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Women of Altitude

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  • Dynotrick
    replied
    mentioned in the local (Rochester) paper with this AP article. (D&C didn't have it online so the link is to the Ithica Journal)

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  • TFR
    replied
    Originally posted by ALGonquin Bob
    Bought the book last week at "Pipe and Book" in LP. I gave it to my wife, who has climbed 3 "High Peaks" with me so far. We have both enjoyed reading it. I met the author at the VFTT Sept. '04 Catskills gathering . From what she told me then, another book may be in the making as well.
    Yes, she's soliciting stories of people's most memorable hikes (and other adventures) in the Catskills. I sent her one, called "This Hike was for the Birds".

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  • ALGonquin Bob
    replied
    Bought the book last week at "Pipe and Book" in LP. I gave it to my wife, who has climbed 3 "High Peaks" with me so far. We have both enjoyed reading it. I met the author at the VFTT Sept. '04 Catskills gathering . From what she told me then, another book may be in the making as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Antlerpeak
    replied
    I picked up a copy today and read half of it already. Just finished Sky's section that's how far into it I've gotten. It is a pretty good read and yes Marta you are impressive. Good job. One other thing a quick skim of the names and there are about five of them that I have run into at times along the trail.

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  • pete_hickey
    replied
    Originally posted by Neil
    One thing sticks out by a country mile: these people usually had to break trail. The TR's seem to all start out with: "No one had been in since..."
    I forget who... it wasn't THAT long ago.... was talking about climbing the sewards in Feb or March, and they were the first ones to sign in that winter.

    The trailbreaking isn't really that new. In doing my winter 46, I had to break trail for probably 75% of them (solo). That was in the 90's. I don't think I've broken trail now, in 4-5 years. I didn't get Marshall until my 5th attempt. Solo trail breaking in deep powder had me giving up 4 times.

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  • Neil
    replied
    I just got myself a copy and after reading Skyclimber's chapter have been flipping back and forth reading the autobiographies and dipping into TR's.

    One thing sticks out by a country mile: these people usually had to break trail. The TR's seem to all start out with: "No one had been in since..."

    They often mention getting underway at the ungodliest hours using flashlights. They didn't exactly have MSR's or Tubbs with the new Vipor crampon either.

    I think I'm going to create a new category of 46. The 46-W(BT) where BT means Broke Trail. I'm up to 2 so far.

    The cannister era has irretrievably given way to the computer era, hasn't it?

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  • pete_hickey
    replied
    I picked up a copy yesterday in Lake Placid, at Bookstore Plus, where they have a bunch of autographed copies.

    Unfortunately, I haven't been able to read it. My wife grabbed it to read about the three who she knows, then continued reading. It looks like she'll see the new year come in while reading that book.

    Oh yeah...about 7 of the women have done trailwork with us.

    At the end, it lists three women who did the winter 46 during the canister period, but their story is not included. One of them, is Itty-Bitty (Margureite). Oddly enough, Cantdog and I met her at her at 'the Hostel' the night before I picked up the book. Oh yeah.. She's also done trailwork with us.

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  • Shewolf
    replied
    Originally posted by hawk
    I think I'm going to be sick. :roll:
    Ditto....

    However, I just added this book to my Christmas "wish list". I'm really hoping someone gets it for me...if not, I know what I'll be shopping for the day after Christmas!

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  • hawk
    replied
    Originally posted by Neil
    I can see it now. I'm sitting in a rocker, a blank stare in my eye and a trembling chin. A comforter on my lap keeps me warm in the overheated room while Tim reads aloud how Skyclimber searched for the cannister on Seward. Suddnely I break wind and crack a demented smile. Then I walk out the door and lay down in the Ausable River for one minute before heading up Sentinel dressed in a business suit.

    I think I'm going to be sick. :roll:

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  • TFR
    replied
    Originally posted by pete_hickey
    Wayne said, "Dig here." We dug, and about 2 feet down we found the canister.


    I've seen pictures of canisters at ground level, but that takes the cake!

    One of the intros to the book is written by none other than Pete Fish, and it's hysterical! He is very blunt (as usual) and none too kind towards men in his remarks!

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  • pete_hickey
    replied
    Originally posted by Skyclimber
    In all seriousness though, "if you didn't find and sign the canister, you didn't always, get to count, the climb."
    I remember climbing Seward... FOrtunately, we met Wayne R on the summit ridge. The summit of seward was bare and bald. Maybe a few tips of trees stuck out several inches from the snow. Wayne said, "Dig here." We dug, and about 2 feet down we found the canister. No way could we have found it without Wayne.

    The book. I have to pick it up the next time I'm down there. There are chapters about several people I know.

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  • Skyclimber
    replied
    Originally posted by Neil
    I can see it now. I'm sitting in a rocker, a blank stare in my eye and a trembling chin. A comforter on my lap keeps me warm in the overheated room while Tim reads aloud how Skyclimber searched for the cannister on Seward. Suddnely I break wind and crack a demented smile. Then I walk out the door and lay down in the Ausable River for one minute before heading up Sentinel dressed in a business suit.
    Ya then just wait until Part 2 of Skyclimber searching for the Seward canister, in Judy King's chapter! Bring on the tissues.

    In all seriousness though, "if you didn't find and sign the canister, you didn't always, get to count, the climb."
    Last edited by Skyclimber; 12-13-2005, 12:09 AM.

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  • Neil
    replied
    I can see it now. I'm sitting in a rocker, a blank stare in my eye and a trembling chin. A comforter on my lap keeps me warm in the overheated room while Tim reads aloud how Skyclimber searched for the cannister on Seward. Suddnely I break wind and crack a demented smile. Then I walk out the door and lay down in the Ausable River for one minute before heading up Sentinel dressed in a business suit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mavs00
    replied
    I'm gonna get a copy too. I hope it get's me in touch with my feminine side.

    Also, I plan to read the stories aloud to Neil at the winter gathering, making sure to overtly gush and marvel at these fine lady's accomplishments, while simultaneously chiding him for his lack thereof.

    If I had any pride, I might even feel a little touch underachieving myself. Naaaaaah.......... It's better to be an underachieving loser, that way, I'll never be disappointed in myself .

    In all seriousness, Congrats Sky, your story is well worthy publishing.

    Leave a comment:


  • hillman1
    replied
    I also bought it as a gift, then started reading it. It's good right from the intro.

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