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Is there an order to follow to hike the 46?

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  • Is there an order to follow to hike the 46?

    Hi all,

    My wife and I just did Cascade and Porter for our first two high peaks. I am wondering if there is a order on which to hike next or what not. We have two trips planned over next summer. And would like to hit as many as possible. We were thinking Giant (Ridge Trail) to be next. But any information on this would be great.

    Thank you,
    John


  • #2
    You have to hike them alphabetically or they don't count. /s

    Most people start with the low hanging fruit and tag Cascade/Porter, Giant/RPR, Street/Nye, and Bid Slide when they first start out. Those are generally considered "easier" hikes because the mileage is relatively low on all of them. From there you'll kind of get a sense for which direction to head in based on how much enthusiasm you still have towards completing all 46.

    My mind was wandering like the wild geese in the west.

    Comment


    • Makwa
      Makwa commented
      Editing a comment
      You could go over Colvin to get to Blake but only Blake would count on that hike. You'd have to go get Colvin again in its proper order.

    • Learning The Trails
      Editing a comment
      Makwa You could bypass the summit/bolt on Colvin and go to Blake.

    • stone611
      stone611 commented
      Editing a comment
      I like the upcoming combo of Colden-Colvin-Couchsachraga ouch

  • #3
    Starting out Phelps is a good one too, mileage right around 8 miles total with most of that an easy warm up/cool down with to/fro Marcy Dam. That last 1.2 miles from the van ho to the great view on the ledge is a good workout and a flavor for whats to come with the some bigger hikes. If you get to the HPIC area at a decent time you will have no problem getting a spot even on summer weekends.
    Big Slide, Giant (with or without RPR) definitely great bang-for-beginner-buck too with the payoff views.
    35er #3133
    46er

    "Good Thoughts, Good Words, Good Deeds"
    Zarathustra

    Comment


    • #4
      Not sure if Makwa is making a joke, or not, but:

      There is no set order.

      If you do Colvin and Blake, in either order, they both count.

      Use your judgement when doing multiple peaks. Turn around instead of getting in trouble. But if you are not careful, you will leave 'stragglers', as we say. Colvin w/o Blake is a good example. Doing Couch and Santa w/o Panther would be another. Whiteface, but not Esther, etc.
      Tom Rankin - 5444W "In the depths of Summer, I finally learned that there lay within me an invincible Winter"

      Proud Member #0003 of ADKHP Foundation
      Volunteer Balsam Lake Mountain
      Past President Catskill 3500 Club
      CEO Views And Brews!

      Comment


      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        Not joking. Just referencing something totally unrelated to the original question posed. We probably should spin most of post #2 into a separate thread. We were discussing the idea of doing an alphabetical 46.

      • Learning The Trails
        Editing a comment
        Meh... We did Esther and Whiteface separate... Worked out better than doing both. Had way more summit time on a beautiful day at Whiteface as a result...
        Splitting things up in some cases isn't a bad thing.

    • #5
      Could we please not say absolutely bat ship crazy things in front of the newbies!

      There is no order or time limit on doing the 46 peaks.
      Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
      ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

      Comment


      • JohnnyNash8300
        JohnnyNash8300 commented
        Editing a comment
        Haha, I get it though. I caught on to where that was going right away. =D

    • #6
      Is there somewhere that has the lists of peaks that can be done together? We are in good shape and can handle what is thrown our way. We love the challenge

      Comment


      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        So to break it down the most common hikes...

        Groupings:
        Cascade & Porter
        Giant & Rocky Peak Ridge
        Wright, Algonquin & Iroquois
        Phelps & Tabletop
        Street & Nye
        Whiteface & Esther
        Upper & Lower Wolfjaw
        Sawteeth, Gothics, Armstrong
        Basin & Saddleback
        Gray & Skylight
        Dix & Hough
        Macomb, South Six, Grace
        Cliff & Redfield
        Santanoni, Panther, Couchie
        Dial & Nippletop
        Colvin & Blake
        Seward, Donaldson, Emmons

        Singles:
        Colden
        Marshall
        Allen
        Marcy
        Haystack
        Big Slide
        Seymour

      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        Variations on the above depending on fitness level...

        Haystack, Basin, Saddleback (aka HaBaSa)
        Marcy, Skylight, Gray (MSG)
        Dial, Nippletop, Colvin, Blake (DiNiCoBl)
        5 Dixes
        Sewards & Seymour
        MacIntryre Range (Wright, Algonquin, Iroquois, Marshall)
        Great Range Traverse or breaking up the Range into larger chunks

        I may be missing some. I will assume others will chip in and offer up what I may have missed.

