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Views from Mt. Marcy

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  • Views from Mt. Marcy

    Does anyone know if it is possible to see Mt. Washington (New Hampshire) from Mt. Marcy? If so, I believe I was able to see it on 11/7/16. In the distance, well past the Green Mountains, there was a snow capped peak visible.

  • #2
    Check this out. http://www.accuweather.com/en/weathe...t-a-view/17243

    Discusses view from Mt. Washington. I would assume the reverse is true?

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    • #3
      Mount Washington is not something that stands out as obvious. I have to admit that I haven't tried too hard.
      I would suggest figuring out the bearing to it before you go.

      Also, t46psk, a forum members, did an internship at the Mt Washington Observatory and I recall him saying somewhere that Marcy from Washington is a standard reference to gauge range of visibility.

      Don

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      • #4
        Unlikely.

        ​Washington lies 130 miles east of Marcy at a bearing of 84.3 degrees.

        ​The ridge formed by Stark, Ellen, and Abraham, in Vermont, lies along the same bearing at a distance of 50 miles.

        ​Bring less than half the distance and of substantial height, the ridge will appear on the horizon and obscure peaks behind it. See this example in Peakfinder:
        https://www.peakfinder.org/?lat=44.1...=mount%20marcy

        ​Given a crystal clear day, and a set of binoculars, you might see Mount Moosilauke which lies ~104 miles away. Maybe.

        ​In my experience, it's tough to discern peaks beyond 50 miles away. Here's an example of the view from Mount Marcy looking west at the horizon. The peaks in this photo are ~42 miles away.


        Peaks on the horizon are 42 miles away. by Taras D, on Flickr

        ​The photo corresponds to what Peakfinder predicts one would see on the horizon.
        https://www.peakfinder.org/?lat=44.1...=mount%20marcy

        Looking for Views!

        Comment


        • #5
          I have seen Mt. Moosilauke on several occasions from Marcy and Haystack without binoculars. I also know that Mt. Washington should be visible, although I can't remember a specific time that I have seen it. Definitely more visible when capped with snow.

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          • #6
            On April 7, 2004, I shot a picture toward the East from the summit of Cascade and I think I saw Mt. Washington. At least, there is one white spot in the extreme distance. I had a rather poor camera (only 1200 x 1600 pixels). But, according to a program called "Heywhatsthat", Mt. Washington should be visible from the summit of Cascade at an azimuth of 87 (127 miles away)
            Mike

            ADK 46r #8003; 6W
            2nd round: 16
            SL6r #596
            Catskill 3500 21/39; 11W

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            • #7
              Whiteface, Cascade & Porter, Giant & RPR ... all should provide a teeny-tiny glimpse of a microscopic patch of reflected light off Washington's snow-covered summit when the sun hits it at just the right angle. ​If that passes for "seeing Washington", well, so be it.

              ​Here's the view west from Washington.
              https://www.peakfinder.org/?lat=44.2...t%20washington



              FWIW, I scoured my collection of photos taken from the summits of Whiteface, Marcy, RPR, and Cascade in the hope of finding something, anything, with a glimpse of the elusive Mount Washington. Bupkis! Even on a crazy-clear day in winter on Marcy with undercast, nothing pops up above the cloud deck on the horizon.

              For future Washington hunters, here's where it should be (click image to magnify):



              The photo above was cropped from a 16 MPx image taken from atop Marcy this past September. To get an idea of its magnification level, it's cropped from a photo similar to this one.


              Charles and Johns Brook Valley by Taras D, on Flickr
              Looking for Views!

              Comment


              • #8
                I think that for any hope of seeing Mt. Washington from the 'Dacks, Washington would have to be snow covered and in the afternoon on a very clear day. Also, no snow on any other mountains.
                Mike

                ADK 46r #8003; 6W
                2nd round: 16
                SL6r #596
                Catskill 3500 21/39; 11W

                Comment


                • #9
                  and the answer is YES

                  "On Wednesday, January 14, we posted a picture to our Facebook page that described how we could see 120 miles in all directions that day. Since then we have had a few emails, Facebook comments, and private messages asking what the farthest distance is we can see, and what might be the farthest distance you can see in general. For weather stations like ours, we use visibility markers with known distances around the horizon (in the past using geometry and trigonometry but more recently using computer software). Using these points as reference, the farthest distance that we report is 130 miles. For example, on a clear day we can easily see Mt. Marcy (131 miles) and Whiteface (129 miles) in NY state. "

                  https://www.mountwashington.org/expe...s.aspx?id=8104
                  8000m 0/14

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Haha! Can one theoretically see it? Depending on what you mean by "see it", sure. Is one likely to see it? Practically speaking, no.

