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Idea for a big hike

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  • #16
    I’m certainly not talking about flip flops. The Keen Arroyo II has lugs for traction, toe protection and heel support.

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    • Nivek
      Nivek commented
      Editing a comment
      I was only kidding, man. I Googled what they were. Wear whatever you want, but if it were me, I would wear a boot.....

      Or maybe trail runners, but i've never tried them yet. I have no experience with them.

      Good luck on your mission

    • debmonster
      debmonster commented
      Editing a comment
      I know someone (trail name Hawaii Bob) who thru-hiked the AT in a similar pair of Keen sandals. I use trail runners for 7-10 day backpack trips. If your ankles are strong and your pack is light you don't need boots.

    • FlyFishingandBeer
      FlyFishingandBeer commented
      Editing a comment
      I've got a couple of friends who hiked the A/T and wore Crocs for 90% of it. A prominent member here on the Forum has completed a big chunk of the 46 barefoot. Your Keens won't smell very good by the time you're done, but they'll be fine as long as you can keep the gravel out.

      Edit: I missed the part where you said you'll be wearing socks. You'll be fine. I'm a non-waterproof trail runner/approach shoe guy myself, but I frequently clip my Tevas to my pack for stuff like walking down the Memorial Highway and the Lake Road. They've got plenty of High Peaks approach trail miles on them as well. And yes, I'm one of those people who rocks a real small pack so my sandals get to take a ride outside.

  • #17
    I think you will want a complete shoe. On a hike like this, there's no real value in all the "cut-outs" that are in this sandal, which are just there so they can call it a "sandal."

    When I plan to go fast over long distances, I wear a trail running shoe, with a lightweight scree gaiter over it. All nice and light and flexible, but it keeps dirt, gravel, pine needles, etc. out of your shoes. On the trails you plan to use, I think you'd be stopping every hour to dump debris out of the sandals.

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    • #18
      I 100% agree with tcd. Also, your feet will stay dryer in a pair of trail runners than in boots. When I first started hiking, I wore classic "waterproof" hiking boots. Problem is the Adirondacks are so wet eventually the waterproofing would be overwhelmed and would become soaked. In addition, my feet would sweat a lot in them I would get hot spots and blisters. Having to tape your feet back together to finish a 20+ mile hike is no fun. Since I switched to trail runners my feet stay much happier, no hot spots, no blisters.

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      • #19
        60 yrs or so of hiking and hunting I never had a blister wearing 2 pairs of socks in properly fitted boots. I like the ideas of the trail runners and gaiter cover but not for overnight backpacking. Choices are huge. A couple people hike barefooted. I would never.

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        • Earthworm
          Earthworm commented
          Editing a comment
          Definitely agree on people finding what works best for them and going with it.

          Somethings that work for me wouldn't for others and vice versa. I certainly agree with you on the barefooting!

        • Groundpounder
          Groundpounder commented
          Editing a comment
          I think "fit" is probably the most important thing. For most ADK hikes I wore a pair of heavy leather Scarpa boots that fit my feet perfectly, with a synthetic liner sock and an "expedition weight" merino wool sock over top (my feet are going to sweat anyway, and I like the extra cushioning). Zero blisters, for days on end. It's just a combination that, after many, many years of searching, seems to work well for me.

          Everyone is different. Many swear by trail runners. That's probably fine if you have good ankles and are out for a day, or a light overnight. For me, for more serious work, I like the stability of a solid boot. Even just on long hikes around home, my feet feel less fatigued in the heavy boots, likely because the soles don't flex as much. The trade off is that when I'm used to wearing casual shoes around home strapping those things on feels like strapping concrete blocks to my feet. To each their own. Finding what works is definitely the biggest thing for anyone!

      • #20
        I have been using hiking shoes for my weekly day hikes. My ankles are getting much stronger with all the running and kettlebell work I have been doing. My ankles don't roll the way they used to so I will be trying the shoes on my next backpacking trip.
        Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
        ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

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        • #21
          Originally posted by Not_Built_For_Speed View Post

          It starts with Dial, Nippletop, Colvin and Blake. That's the 4. Instead of returning back over Colvin, I hang a left, down the Elevator Shaft. I use the Bartlett Ridge Trail and hike up the backside of Haystack. I then traverse the Great Range all the way to LWJ and return to my vehicle.

          So my 4 + 7 hike. Obviously not a day hike, I'd spend a night or two. So what d ya think?
          I would set up a base camp at Gill Brook and split this into 2 day hikes. Hike in the night before, set up camp. Next day carry a day pack to Dial, Nip, Colvin, Blake (and Colvin again) - or reverse the order. Return to camp. Next day, do Sawteeth, Bartlett Ridge to Haystack, then some or all of the Range. You could go HaBaSa, to Gothics over Pyramid and down (this would be my choice). Or if you go to the Wolf Jaws, take the Wedge Brook down and return to camp. Next day, pack up and hike out. These would be two tough days, but definitely doable.
          We don't stop playing because we get old; we get old because we stop playing ~ Satchel Paige

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          • Groundpounder
            Groundpounder commented
            Editing a comment
            You had a slightly different take on things than I did, Deb, but still the same idea. Full packs over the peaks are rough. The extra 15-20 pounds might not seem like much until you are carrying them on your back!

          • debmonster
            debmonster commented
            Editing a comment
            I too had carried a multi-day pack and chose to backpack on many of my high peaks hikes. I loved it, but did come to appreciate the base camp option for the longer days. For this combination of peaks, I think it's the best way to go.

          • Groundpounder
            Groundpounder commented
            Editing a comment
            That would definitely be two solid days from a base camp. Weighing hiking with a full pack (no need to backtrack - mental game), vs longer mileage and a lighter load, it would probably be a pretty even toss-up. The mental battle is always a huge battle, whether it be hiking, running, or biking.

            Personally, I'm done with full packs over peaks. Base camp all the way.
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