      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        Last thoughts on this. TFR mentioned "stragglers" above. I call them "orphans" but they mean the exact same thing. Some of these hikes you will kick yourself for not getting the neighboring peak while you're in the neighborhood.

        The absolute musts to save yourself another trip...
        * Colvin & Blake -- you must add Blake unless you are physically unable to. You have to go over the summit of Colvin to get there so if you orphan it you have to climb Colvin again to get there. Or take the other approach to Blake which is something like 18 miles round-trip.
        * Street & Nye -- too close together to not do both. The herdpath splits so close to both summits that you'd basically be rehiking 95% of the same ground if you miss one or the other and have to go back.
        * Cliff & Redfield -- there is no short approach to get there. If you get one go grab the other. Leaving one will require another 18 mile day in the woods.
        * Emmons when you're in the Sewards. Calkins Brook herdpath dumps you near the summit of Donaldson and the only non-bushwhacking approach to Emmons is from there. Too far to go to not do the out/back to Emmons.
        * Panther while in the Santas. It's just a short out/back from the main herdpath so going back for it seems silly.

        The nice to gets...
        * RPR while on Giant. A lot of people do Giant very early in their round due to the low mileage. RPR is right there. The trail junction is just below the Giant summit. But make sure you're not biting off more than you can chew. Adding RPR tacks on another 1400-1500 feet of ele gain to your day. Nice to get if you can but not absolutely necessary.
        * Armstrong after Gothics or Upper Wolfjaw. You're right there from either side. If you miss it on your first trip you can always grab it on your next. Just plan ahead. Orphaning Armstrong seems like a huge oversight.
        * Gray from either Marcy or while on your way to Skylight. Same logic as Armstrong. Plan it for one trip or another while you're in the neighborhood.
        * Grace while in the Dixes. There is a nice approach from Rte 73 so having to going back wouldn't be a total whiff but while you're on South Dix the out and back to Grace seems logical.

        The easy ones to go back and get if you do orphan them:
        * Wright
        * Porter
        * Esther

        Opinions may vary on all of this. Some may wonder why another day out hiking is a bad thing. If you orphan a peak that just means you get to go hiking again. My argument always is opportunity cost. Having to go back and retrace ground just to tag a peak I missed "wastes" a day I could have used to explore someplace else I've never been. Bottom line... plan out your 46. Find the pairings you think you will be comfortable with. Do your best not to orphan any. Figure out the mileage and elevation gain ahead of time and work up to the big ones. And now that you're posting make sure you share some trip reports. We're running low on aspiring 46ers again on the forum. We've had several members finish their rounds this summer.

    • #7
      Wow, this is great information. I am printing these and going to investigate more. We normally have been camping and day hiking. We would like to be able to backpack to designated camping spots for a night. That would always be a super cool experience and we are not shy of doing so, but only where we are allowed. I am going to be getting the ADK 2019 map hopefully they are all updated on there. and OSM does show some.

      Comment


      • NickWI
        NickWI commented
        Editing a comment
        Backpacking in and camping is how I did Cliff, Redfield, Skylight, and Gray, and I loved that hike. I did those, and also Marshall, over three days/two night using the Uphill lean-to. There are also two designated camp sites at Uphill, but one was a mud pit when I was there in 2017. Bear in mind the hike to Uphill is as long as Cascade and Porter were round trip, and I worked up to this.

      • FlyFishingandBeer
        FlyFishingandBeer commented
        Editing a comment
        Keep in mind you can always grab one of the available spots on S. Meadows and set your shelter up within spitting distance of your car. These sites have no amenities at all, but they're free and conveniently access the Marcy Dam truck trail from the S. Meadows sign-in kiosk. So if you're coming in from out of town and can't find an available campground within a reasonable drive to a trailhead, or if its later in the season and you still want to camp but don't feel like lugging your cold weather gear out into the back country, they make a great option. From that point of access you can make relatively easy day hikes out of Phelps, TT, Marcy, and Colden. For a little more challenge, or hikes involving trekking back up to the Loj to a different trailhead there's Gray, Skylight, Marshall, Street, Nye, Wright, Algonquin, Iroquois. There's lots of other peaks that are commonly tagged from that area, but you may want to consider more efficient starting points for those. Big Slide, Cliff/Redfield, and Haystack all come to mind.

