Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Trap Dyke 7/20

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Trap Dyke 7/20

    I've been a long time lurker, and I don't often write TR's, but I think yesterday's shenanigans are worthy of a report. The decision to head to the Trap Dyke instead of the MacIntyre Range was made at the northbound great adirondack toilet on the drive up. My buddy and I set off from South Meadows at 9:23 am with a quick pace that landed us Avy pass with before we could consider what we were getting ourselves into. I had walked through the Avalanche Lake corridor a couple years ago, leaving me with only one impression of the dyke, and I hadn't been there since. After a quick break at Avalanche Lake for pictures and testing of the acoustics, we shwacked around to the bottom of the dyke. My buddy twisted his ankle, and we took a long break at the base before heading up. The magnitude of the slide really hits you when it's right in front of you. After a Cliff Bar, we started up. The first few sections were not bad, and we lumbered on slowly, until we reached the waterfall. The sections around the waterfall were a bit technical, and my friend had some trouble going over them. We made it through by going one section at a time. Someone installed a bolt with a piece of climbing line in the crux. I don't know how anyone would have gone past that before that was installed. Once we were above the waterfall, I stopped for some pictures and to take it all in. Near the top, we decided to stay in the dyke and shwack through some brush. We were following a drainage on the map, which eventually coincided with the yellow trail. We reached the summit of Colden shortly thereafter. While enjoying a pb&j sandwich, a couple from Ottawa walked up a slide in front of where we were chilling. After talking with them, we found that the slide they climbed wasn't difficult at all. Next time I'll avoid the unnecessary bushwhack!

    The fatigue from the day hit me like a brick wall about halfway to Lake Arnold. It seems like that section of trail from Lake Arnold to Marcy Dam goes on forever. Unfortunately, all good things eventually come to an end, and this hike was no exception. We stopped for pictures and water at Marcy Dam on the way out, eventually reaching South Meadows trailhead around 7ish. After a quick stop for a swim at Lower Cascade Lake, I was en route to the Lower 518.

    All Admiral Ackbar references aside, the Trap Dyke made for an epic day. This was one of the best days I've ever had in the mountains. If you are thinking about doing it in the future, you totally should. But you should really be smart about it. That goes from choosing your line over each set of rock, to contingency plans about your entire day. There were many sketchy spots where bad things could have happened, but we worked past them one step at a time. Clichι, I know, but when your mind starts playing tricks on you, sometimes you just have to keep moving. I've also really grown to like slide climbing, and will certainly do more in the future.

    Cheers!

  • #2
    Sweet!

    Now I know even more people who can go with me once I stop being broken! (might not happen till next year)
    "I saw a squirrel!" - GIR

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by Sprucelickah View Post
      Someone installed a bolt with a piece of climbing line in the crux. I don't know how anyone would have gone past that before that was installed.
      Congratulations on a great day. Note, however, that hundreds of people over many decades have climbed the dike without this new installation, which sounds like an unauthorized defacement of the rock (litter). No doubt someone will remove it soon and no one should count on it being there in the future. The only thing difficult about that part of the climb is the exposure and the dire consequences of a mistake, without which it would be a relatively easy scramble.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Gregory Karl View Post
        Congratulations on a great day. Note, however, that hundreds of people over many decades have climbed the dike without this new installation, which sounds like an unauthorized defacement of the rock (litter). No doubt someone will remove it soon and no one should count on it being there in the future. The only thing difficult about that part of the climb is the exposure and the dire consequences of a mistake, without which it would be a relatively easy scramble.
        I have been thinking about this one and I'm not sure I would classify it as an unauthorized defacement or litter. The Trap Dike is more of a Class 3 or 4 climb and some pitches are at least a 5.8, so really it's a rock climbing scramble.

        I think that bolt is a legitimate rappel / belay anchor, so although it may not be necessary for the ascent it probably is a key piece of protection for a belay or rappel and totally legal as far as rock or ice climbing ethics go. I'm not sure what the DEC's position on it would be.

        In my opinion the real litter in the HP's are the Gothics Cables, totally unnecessary and a true eyesore. How did a garden hose ever get approved as an aid to climb up a High Peak?
        The greatest precept is continual awareness.

        Comment


        • #5
          Glad you enjoyed your day and thanks for sharing ! I did the trap dyke pre Irene so I can't wait to get back out there . The views from out on the slide are truly amazing .
          That lake Arnold trail does seem to go on forever!
          Not all those who wander are lost....JRR Tolkien

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by DeepForest View Post
            I think that bolt is a legitimate rappel / belay anchor, so although it may not be necessary for the ascent it probably is a key piece of protection for a belay or rappel and totally legal as far as rock or ice climbing ethics go. I'm not sure what the DEC's position on it would be.
            I spoke rashly. With a little more thought: I have nothing against an anchor, but leaving ropes is not cool.

