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  • mastergrasshopper
    commented on 's reply
    from south
    small pull off on right, 1/4 mile before bridge.
    very small (2 car ) pull off on left at base of RUGGED road just before bridge, just up road is start of main low water grace trail also a campsite and room for 3 HIGH clearance vehicles.
    just past bridge is a pull off on right with room for 7-8 cars. Directly across road is a path / washed out road to another campsite and start of high water path

  • Groundpounder
    commented on 's reply
    I've passed the EIB tests (Army) for both night and day land navigation, but it has been a while. Back then I was completely focused on my task. When I hike, half the time I'm daydreaming or thinking of random things...which is one of the things I enjoy about hiking, to be honest!

    Trying to navigate from where you think you are versus where you actually are can lead to its own set of problems (where a GPS would come in handy, to pinpoint a current location). I really don't have a desire to find myself in an unintended bushwhack. I'm certain I could make my own way out, eventually, without a need for rescue. Lord knows I carry enough crap in my daypack that I'm sure I'd be fine. However, I've read of much of the talk about multiple/confusing herd paths in the area over the years, so for now I feel better staying away. Maybe I'll study the maps more closely and venture in there at some point, maybe not. I'm not focused on any kind of list anymore, so it's possible that one day I'll just give it a shot....and then will probably realize that it wasn't a big deal after all.

    Also, where does everyone park when they go in that way? Coming from the south on 73, is it the small roadside pull off just past the bridge?

  • mastergrasshopper
    commented on 's reply
    meters are ok I hike with neil
    800 = yes very nice
    also the full east ridge of Dix
    if you cross over to ridge from 864 to end of ridge there is a small bump just off to south that has open rock and lines up perfectly with Dix beckhorn slide.
    further up ridge there are some 60 ft cliffs with incredible views of Dix range up close.

  • mastergrasshopper
    commented on 's reply
    Kevin what is this GPS ? you speak of ? free printed paper map, even metric and a cheap plastic compass seem to work pretty well.

  • mastergrasshopper
    commented on 's reply
    always wondered that about the sun
    one time I did a compass demo with kids and they made floating compasses out of a magnetized needle in a foam noodle in a bowl of water.
    After I was done I threw magnet in with my main compass. the next hike was a bushwhack. Went west all day. At the end of the day I wanted to go home and pulled out compass and it showed east towards the setting sun. My son told me Dad the compass is always right ( ie hypothermia / confusion always believe the compass ), I told him the sun always is right we will turn our backs to the sun and follow our shadows home. When I got back to the truck I realized what had happened and used the same magnet to get my compass to reverse back to normal.

  • DennisK
    replied
    Last summer, over two trips, I hiked through the canyon from both the southern and northern approaches, During the latter I did a side trip to bump 864. I was able to stay in the canyon throughout, except for a waist-high pond at about 600m elevation which necessitated a steep climb up the east bank. Plenty of scrambling and boulder hopping. A gorgeous area. (The tips from MG and TCD were appreciated)

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  • Old Hunter
    replied
    Groundpounder-you don't even need the map, just compass, if you 1. know which way to return to the road via bushwack if that's what it takes and 2. or know which side of the river you are on-it leads to the road. 3. and the sun comes up in the east and sets in the west.
    When disoriented, STOP, drink, eat, rest, gather your thoughts...then check the sun or compass...and head home.

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  • CatskillKev
    commented on 's reply
    To have zoned out and lost is better than to ever use a GPS. Thanks.

  • CatskillKev
    commented on 's reply
    I guess you guys have been "forced" into accepting the meters in this area.

  • Learning The Trails
    commented on 's reply
    Dude, go on CalTopo and print some maps and take this approach to Grace.
    It's my favorite approach that we've done. So much water! It's such a pulchritudinous area!
    The water crossings are marked with cairns. The campsites along the trail are marked as well. After the last campsite, the climb to Grace begins and the trail is very obvious.

    No doubt, you have to pay close attention in front of you... we followed the wrong herd path right off the rip and ended up on the wrong side of Shoebox Falls. We went a little further upstream and crossed the water and linked right back up with the trail. Luckily, that was only a minor issue.

    I know that you have a long drive... Consider Sharp Bridge as a home base for this hike.

    This route is front and center in regards to my personal "I need to get back there!" List. Once everything calms down in a year or so, I'd be happy to join you (and anyone else interested). I'll even bring the Garmin!