        A couple of years ago I set up camp along that road and hiked Colden, Gray, Skylight, and Marcy. While it was far from my hardest day ever, it was nice to not have to carry an overnight pack with me or worry about having to drive anywhere afterwards.

    • #8
      Originally posted by FlyFishingandBeer View Post
      You have to hike them alphabetically or they don't count. /s

      Most people start with the low hanging fruit and tag Cascade/Porter, Giant/RPR, Street/Nye, and Bid Slide when they first start out. Those are generally considered "easier" hikes because the mileage is relatively low on all of them. From there you'll kind of get a sense for which direction to head in based on how much enthusiasm you still have towards completing all 46.
      Is Giant/RPR considered low hanging fruit? DEC lists it as 4.500 feet of ascent. We've climbed 18 46ers and haven't done anything with that much elevation gain yet. Maybe we're elevation wimps.

      Comment


      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        I think new hikers think it is based on the mileage. But yes... the ele gain is big and I'd guess many folks bite off way more than they can chew attempting both. If you go from Cascade/Porter at 2400' ele gain to Giant/RPR and don't know what an extra 2100' of ele gain will do to your body you could be in for a rude awakening. But it's the low mileage figure that catches the eyes of newbies and they make the hike.

      • FlyFishingandBeer
        FlyFishingandBeer commented
        Editing a comment
        Giant by itself via its most common route is about 2980-3010 (or 3050 according to LakePlacid.com) feet of ascent, depending "over bump" or "around bump". That's starting at Chapel Pond on Rt. 73, which is at ~1620 feet, and taking the Ridge Trail up to its 4627-foot summit. That's not a small amount of ascent, but its nowhere near the DEC's highly questionable estimate (different trailhead perhaps?), and only about 6 1/2 miles round trip. While none of the peaks are "easy," Giant certainly qualifies as one of the "easiER" summits to reach. Its very straight forward, there's little to no mud, no route finding, and no real scrambling.

        Of course, your mileage may vary (YMMV). IMO trail conditions, distance, and vertical gain all must be factored together to determine difficulty, and even that can change with the weather.

      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        You forgot to add in RPR. That brings the trip to 4500'.

    • #9
      I found it to be a difficult day. Coming back up Giant was tough and I was tired. Just bring enough water.

      I also found it difficult to find out that RPR has an its own amazing view to the east and it's own amazing trail. My son and I will have to do that trail because it just has to get done. It deserves to be done.

      If you have the time and your nature is to explore the Adirondacks to it's fullest then leave RPR for it's own day.

      If you have to get it done then it will be a longer day then most for you. Start early and bring more food and water.

      Also, there are no wimps in the high peaks.

      Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
      ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

      Comment


      • jrjmurray
        jrjmurray commented
        Editing a comment
        Agreed; Missing out on the eastern approach to RPR is depriving yourself of one of the most amazing stretches of trail in the HP’s. Skip the peakbagging methodology for this one and enjoy RPR on its own.

    • #10
      Many people also backpack in when doing the Santanonis & the Seward/Seymour group. It makes it easier to do all the peaks involved (Couchsachraga, in the Santanonis,and Seymour with the Sewards) without overexerting yourself. Many also do them as day hikes, but unless you're pretty fast, it forces you to keep moving along.

      Comment


      • #11
        Makwa said this forum is running low on aspiring 46ers.

        Well, allow me to jump in and help fill the breach, lol.
        Ever since my first peak, when I was tired, drenched in sweat, calves muddied, and huffing and puffing like a choo-choo train, I was hooked. Oh did I forget to mention despite all that I had an immense grin on my face?

        I spend a lot of time thinking about future hikes. Especially since I plan on doing several overnights next summer. I think my first overnight will be Dial, Nippletop and Colvin and Blake. I also want to combine Marshall (from the Upper Works) with Cliff and Redfield. And Colden from the Loj, camp and then do Gray, Skylight and Marcy. Ive even considered spending an extra night after coming back from Marcy and hiking Phelps and TT, as long as I have the energy to do so.

        I have to drive 3 hours one way, every time I want to hike the High Peaks. Id really rather not have to make 30 trips to become a 46er.

        Comment


        • Bunchberry
          Bunchberry commented
          Editing a comment
          Makwa lied. That doesn't mean I don't love him and that you are extremely welcome for being here but he lied.

