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Bruised, Bloodied but not Broken on S. Dix

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  • #46
    Originally posted by Photobug65 View Post
    Moo... keep on hiking!!

    Most of us have had a whacky accident happen to us at some point but don't let this affect you striving for #46.

    We needed Seymour and Seward for #'s 42 and 43 I believe... but we wanted to go for all four in a day. We started early and were at the summit of Seymour at 9am but didn't have views so I told my wife when I called her we were on Seeless. Then, as we headed down, within a few hundred yards of the summit I hit a pinky sized stick with my forehead that pierced my eyelid just above my left eye. I hit the ground with my hand over my eye... not knowing if I still had an eye... and stayed there writhing in pain until I had the courage to move my hand away. It hurt like hell but Doug said my eye looked intact and he blotted the blood away as my eye quickly swelled shut. It was tough descending with one eye as my depth of field was nill. When we got to the lean-to Doug asked me what I wanted to do... I said by the time we hiked out and got to an ER it wouldn't do much good so I wanted to at least get to Seward and go from there.

    Lacking any depth perception and being tentative about reinjuring my eye slowed us down and before we hit the Seward summit there was a massive thunder and lightning storm that had us pinned down for about twenty minutes. At the first let up we started moving quickly and crossed the Seward ridge as thunder boomed and lightning seemed to strike all around us! I have never been so scared on a hike but then we had to cross raging streams between Seward and Donaldson and when we got the CB herd path we headed down without hesitation, bagging the thought of all four.

    Things went well until we got to the crossing of CB... impassible for sure!! We had to follow the brook downstream until we found a log jam to aid our crossing. It was sketchy and I lost a pole but we made it. When we finally emerged on the trail near the bucket cairn I kissed the ground and knew the worst was behind us.

    I feel I dodged three "bullets" that hike... my eye injury, the lightning storm and crossing raging streams without incident. It never entered my mind to stop hiking and Doug, Speedy (his dog) and I completed our 46 shortly after this with SaBaHa during a Great Range Traverse and Doug and I finished our Winter round and have hiked the Catskill 35 too.

    I did go to the ER the following day and had an MRI to make sure nothing was lodged in the wound but there wasn't any more that they could do (too late for stitches) and all I have to show for it is a scar and a pinky sized stick that stayed in my pocket through the water crossings.

    Never stop striving for a goal... Improvise, adapt and overcome! Hike On!!
    Photobug,
    Wow, thanks for sharing your story; makes mine look like a sliver in my finger! Lots of people have shared stories with me; guess most of us keep these things to ourselves here on the forum for the most part!
    I am all good now and ready to hike my next hike. This disease doesn't go away easily! Our next hike will probably be either a peak we have done before or we will go with our son....we will see.
    Thanks again and happy hiking.
    Moo
    HPHikingmoo

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    • #47
      Originally posted by HPHikingMoo View Post
      ...I think I was distracted and talking to Mike ..
      FWIW, distraction has been one of several factors that have caused me to stumble. Lost in one's thoughts, deeply engaged in conversation, or an idea one wishes to share with one's companions, are moments when we are slightly less aware of our surroundings. Combined with a momentary misreading of the terrain and the whole house of cards comes tumbling down.

      As hikers, we continuously refine our ability to "walk, talk, and chew gum" on rough terrain but sometimes the terrain proves we need more practice. Admit it Moo, after umpteen High Peaks, you're a lot more comfortable negotiating rough trails today than when you started hiking. Stick with it and by your 46th peak you'll be as nimble as a mountain goat.

      PS
      I tore my finger in a fall on Cliff not because of distraction but due to a poor decision. It's not called the "School of Hard Knocks" for nothing!
      Looking for Views!

      Comment


      • #48
        [QUOTE=Trail Boss;239400]
        As hikers, we continuously refine our ability to "walk, talk, and chew gum" on rough terrain but sometimes the terrain proves we need more practice. Admit it Moo, after umpteen High Peaks, you're a lot more comfortable negotiating rough trails today than when you started hiking. Stick with it and by your 46th peak you'll be as nimble as a mountain goat.