  • Groundpounder
    replied
    This is an area I've long wanted to explore, but being an outsider with a 7 hour drive to get there, I've not wanted to get in there and get turned around. I don't own a GPS, just maps and a compass. Even still, sometimes all it takes is zoning out for a couple of minutes to completely lose one's bearings. Unless the area gets some kind of rudimentary markings I'll probably never visit. I don't want to end up having all of you in here poking fun at me for having to survive on salamanders

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  • tcd
    replied
    GK, great photo!

    Thanks, MG for the details! Been up to 716 and on up to 864 a few times. 864 is a great summit! I have also been over to the neighboring 800 (SW of 864) which has lots of cliffs on its south side.

    MTV, a couple easier bushwhacks closer to route 73 are to follow the Twin Pond drainage down to the N Fork path, and also to go out to Rhododendron Pond and then bushwhack down to the S Fork path.

    All lots of fun; unlimited exploration in that area!

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  • mastergrasshopper
    replied
    hi all
    MAP / Compass follow your self along matching terrain to map.
    just last year I spent a day revisiting all trails before meeting with Neil ( left one car at stone bridge 73 ) to bushwhack from Westmill up over Grace's nose and down to shoebox falls.
    I was amazed at use
    I was amazed that they put sign in kiosks all over the place ( also on herd path along south fork of Boquet )
    to TCD's point if you sign in then some signs / maps would be nice.
    Anyways
    LOOK at map
    locate Shoebox falls
    next is straight section of river and main grace path on north side ( right )
    on map you see huge flat area almost a rectangle 1/3 mile long by 1/4 mile wide.
    that was a huge !!! beaver pond 25 years ago, a lake.
    the path is up above that flat area with small cliffs on your right. the cliffs are part of a small mountain with a high point off 642 meters.
    I named this mountain reindeer mountain because the top is semi open rock covered in mats of grey and sea foam green reindeer moss.
    1/2 way along the old beaver flat, ( the beavers all moved upstream because the dam would break every spring ), the path has a right fork blocked by a few branches.
    the way straight is main Grace herd path and drops down to cross N. fork. The way right goes to a small overlook and camp site. There is a nice waterfall and pool.
    the path is now faint and right next to straight rocky section of N. fork. the stream makes a left turn and there is a long still water section. right at this point you can climb up 642 " reindeer " mountain to grey open rock cliffs that face west with fantastic view of Dix range up close. I have camped up there to see Dix range lit up by early morning sun.
    If you cross N. Fork just past falls, ( rocky section ) you can climb ridge / mountain that creates the big bend of N.Fork. there are 2 high points 716 >642 summit. This is "sandbar " mountain as down the other side leads to a horseshoe bend of N. Fork and shallow crossing up to main Dix trail.
    If you follow N. Fork past still water you will come to canyon / cliffs. In the winter when all is frozen you can stay with stream most of way, always exit to right twin pond side of stream. there are small cliffs that in the winter have huge icicles. You can follow this all the way up to Dix trail near noonmark intersection. The left side has huge cliffs.
    Sandbar mountain is a long ridge that has long stretches of open rock and a great bushwhack.
    this is one small section of area and trails
    happy exploring
    MG





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  • Gregory Karl
    replied
    Click image for larger version

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ID:	507837I've used the trail to the right and traveled through that canyon on the North Fork in both directions. In going S to N toward the Dix Trail I eventually reached a place in the narrows that would have required wading in waist deep water to proceed (not to mention several fun scrambles under boulders). Each time through I gave up on staying in the river and ascended to the top of the cliffs on the E side, then descended back toward the water when it looked practical. In the N, near the Dix Trail, there are some beautiful flumes and falls in narrow channels that made it impossible to stay right by the water. But while going S on the E side of the river I kept descending steeply to the bank to get a look at the falls and flumes. It was Mastergrasshopper who got me interested in that canyon.
    Last edited by Gregory Karl; 07-29-2020, 08:11 PM.

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  • FlyFishingandBeer
    replied
    If I'm thinking of the same possibly illegal site that TCD is referring to, the HP essentially goes right through the middle of it. This was the first of my navigational woes on my first trip back there, because somebody had set up a fairly large, sprawling encampment in that spot, and there's a slight split where another trail veers off to the right closer to the river before petering out in some open woods. I kept thinking "why in the actual F would this whole trail just lead to a campsite?" It didn't.

    The legal campsite back closer to the start that overlooks the river is still very much around and in use, and that section of the trail is a complete hairball of useless loops and side paths to nowhere (nowhere relevant to me anyway). As was suggested in a previous thread about this route, especially if you'll be exiting in the dark, be ready to M&C nav while using the trails as a point of reference. If you're a "normal" hiker and won't be returning well after dark in a monsoon, just remember to turn around now and then when you come to junctions so you'll remember your way out.

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