        • Makwa
          Makwa commented
          Editing a comment
          I love you too Bunchberry. I think we've had about a half dozen finishers over the last few months... maybe more. Down to perhaps a handful of active posters who are working on their 46. Just encouraging the aspirants to post trip reports. Personally I enjoy those more than the stories from folks who have been to a peak a bunch of times.

      • #12
        I'm not sure I've ever considered myself to be "aspiring", though I guess now I am, as I've hiked 36 different peaks (with several repeats and three-peats). I've been hiking in the high peaks since the spring of 2004, but it has only been since late 2015 that I've been making an effort to hike each of the 46 high peaks. It was on a trip that fall when another hiker asked me if I was hiking them all, and after a brief conversation where I stated I probably wasn't, he said, "You just have to keep making the trips." At that point I had already climbed around 15-20 different ones, so I asked/told myself, why not. Up until that point I was just trying to hike in different areas to mix things up.

        I live in southcentral Pennsylvania, 7 to 8 hours away, depending on the trailhead, so all of my trips along my journey to hike the 46 have involved backpacking/camping. During the first few years I used to hike peaks with a full pack and stay at a different tentsite each night, but those days are in the past. I would much rather tack a few extra miles onto my day by hiking from a base camp instead. I will echo FF&B's recommendation that South Meadows is a nice place to camp for certain peaks, as is the area around Roaring Brook Falls if you want to hike Giant or access any peaks through the AMR property. Both offer the convenience of having a vehicle nearby. For the South Meadows area I've chosen sites that were not directly on the road, but a little way down the access path starting at the parking area. Most of these sites are visible on OSM.

        Whenever I get a nice weather window (i.e. not much rain) in the coming weeks I'll be setting up a base camp in the Flowed Lands/Lake Colden area to hike Cliff (orphaned years ago due to an hours-long downpour) and Marshall, then walking out, driving down the road to the Santanoni trailhead and relocating camp in the Bradley Pond area, then hiking the Santanonis. The last few years I've hiked primarily solo, and have sufficient vacation time to take longer trips, so I have been able to avoid weekends. I'm not a fan of crowds or fighting for parking, so this approach has worked well for me. I've never seen a bear in the high peaks, but I have seen a marten (on the summit of Redfield).

        This past spring I introduced my girlfriend to the high peaks region. Due to previous spinal surgeries on her neck she is limited in her ability. We stayed in a hotel in Lake Placid and hiked Indian Head, Van Hoevenberg (a great "bang for the buck" peak), the ridge on Whiteface (from where the Wilmington trail goes by the road, then down the staircase), and Hopkins via the Mossy Cascade Trail. In complete honesty, I thought the view from Hopkins was as good as any I've seen from any high peak, and I even flushed a spruce grouse near the summit. Moral of the story, mountains other than the 46 are equally as beautiful. We plan on returning next spring to hike more "non-46" peaks.

        At the moment, my final "46 trip" is planned for next fall as parking at the Garden, setting up a base camp around Johns Brook, hiking Big Slide, the Wolfjaws (via Bennies Brook) and Armstrong, then back out to the car and hiking Rocky Peak Ridge from New Russia as my "finisher".

        Good luck to both of you on your journey! There are tons of helpful and knowledgeable people on this site, and I would also recommend OSM for pinpointing tentsites. For OSM, sometimes the sites don't appear unless you go to a higher zoom level.

        Comment


        • Groundpounder
          Groundpounder commented
          Editing a comment
          Edit to my above comment about the spruce grouse: I did some reading about them and did not know they are now quite rare in the Adirondacks. I am not an expert birder, but am familiar with woodland and backyard birds. I am 99% certain that I saw a spruce grouse. It flushed from a tree on the left side as I was nearing the open summit ledge of Hopkins. I was less than 5 feet away when it flushed, and I know I saw predominantly black/white coloration and red on the head. My immediate thought at the time was, "Holy sh_t, I think that was a spruce grouse."

          It was not a pileated woodpecker, or any other common woodpecker, it wasn't a raptor - it was a stout, grouse-sized bird. It didn't look like a ruffed grouse (too black), and didn't make me jump out of my shoes by startling me when it flushed. I was just wondering if anyone has seen them in an area other the NW section of the Park, the only place where the DEC says they have observed established populations? Was the one (I'm pretty sure) I saw a transient, or part of a reintroduction effort? Did I hallucinate the entire thing? There is also a high probability I will never know the answers to my questions!

        • Makwa
          Makwa commented
          Editing a comment
          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGZiTQS-lEc

          You had a rare sighting. The DEC estimates a breeding population of 150 to 300 spruce grouse in the Adirondacks.