        I am getting better at negotiating the rough terrain; a year ago I would have never attempted the McComb Slide and if I did, the scramble up S. Dix would have terrified me. I am not ready for Saddleback, but am hoping by next year and my grand finish, I will be there. (Think we are saving HaBaSa for ourfinish, or at least one of the 3.) Each one gets easier.....sort of.
        Thanks for the good thoughts. Hope to meet on the trail someday.
        Moo
        HPHikingmoo

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        • #49
          Hey, Moo! I'm glad to hear you are OK and it wasn't something that could've been worse. I know such thinks can be pretty scary, both for the person who took the fall and the folks they are with.

          I know you'll keep at it w/o hesitation. I hope all of your hikes to your 46 are fun and safe ones!
          We are closer now than we were five minutes ago

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          • #50
            I'm glad you were okay, Moo. Don't let this experience tarnish your ambition and drive to become a 46er - you can and will do it! I think it's a normal human reaction to have, no different from being afraid to drive after getting into an accident. You can and will persevere.

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            • #51
              Give it some time. Most of us have had some kind of accident along the way. It makes you more careful in the future.
              I always figure you are taking thousands of steps on uneven ground during a hike so you are bound to fall. (btw trekking poles saved me many times-not sure if you use them)
              Think it over , go with your gut feelings-you'll be right.
              104/115

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              • #52
                Originally posted by Rookie View Post
                Give it some time. Most of us have had some kind of accident along the way. It makes you more careful in the future.
                I always figure you are taking thousands of steps on uneven ground during a hike so you are bound to fall. (btw trekking poles saved me many times-not sure if you use them)
                Think it over , go with your gut feelings-you'll be right.
                Rookie,
                Thanks for the response. I have decided to go forward with my quest. I DO use trekking poles, although on that particular hike I had decided to only take 1. I think that might have been my problem. I may have tripped over it! It's 2 from now on.
                Moo
                HPHikingmoo

                Comment


                • #53
                  A few years ago we were hiking Algonguin and Iroquois and decided to do it as a loop - going down via Avalanche pass. I somehow lost my footing, grabbed some scrub which ripped out of the ground and down I tumbled. I thought I'd just keep going and that's what scared me the most. I also left a lot of the skin from my lower right leg on the rock. It was a tough hike out. It didn't make me want to quit but it did make me gun shy for a while. What makes me question my ability to finish is a day like Allen or having dead legs on Redfield, the 2nd peak of a long day. I am also pushing 50 and wonder how I ever got myself into this! But at the end of every hike I marvel at what I accomplished and that makes it all worth it. After 7 years I find myself with just 3 peaks to go. How can I quit now??! You can do it! Slow and steady wins the race - that's my motto, especially when my 16-year-old tells me how slow I am!
                  www.adkhikermom.webs.com
                  46/46

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    Originally posted by adkhikermom View Post
                    A few years ago we were hiking Algonguin and Iroquois and decided to do it as a loop - going down via Avalanche pass. I somehow lost my footing, grabbed some scrub which ripped out of the ground and down I tumbled. I thought I'd just keep going and that's what scared me the most. I also left a lot of the skin from my lower right leg on the rock. It was a tough hike out. It didn't make me want to quit but it did make me gun shy for a while. What makes me question my ability to finish is a day like Allen or having dead legs on Redfield, the 2nd peak of a long day. I am also pushing 50 and wonder how I ever got myself into this! But at the end of every hike I marvel at what I accomplished and that makes it all worth it. After 7 years I find myself with just 3 peaks to go. How can I quit now??! You can do it! Slow and steady wins the race - that's my motto, especially when my 16-year-old tells me how slow I am!
                    I think it was the fear of one of us being all alone that got to me and all the what might have happened. I am ok and over it now but will surely be more cautious from now on. Congratulations for being almost there. When is your big finish going to be?
                    Moo
                    HPHikingmoo

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      Moo, reading this several years later. Still hurts, the thought of it.
                      Jim

                      "A full appreciation of mountains is not to be experienced by merely looking; that is why men climb." -Francis S. Smythe, British mountaineer

                      Comment


                      • SummitHat
                        SummitHat commented
                        Editing a comment
                        It's a testament to Moo's courage that after this harrowing experience she contributed so much to the hiking community, on the trails and as a mentor to many.

                        In the Spring of 2014 as a nod to her perseverance Moo was presented with a unique map of the High Peaks... painted on a hardhat.
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