain. I arrived at my car at 2:46 pm, just as the rain stopped.
    Last edited by DennisK; 09-09-2019, 08:15 PM.

  • #2
    Nice TR. I'd love to get around to Wallface someday.

    Note: The summit was clear cut by DEC when they were searching for the ill prepared kid from NJ that got lost and passed away in that area two years ago.

    Comment


    • gebby
      gebby commented
      Editing a comment
      DennisK It wasn't that he was found close to the summit. I think they had to clear a space for the helicopter to come in and do the extraction.

    • DennisK
      DennisK commented
      Editing a comment
      Gebby: thanks for info. LTT: you'd like this place, but it may be a stretch for Pokey. But the valley itself would be fun for both of you. Just watch your step

    • Learning The Trails
      Editing a comment
      DennisK - I wouldn't take her on a backcountry bushwhack.

      We did however miss the turn for Cold Brook Pass and walked about 2/10th of a mile to where the Indian Brook drains from Scott's Pond when we did Marshall. Little clearing with a view of some of the cliffs. Realized our mistake and backtracked the IBPT to CBP.

  • #3
    From your description this sounds like the best way to do Wallface. Very nice hike!

    Comment


    • DennisK
      DennisK commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Neil. My original plan was to ascend via the Wallface Ponds drainage. Perhaps that would have been a little rougher. I didn't find my route overly difficult. But that's just my perspective.

  • #4
    Nice climb.

    Climbed twice.

    One, starting from HPIC then starting the bushwhack shortly after leaving the trail and after the brook turns west toward Scott Pond. No view from the summit then. And did downclimb until it got very steep. Later, after getting a look later on realized it's quite a descent from the summit to the top of the cliffs. Climbers don't make paths up there, they rappel.

    Two, from Upper Works after going over the height of land of the Indian Pass. This got us closer to the cliff and we did get one close-up view from above.

    Neither was a breeze. But neither were stifling either.

    Don
    Attached Files

    Comment


    • DennisK
      DennisK commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks Don. When you came in from from UW, you ascended from the height of land of Indian Pass. I see some serious cliffs that had to be negotiated.

    • Hear the Footsteps
      Hear the Footsteps commented
      Editing a comment
      Not exactly. More details. We dropped elevation but not quite to the North Indian Pass Brook before starting to climb.
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