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Owls Head trailhead (the one near Cascade Pass) closed on weekends

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  • All Downhill From Here
    replied
    People ruined it for the same reason that groups take over leantos, that guys from Quebec run for-pay, guided trips to the HP, and why people don't bury their TP. Because F you, that's why.

    Leave a comment:


  • Makwa
    commented on 's reply
    We discussed that article when it came out but it's certainly worth resurrecting the topic as it pertains to this situation.

    http://www.adkhighpeaks.com/forums/f...atural-wonders

  • BrianH
    replied
    This is a very interesting article:

    https://theringer.com/instagram-geot...s-f65b529d5e28

    Leave a comment:


  • MJK
    replied
    Originally posted by tcd View Post
    I used to get upset at this, or think bad things about these folks. But I think you have to try to have "the most charitable assumption." The assumptions come in a set of three, as many things do. The most charitable assumption is that these folks are simply self-absorbed, and unaware of their surroundings. (#2 is that they are aware, but stupid. #3 is that they are aware and intelligent, but mean-spirited. So I go with #1.)
    I probably subscribe to #2, which is formalized as Hanlon's razor: "​Never attribute to malice that which is adequately explained by stupidity" But either 1,2, or 3 the end result is the same. And I'm not sure if all the readers of this thread are understanding that the current weekdays only policy is just throwing a bone: "the landowner has informed DEC the trail will be closed for public use at the end of this hiking season." The trail is gone.

    Originally posted by DSettahr View Post

    An example of perceived social norms might be someone saying "I see other cars parked in a way that blocks traffic, so it must be the normal thing to do. If everyone else does it, it's OK for me to do it too."
    This is very similar to the broken windows theory of law enforcement( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broken_windows_theory ), and the solution proposed there is quick and merciless enforcement of the laws. I've seen roads blocked when parking lots were full and I've seen gates blocked when there was plenty of space to park around them. And in large groups there is a problem where no one individual feels they are accountable. I think some people need to be educated and some people need to be smacked.

    Last edited by MJK; 06-21-2017, 11:32 PM. Reason: genuinely sorry to be an annoying new poster with so many opinions

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  • cfraimondo
    replied
    It's a shame it came to this. I can respect the land owners' wishes, given how some people have no respect for other's property. However, I wish the state had a way to purchase land to make this all public. Owl's Head is the perfect trail to really capture the Adirondack beauty to those inexperienced in the High Peaks. A lot of reward for little effort. I've enjoyed this trail multiple times, due to the amazing views from on top, watching rock climbing lessons, natural blueberry bushes on top, and introducing my children to the High Peaks. I hope everyone will stick to weekdays only and not make a bad situation worse.

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  • DSettahr
    replied
    Originally posted by MJK View Post
    Doesn't the specific access issue here really pale in comparison to the big picture, i.e. what sort of low breed ******* blocks someone's driveway? Is it just ignorance? Obliviousness? Stubborn tourists with no contingency plan? I've seen vehicles parked right in front of gated roads with plenty of room around to not block the gate, suggesting a severe lack of education. Many, many access points risk being lost if this selfish ignorance becomes the norm.
    The Theory of Planned Behavior can be used to explain a lot of this. In a nutshell, the Theory of Planned Behavior states that our behavioral intentions, and thus our actual behaviors, are largely a product of three factors: Our attitudes towards specific behavioral choices, our perceived social norms, and our perceived behavioral control (i.e., how easy it will be for us to engage in specific behaviors).

    An example of attitude might be someone saying "I want to do this hike no matter what. It's the one I've had planned and spent the past few days getting excited about," and refusing to modify plans to find another hike. An example of perceived social norms might be someone saying "I see other cars parked in a way that blocks traffic, so it must be the normal thing to do. If everyone else does it, it's OK for me to do it too." An lastly, an example of behavioral control might be someone saying "Finding another hike means I have to plan it, drive there, worry that all of the parking spots there will be taken also, get there late so that I have less daylight to do the hike, etc. It's a lot easier for me to just park alongside the road here even if that does mean inconveniencing someone else."

    You put all of those thoughts together and it's easy to see why some people would do this. To be clear, I'm not justifying this sort of behavior, just attempting to explain why some people engage in it.

    The obvious solution to a lot of this would be getting hikers to plan things better in advance- understanding the possible issues with any hike, having a Plan B ready to go the moment it becomes clear that Plan A isn't feasible, etc. Easier said than done, unfortunately.

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  • dundee
    replied
    Originally posted by tcd View Post
    Sadly, that is more an issue today than it used to be. More and more folks wandering around with their faces buried in their phones, behaving as though they were the only person in the world.

    I used to get upset at this, or think bad things about these folks. But I think you have to try to have "the most charitable assumption." The assumptions come in a set of three, as many things do. The most charitable assumption is that these folks are simply self-absorbed, and unaware of their surroundings. (#2 is that they are aware, but stupid. #3 is that they are aware and intelligent, but mean-spirited. So I go with #1.)
    Don't forget apathy.

    Leave a comment:


  • tcd
    replied
    Sadly, that is more an issue today than it used to be. More and more folks wandering around with their faces buried in their phones, behaving as though they were the only person in the world.

    I used to get upset at this, or think bad things about these folks. But I think you have to try to have "the most charitable assumption." The assumptions come in a set of three, as many things do. The most charitable assumption is that these folks are simply self-absorbed, and unaware of their surroundings. (#2 is that they are aware, but stupid. #3 is that they are aware and intelligent, but mean-spirited. So I go with #1.)

    Leave a comment:


  • autochromatica
    commented on 's reply
    Yes, that is the issue.

  • MJK
    replied
    Doesn't the specific access issue here really pale in comparison to the big picture, i.e. what sort of low breed ******* blocks someone's driveway? Is it just ignorance? Obliviousness? Stubborn tourists with no contingency plan? I've seen vehicles parked right in front of gated roads with plenty of room around to not block the gate, suggesting a severe lack of education. Many, many access points risk being lost if this selfish ignorance becomes the norm.

    Leave a comment:


  • tgoodwin
    replied
    No, the closure includes the section of trail on private land. Once this season is over, this route is permanently closed. This is not just a parking restriction. That said, there is great interest in developing a new route from the Rt. 73 side, but it won't happen immediately.

    Leave a comment:


  • MTVhike
    replied
    A few years ago, when I was looking for a place to build, the three properties at the very end of OHLane (where the circle is) were for sale. I seriously considered purchasing one; I wish I had. Question: can one walk up the lane and it's continuation to state land?

    Leave a comment:


  • 2505
    replied
    Sad. Another example of the ADKs being loved to death. Ignorance and/or arrogance on the part of some visitors: They either don't get it or don't believe rules apply to them.

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  • tgoodwin
    replied
    Here is a photo of the actual sign, located right at Rt. 73. The sign seems to indicate that mid-week parking must be on the highway, while no use is permitted on weekends. Click image for larger version

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  • Makwa
    commented on 's reply
    Trail Boss... I think the pic in post #8 is fixed now even though I believe you have figured out the correct info. One last thought... drop down to street level on Google Earth and take a peek at where Owls Head Lane intersects Rte 73. There appears to be a few parking spaces about 100 feet off the highway just to the left (north) of where the Lane takes a sharp turn there. Can't quite tell if it's OK to park there but that could explain the trail being drawn from 73. I suppose you could park on Rte 73 in the narrow shoulders nearby as well but I would imagine 99% of people drive up to where the trail signage/ parking is.
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