        • Groundpounder
          Groundpounder commented
          Editing a comment
          Lol, @Makwa...thanks for the confirmation!

          This all reminds me an overnight at SnoBird when I was 99% sure I saw a Bicknell's thrush (late September 2012) puttering around in the underbrush near the tentsite, but it was pouring rain and I didn't want to ruin my camera by taking a pic. I'm just the type of person that the 1% of doubt is what sticks in my craw because I want to be certain. I do have a biology degree, so maybe that is part of the reason I'm a stickler for this kind of thing. I know what I saw, but it's that 1% that causes me to doubt. Anyway, a couple of hours after that incident I climbed, for the 3rd time, the Saddleback ledges with a full pack, but for the first time in the rain. Upon looking at them through the fog my hiking partner said, "No F_cking way." To which I replied, ok, but if not, we have to re-climb what we just came down (the east side of Basin). We made it without incident, but I almost didn't make the little boulder problem at the bottom with 40 extra pounds of momentum on my back. Live and learn! I do believe that was the very last time I've humped a full pack over the peaks.

      • #13
        I kept a spreadsheet for mine. I did it in 16 hikes. Could have been 15, but I ditched RPR during my winter hike. Here are all my stats and how I bucketed them (C3 is the GRT). Got some GPX in there to show the routes taken as well. The mileage and elevation gain should give you an idea of how long the day is.They are also listed in the order I did them:
        # Mileage Elevation Gain Peaks Peak Names
        C1- 8.5 2285 1 Phelps https://www.gaiagps.com/public/j84GaPChj0xqbe5JSVjoIrfW
        C2- 9.71 4164 3 Wright Algonquin Iroquois https://www.gaiagps.com/public/M67bt4eAqrDr1wu9WXj4yBJq
        C3- 25 9716 8 Marcy Haystack Basin Saddleback Gothics Armstrong Upper WolfJaw Lower Wolfjaw https://www.gaiagps.com/public/Ei5LKbgJBPnQZ2jspfUOwOkv
        C4- 6.2 2284 2 Porter Cascade https://www.gaiagps.com/public/uJqFqRp8fj3wyVnBv9pa4461
        C5- 9.6 3754 2 Esther Whiteface https://www.gaiagps.com/public/hh33aGcSRxDcIfPgA3WHC6sp
        C6- 7.4 4381 1 Giant https://www.gaiagps.com/public/WjxQt2drIg6BFYT8NXv1fluJ
        C7- 12.4 3411 1 Sawteeth https://www.gaiagps.com/public/LgimTgSASbaWApfpMfoxEARS
        C8- 14.5 5512 5 Dix Hough South Dix Grace Macomb https://www.gaiagps.com/public/y3HELiAM5NEyWiFpAKbUya1F
        C9- 17.6 6834 4 Dial Nippletop Colvin Blake https://www.gaiagps.com/public/kMmDuSvtHyT2ABXCstTtxwjN
        C10- 8.6 4685 1 Rocky Peak https://www.gaiagps.com/public/WjxQt2drIg6BFYT8NXv1fluJ
        C11- 8.7 3028 2 Street Nye https://www.gaiagps.com/public/qHGeu6MXfDK4Q2yQ9j46DaUe
        C12- 31.3 10503 7 Tabletop Colden Gray Skylight Redfield Cliff Marshall https://www.gaiagps.com/public/MydDcBTGZE4ivMkluCmkbmBD
        C13- 15.1 4814 3 Panther Couchsachraga Santanoni https://www.gaiagps.com/public/zhYxzSY01ZtTGFqkFTtApMCz
        C14- 21.5 6263 4 Seymour Seward Donaldson Emmons https://www.gaiagps.com/public/T2TO3lWKqLWiBUPN9iuBEftc
        C15- 18.58 3714 1 Allen https://www.gaiagps.com/public/0drnaqASHa8BUhFoK9SmyOVC
        C16- 8.92 3166 1 Big Slide https://www.gaiagps.com/public/8w09FeT3xDMgF3ey4cOEMeJV
        Last edited by piefka; 09-11-2019, 08:35 AM. Reason: Table Formatting

        Comment


        • bikerhiker
          bikerhiker commented
          Editing a comment
          Are you ryan atkins?
          Was C12 really all in one day/one shot? That looks like a really amazing loop, but unfortunately very impractical for most humans. Though not as many peaks as the GRT, that covers a lot more different areas (van ho/indian falls/lake tear drop down to opal and lake colden/av pass), seeing a lot of ground in that one (im kind of surprised the ele gain isn't significantly more than the GRT as no two peaks are really on the same ridge).
          While super impressive, I really dont think this is necessarily a good thing for a beginner that is looking to get into hiking the high peaks to see, as the one hike most start out on you did right after the GRT. Its just not even close to a practical approach unless someone is already in great hiking shape.

