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  • Hiker's body found

    Sad ending.
    Phil
    Adirondack Explorer
    www.adirondackexplorer.org

  • #2
    How awful, especially for the hikers who discovered his body. I just couldn't imagine, finding a corpse at the end of a beautiful hike! Nothing like putting an nightmare of a memory to this peak for the hikers. :( Sad this man had to end his life and involve others in the process.
    It is easier to become a Forty Sixer than to be one. The art of the being is to keep one's sense of wonder after the excitement of the game is over. ...”There are few experiences in life that do not need to be expressed in words. Becoming a Forty-Sixer is one... How to be one is up to the individual.”

    Paul Jamieson Class of '58

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    • #3
      Must have been awful finding something like that. Given the location the body was found I wonder if a canine (hiking partner) might have been part of the crew that found the body.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Alpine1 View Post
        Must have been awful finding something like that. Given the location the body was found I wonder if a canine (hiking partner) might have been part of the crew that found the body.
        yeah, very sad ending to that story. One of the comments on the linked article said their were dogs in the group that found him.

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        • #5
          It seems strange that the initial search that the rangers did ........I believe i read that they used dogs to search. . Its hard to believe that he wasn't found back then by the dogs.
          ADK's HIGH PEAKS
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          "Every Mountiain top is within reach if you just keep climbing."
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          • #6
            Sad ending indeed. Condolences to the family.
            "The forest is the poor man's overcoat. " Old Northeastern Proverb

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            • #7
              A tragic ending to a man's life, but a very selfish and unthinking way to do it that involved all those in SAR and the people who had to see him that way. I wonder how he could have been missed during the initial search that close to the trailhead and pond.
              "It's a beautiful day!" - Fellow hiker Shin Murnane's (5785W) last words at Marcy Dam 3/28/09
              46er #5357W
              Check out my "MOUNTAIN BLOG" http://bvanhise.blogspot.com/ AND ALGonquin Bob's Paddle Guide

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              • #8
                He could of perhaps did it after the initial search... Perhaps he was living in the woods for a bit, collecting his thoughts when the initial search was going on... Assuming this was suicide and not a crime.

                Jay

                Life is a short, warm moment
                And death is a long cold rest.
                You get your chance to try in the twinkling of an eye:
                Eighty years, with luck, or even less.
                -Pink Floyd

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ALGonquin Bob View Post
                  A tragic ending to a man's life, but a very selfish and unthinking way to do it that involved all those in SAR and the people who had to see him that way.
                  When Guy Waterman committed suicide on Franconia Ridge someone declared it to be the ultimate act of littering.

                  However, before blaming the dead I would first consider how mentally ill and/or distressed a person would have to be in order to take their own life. Still, in the current case a tremendous amount of manpower and resources were allocated to finding this man. Resources that could have been used elsewhere.

                  I wonder if one day, while bushwhacking, I will ever find human remains. The odds of that are of course vanishingly small.

                  I wonder how he could have been missed during the initial search that close to the trailhead and pond.
                  Very easily. Small needle relative to very big haystack.

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                  • #10
                    I wonder if one day, while bushwhacking, I will ever find human remains. The odds of that are of course vanishingly small.
                    I think the same thing. I roam the woods around me and you find the strangest signs of humanity in the odd places. I once bushwacked to a peak in the catskills once, and while hanging out at the summit, I happen to lift a rock next to a tree on the highest bump I could find and I found a toothbrush pushed into the ground and hidden by the flat rock, truly in the middle of nowhere. And of course, you find sometimes old beer bottles from way back when when roaming the hills.... signs that you're not the first one to go explore the area..

                    I expect to find floating bodies too when I'm out kayaking... but as of yet, I've only found dead fish and once a dead deer...

                    Jay

                    Life is a short, warm moment
                    And death is a long cold rest.
                    You get your chance to try in the twinkling of an eye:
                    Eighty years, with luck, or even less.
                    -Pink Floyd

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by ALGonquin Bob View Post
                      A tragic ending to a man's life, but a very selfish and unthinking way to do it that involved all those in SAR and the people who had to see him that way.
                      Maybe thats better than having your wife/kids/family finding you that way.

                      Originally posted by Neil View Post
                      I wonder if one day, while bushwhacking, I will ever find human remains. The odds of that are of course vanishingly small.
                      There are of course those who are still missing, but presumed dead. The odds of discovering some of these remains are about equal with finding any number of long lost things in the bush. Doug Legg comes to mind first. If you could find him, you'd be doing something.

                      Remember those hikers who found the Cessna 206 on Boreas? It was there 6 years with the remains of the pilot still strapped in when they accidentally discovered it. A massive search effort failed to locate it, and obviously a plane is much larger than a person. Thats not the only plane I know of that was missed in a search only to be later found by someone bushwhacking well after the search ended. You never know what you might find out there.