                    Dave posted the same question on VFTT where member "SkiGuy" shared this observation made by someone working at the weather station atop Washington:
                    http://www.accuweather.com/en/weathe...t-a-view/17243

                    Now let's examine the evidence presented by the Accuweather article. Let's start with the viewing conditions:

                    ... there was one particular aspect that was extremely noteworthy: the visibility. In all my time here on the summit (which totals about 2 years if you count my internship back in 2006), I have never seen visibility this good.
                    In addition, it was backlit by sunset so the equivalent conditions for Marcy (to see Washington) would be sunrise (and rare weather).

                    Here's the last photo in the article, from the Accuweather site, with an arrow pointing to the ridge formed by Stark, Ellen, and Abraham in Vermont. The arrow points to a vanishingly small bump that corresponds to Marcy's location (50 miles farther west from Stark). Now you know where Marcy is supposed to be.

                    http://www.bmclark.org/accuwx_blog/102508/IMG_6830.JPG

                    Now let's look at the first image in the article which is a better representation of what you'll actually see (in the same optimal viewing conditions). You now know where to find Marcy (far left of Camel's Hump along the Stark/Ellen/Abraham ridge) so go find Marcy. Good luck!

                    http://www.bmclark.org/accuwx_blog/102508/IMG_6833.JPG


                    Seeing Mount Washington from Mount Marcy requires equivalent optimal viewing conditions. You might get lucky. It can happen. Just like it can happen that you might see the Northern Lights from Washington, D.C. ... just don't go there expecting to see them.


                    ​PS
                    ​As per Peakfinder and Accuweather's diagram, you'll a better chance of seeing Washington from the summit of Whiteface, Cascade, or Giant.
                    Last edited by Trail Boss; 11-12-2016, 07:00 PM.
                    Looking for Views!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      FYI, I did not know you could see Marcy from Washington before starting to read this thread BUT I have seen Whiteface from the summit of Washington once before and I remembered having read on the Mt Washington observatory web site that you could see as far away to the East to Whiteface so I was hopeful you can see Marcy from Washington and conversely. I would add that it is much easier to see Whiteface cos it stands by itself and as mentioned by many you need perfect lighting condition i.e not dust or humidity.

                      This is an interesting topic. So the likelyhood of seeing either Washington from Marcy and Marcy from Washington is very low but not impossible, in winter it must be very cold and hopefully Lake Champlain will be frozen.
                      8000m 0/14

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                      • #12
                        I was at the mountain wanderer bookshop in Lincoln, NH (awesome place) and the guy noticed me going through some Adirondack maps and books and we got talking. Apparently from the top of Washington 14 high peaks are visible on a really good day. Since I was hiking the kinsmans and cannon that day, he told me that dix range should be visible between the Lincoln gap in VT. I've gotta get a good pair of binoculars...
                        ADK - 35/46
                        Whites - 25/48
                        North East - 68/115
                        Catskills - 9/35

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                        • #13
                          I can vouch for the perfect weather. The sky was crystal clear. There was no haze at all. It was one of the best viewing days I have ever seen. There was only a dusting of snow on the surrounding peaks. Lower elevation peaks had no snow at all. And, very clearly, well past the Green Mountains, there was a snow topped peak on the horizon.

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                          • Trail Boss
                            Trail Boss commented
                            Editing a comment
                            Too bad you didn't get a photo of it, for posterity, because it was a rare occurrence.

                        • #14
                          I consider it a good day when I can see Washington from Washington, and Marcy from Marcy, even this is not always easy to do.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Originally posted by Hear the Footsteps View Post
                            Mount Washington is not something that stands out as obvious. I have to admit that I haven't tried too hard.
                            I would suggest figuring out the bearing to it before you go.

                            Also, t46psk, a forum members, did an internship at the Mt Washington Observatory and I recall him saying somewhere that Marcy from Washington is a standard reference to gauge range of visibility.

                            Don
                            Wow, I can't believe you remember me mentioning that somewhere, but you are correct. Mt. Marcy is used as a reference gauge for visibility, as is Whiteface, I believe they are in the 130 miles away range. I never saw them myself, my internship was a summer one, and haze always kept visibility lower than 100 miles or so.

                            The reason that Mt. Marcy is more often seen from Washington and not visa versa might have to do with the relative heights of each peak, and their relative locations. Based on the height of each mountain, and the Earths curvature I think it's theoretically possible to see Marcy from Washington and visa versa from maybe 160 miles away or so. However, because Mt. Washington is higher, I think it is easier to see, or at least distinguish Marcy, than it is from the other direction, i.e., you see a greater percentage of Mt. Marcy from Washington than you do of Washington (don't quote me though, I'm not an expert in optics and optical perception). Also, the time of day which it is likely to be visible matters, for example, on average it's hazier during the morning when viewing Mt. Washington from Marcy would be easiest, making seeing Washington from Marcy less likely.

                            Anyway, a fresh coat of snow on Washington would certainly could make it easier to distinguish on the horizon.

                            -Ted

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