        • piefka
          piefka commented
          Editing a comment
          C12 was the only overnight I did. I stayed at the Uphill leanto after Redfield, hit Cliff/Marshall on the way out. I just reread my comment and it does seem to imply they were all day hikes, woops! I only offered my chart because OP said they were in great hiking shape. I just copy/pasted the chart because I had the work already done, I wouldn't recommend anyone following my path exactly. There is definitely a few ways I could have been more efficient, like not giving up on RPR, adding sawteeth into the GRT. I wish I had done Allen and the Santanoni range in the same day, but was nursing an injury. I bucketed to limit driving time and like Ryan, I was using them as OCR/ultra training opportunities. He is on another planet though haha. Some of them I planned a certain way because of whatever race I was training for. Like last year I had a half marathon with 5300' of gain, so I used Dial/Nippletop/Blake/Colvin 2 weeks out for some vert. Just too flat where I live. To me it wasn't really about peak bagging the most efficient way, even though that is probably how it sounds. I was just using different peaks as targets to mix it up really, get some good vert, and of course to see the outdoors.

        • bikerhiker
          bikerhiker commented
          Editing a comment
          Makes sense with wanting to hit certain groupings of peaks as tune-ups and gauges for upcoming events, what a great place to be doing some serious training in the peaks. C12, even without cliff and marshall, still had to be a heck of a day with the ascent/descent/repeats from TT to Colden to Sky/Gray to Red.

      • #14
        Start with Allen! That way you don't have to worry about it after that, and maybe we can solve the overcrowding issues in the High Peaks too...
        ADK 46*/46 CATS 5/35 FT 4/28 Saranac 0/6 Bristol 6/6

        Comment


        • jrjmurray
          jrjmurray commented
          Editing a comment
          Too late. Even the Allen lookout was pretty crowded when I was up there this summer.

        • bfinan0
          bfinan0 commented
          Editing a comment
          But how many people would come back for peak #2 if that was their first? Introducing a mandatory order to the 46 would probably solve (or at least relocate) the parking and unprepared hiker issues if nothing else.

      • #15
        On the other side of this (not criticizing - everyone should hike them in their own way)...

        20 years after first doing Algonquin + Iroquois + Wright together I returned to do just Wright as a single peak hike.
        I didn't remember much about Wright from the original trip as I was in a hurry at the time; But this time I lingered, enjoyed the view up at Algonquin, sought out and examined the plane wreckage and plaque...A wonderful experience which left a fond and vivid memory of Wright in my mind which lasts to this day (10 years later.)

        I followed up with single peak hikes to other traditionally grouped peaks such as Esther, Dial, Nippletop, Santanoni, Hough, Grace, Dix, as well as others which are often grouped with others (Phelps, Tabletop, Haystack, Marcy) and had similar experiences, and in each case was glad that I gave each individual peak it's own day.

        So far I haven't been able to be consistent with this strategy (Panther was too close to resist on the way to Couch; and likewise for a repeat visit to Giant during my RPR east-west traverse; and I really didn't want to miss the Saddleback "cliffs") but I often thought that a "single-peak 46" would be a worthwhile endeavor. A couple may actually be more difficult this way (Blake, I'm looking at you; and Emmons would need a bushwhack to avoid Donaldson, the extent of which depends on how strict you are with what constitutes NOT hiking a peak.) Others encourage longer and less-standard routes for us casual hikers (Porter from the east, Iroquois from Lake Colden, Whiteface from Connery Pond)


        Wondering if anyone's done this for all 46?

        -Joe

        Comment


        • Makwa
          Makwa commented
          Editing a comment
          I'm sure lots of folks have done it that way. @Learning_The_Trails is taking a similar approach as he hikes the 46 with his daughter. He has broken up a bunch of common pairings into multiple hikes and used different approaches than the majority of aspiring 46ers. I would guess in the long run it will be more memorable for the both of them.

          There is no wrong way to get to 46. It all boils down to personal preference. What is most efficient isn't necessarily the best though it does get you there sooner.
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