            Comment


            • #7
              Rock climbers have their own subculture and ethical debates just as we hikers do here, and I've only been on the periphery of that sport, definitely not qualified to opine on it. But... if I had to guess, I'd guess rock climbers would look down their noses at a bolt on the Trap Dike, more because it's unnecessary than because of some wilderness intrusion. Just my guess.

              Of course, how DEC sees it in light of the UMP for the High Peaks Wilderness is another question.

              Comment


              • #8
                The presence of a bolt in the trap dike is new, and odd. I was through there a couple weeks ago, and did not see a bolt.

                There's no difficulty in the dike hiking route itself that would require a bolt; it's truly 3rd/4th class if the best route is taken. The crux waterfall has vertical exposure, but very easy climbing; I have taken little girls up it and they have not needed a rope.

                Some possibilities:

                There are some difficult technical climbs on the walls of the dike (not the preferred hiking route, of course). Maybe there is a bolt on one of those?

                DEC itself occasionally installs a bolt anchor to use in rescues, in places where injuries have happened in the past (there is one such in Roaring Brook Falls, about half way up). Perhaps in the wake of last year's fatality, DEC has installed a "handy rescue anchor" in the dike?

                Interested to know more.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Sorry guys, I was off the grid for a few days and came back to this. In the original post, I guess I didn't make it clear enough. The feature in question was a bolt with a loop of webbing secured in the rock, in the upper half of the crux. It looked a permanent feature to me. I'm not really much of a rockclimber, so I could be wrong. I didn't mean to set off a forum firestorm when I mentioned that. I thought it might have been put there as a response to what happened with the kid from Binghamton last fall. I was still at Clarkson then, and our outdoor club had an extensive discussion about the incident.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Sprucelickah View Post
                    Sorry guys, I was off the grid for a few days and came back to this. In the original post, I guess I didn't make it clear enough. The feature in question was a bolt with a loop of webbing secured in the rock, in the upper half of the crux. It looked a permanent feature to me. I'm not really much of a rockclimber, so I could be wrong. I didn't mean to set off a forum firestorm when I mentioned that. I thought it might have been put there as a response to what happened with the kid from Binghamton last fall. I was still at Clarkson then, and our outdoor club had an extensive discussion about the incident.
                    Hey, it's not a firestorm till we hit page three

                    It's really just kind of an interesting question, we're all just speculating.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Great job! I did the TD two years ago and exited too late to get to the slide......bushwacked through the thick spruce. Next time we'll get it right
                      "Now he walks in quiet solitude the forest and the streams
                      Seeking grace in every step he takes
                      His sight has turned inside himself to try and understand
                      The serenity of a clear blue mountain lake" -John Denver

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DeepForest View Post
                        In my opinion the real litter in the HP's are the Gothics Cables, totally unnecessary and a true eyesore. How did a garden hose ever get approved as an aid to climb up a High Peak?
                        They are not there to directly aid hikers. Without the cables, in wet conditions, hikers were walking in the vegetation, widening the path. THe cables keep hikers on the rock. There were a couple years without the cables, and this was definitely happening.

                        This is not an issue at that section of the trap dike.
                        Guinness: Goes in brown, comes out yellow.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by pete_hickey View Post
                          They are not there to directly aid hikers. Without the cables, in wet conditions, hikers were walking in the vegetation, widening the path. THe cables keep hikers on the rock. There were a couple years without the cables, and this was definitely happening.
                          I guess Algonquin could use some in that case

                          We climbed the dyke last friday and didn't see the bolt, maybe it is in the chimney (we stayed on the left as indicated in a recent thread) ?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            re you sure it is a bolt?

                            I did the Trap Dyke two weeks ago and there was no "bolt" with a "climbing line". There was a piton (specifically a Lost Arrow) near the top of the steep section that had a runner or sling girth hitched through it. Is this what everyone is talking about?

                            That piton was there last year when did the dyke (I think it had a different piece of webbing on it then). I have recollections of having seen the piton in previous years also. It may have been placed by an ice climber or someone else at some time. It may be used as a rap station by those who descend the dyke.

                            But no bolt.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              That could be it. A piton kind of resembles a bolt. I wouldn't have known the difference. That would explain why I thought it looked like a bolt at a quick glance.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X