                      Sad story though. I was waiting to hear some resolution on it, but this is not what I had speculated had happened. My thoughts are with all those who were involved with this unfortunate incident.
                      Adopt a natural resource. Give back.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by ALGonquin Bob View Post
                        I wonder how he could have been missed during the initial search that close to the trailhead and pond.
                        Maybe with the leaves down after the last storm he was a bit easier to see. Sad end to the story either way.
                        George
                        18/46

                        "Because in the end, you won't remember the time you spent working in the office or mowing your lawn. Climb that goddamn mountain." - Jack Kerouac

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Neil View Post
                          However, before blaming the dead I would first consider how mentally ill and/or distressed a person would have to be in order to take their own life. Still, in the current case a tremendous amount of manpower and resources were allocated to finding this man. Resources that could have been used elsewhere.
                          As someone who was involved in two days of such searches, I will give my 2c worth.
                          (NOTE: My opinions here do NOT reflect those of my SAR team; they are just my own).

                          First, I agree with Neil. Nobody can comprehend Scott Haworth's state of mind and the psychological pain he was going through which drove him to make this final, fatal decision. I feel so sorry for his friends and family. I have to say, I find it puzzling why he decided to cash a check first and go to the grocery store. Perhaps he did not have suicidal intentions then? Well, I guess only he knew.

                          Second, regarding utilization of resources. I understand this sentiment. The searches not only involved many resources for long periods of time, but as much of it involved bushwhacking through very difficult terrain, there was also a potential for injury among the searchers (be they rangers or SAR team members). However, in >>my<< mind and considering that SAR is what I volunteered to do, my mindset was to help do something that, in the end, would give SH's family and friends some sense of closure. Regardless of whether SH was missing due to some mishap or (in this case) to commit suicide, I knew there were loved ones "back home" very stressed and just wanting a sense of closure and wanting SH to be back with them.

                          Regardless of any discomfort I had to deal with on these SARs, helping in some way to benefit SH's loved ones back home was what drove me; I have no misgivings about those days. And though these are solely my opinions, I am sure there other SAR team members and rangers who feel the same.

                          Very easily. Small needle relative to very big haystack.
                          Air-scent dogs, like grid searches, still have limited effectiveness. I do not know to what extent dogs were used on the searches of SH. The use and effectiveness of dogs is not as easy or fool-proof some people think.
                          We are closer now than we were five minutes ago

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ALGonquin Bob View Post
                            A tragic ending to a man's life, but a very selfish and unthinking way to do it that involved all those in SAR and the people who had to see him that way. I wonder how he could have been missed during the initial search that close to the trailhead and pond.
                            Forgive me, but your statement is either unkind or you lack exerience and knowledge with mental illness. I will go with the latter. It is easy to think about the many people who fight for their lives only to succumb to a terrible disease. Therefore it might be easy to think that it is selfish for a healthy person to throw away his life and to inconvenience a whole bunch of people. To me, he passed away from another terrible disease. Depression is particularly sneaky, because many times it bears few signs to the outside world. He reportedly was a quiet guy, so his friends and family may not have realized that there was anything different.
                            I am profoundly saddened by his decision to end his own life. I can't help but think how sad it is that there are people who actually think their friends and family are better off without them, and that he may have thought that. Reaching out for help is always a possibility, but this is a disease that many times takes the will to fight for one's life. "Snapping out of it", a technique suggested by many, doesn't work either.
                            I think about how sad that trek into the woods was. How he picked his spot, and how he probably wanted to be found. At least he died on his own terns, in a place he loved, and I hope he didn't suffer (for too long).

                            In between friends and family I know a few Troopers, a couple of Rangers and a few SAR guys. Not once has anyone said to me: "I gotta go on this search, what an inconvenience to my day." It is more that they hope to find the person alive, or if not, that they at least get to bring the body home to the family to provide them with closure and the victim with a proper resting place.
                            That is what makes these guys special. Their own lives and many times their own families take the back seat, so they can help somebody else.
                            It is a sacrifice that everyone that I know makes freely and generously.
                            So please let's not judge here: Don't judge Scott Haworth for taking his own life, but rather keep him in your thoughts. And for crying out loud let's not go down the :"How could they have missed it, what shotty work" road.
                            As Neil says it truly was a needle in a Haystack they were looking for.
                            My thoughts go out to Scott, his family, and the hikers who found him.
                            Corey D
                            46-R, 34/46W

                            "It looked like the Almighty had once set this vast earth rolling like the sea. And then, in the midst of its maddest flow, bid all the gigantic billows stop and congeal in their places." - J.T. Hadley, the Adirondack, or, Life in the Woods (1849)

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Commissionpoint View Post
                              Maybe thats better than having your wife/kids/family finding you that way.



                              There are of course those who are still missing, but presumed dead. The odds of discovering some of these remains are about equal with finding any number of long lost things in the bush. Doug Legg comes to mind first. If you could find him, you'd be doing something.

                              Remember those hikers who found the Cessna 206 on Boreas? It was there 6 years with the remains of the pilot still strapped in when they accidentally discovered it. A massive search effort failed to locate it, and obviously a plane is much larger than a person. Thats not the only plane I know of that was missed in a search only to be later found by someone bushwhacking well after the search ended. You never know what you might find out there.

                              Sad story though. I was waiting to hear some resolution on it, but this is not what I had speculated had happened. My thoughts are with all those who were involved with this unfortunate incident.
                              A plane in the Five Pond wilderness crashed in 1954 and was not found until 1979. Obscurred by a beaver flow until the beaver dam broke decades later. Finding something that does not move, yell back is visually obvious and is not trying to be found is very difficult in the Eastern woods with our understory.

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