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The Search for the Real First Climbers to Summit Mount Everest

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  • Old Hunter
    replied
    Unless I'm mistaken, they do believe Mallory fell coming down. Unfortunately no one knows how high he did get.

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  • Hear the Footsteps
    replied
    I saw the film. Thanks to Makwa for pointing it out.

    "Lost on Everest" Not the title of the internet article. The internet needs click bait.


    1) They really weren't prepared for the task. Underestimated how physically hard the climb is. None really had the reserves to venture out at the designated spot. Though one of the principles did. And one principle couldn't even make the summit due to health warning signs.

    2) Unprotected downclimb, no ropes. And maybe the terrain and conditions make it impossible to set up a rope. At least the 1999 expedition they showed that they had brought ropes.

    3) Wondered when the main climber unclipped and the Sherpas were calling out it was unsafe ... were the Sherpas kept out of the loop on main guys real intent. I started watching again and caught the words from the Drone operators mouth that using the Drone was the primary objective.

    4) Said they waited for the crowds to leave. 'Had the summit to themselves.' Adds on to the thought that the traffic jam last year is caused by profit motive -- get as many as allowed, get in and out as fast as possible. Cut costs to minimum.

    Didn't watch the 2nd show but it's an on-demand feature on the Cable.

    Don

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  • Makwa
    commented on 's reply
    They did extensive research, mapping, drone recon, and had eyewitness testimony from a few climbers who saw a dead British climber (they knew he was British because they all wear braces... aka suspenders) in a general area in a crack. One guy did a half-assed (and very dangerous) search around the area and found nothing. He concluded that over the years since the eyewitness reports that Irvine was carried/swept further down the mountain... like several thousand feet over the edge of an area that drops precipitously very near the search area. If that is true then it will be all but impossible to ever locate him.

  • Bunchberry
    replied
    So were there any revelations?

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  • Makwa
    commented on 's reply
    Title of the article linked to in my post was, "The Search for the Real First Climbers to Summit Mount Everest—30 Years Before Sir Edmund Hillary".

  • CatskillKev
    replied
    Why the title of this post? Was that their wording? Seems an insult to Sir Edmund and Tenzing.

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  • bikerhiker
    commented on 's reply
    i'm right with you, including that the premise of the documentary was for the search for Irvine but ended up seeming way off in reality. At the point when the show gives you their plan with the summit bid first THEN they look for Irvine on the way back down...yeah. In my mind after knowing that their priority was 1 summit and then 2 irvine, I did feel a little robbed too with the interesting backstory about the original duo and the hope for finding him and the camera. I got the impression the sherpas had no clue they intended to go off-route for the search.
    I think I was actually more impressed with the next hour, with the weather stations and ice and sediment samples.

  • Makwa
    commented on 's reply
    I was disappointed with their effort to look for Irvine. The whole conceit of the expedition and the show was to look for him. They did mountains of research (pun intended), drone recon, and prep but then devoted so little time to actually conducting a search for him that I felt ripped off. I didn't think they were there to summit Everest as their primary goal yet they wasted all their energy doing just that and had zero plan for an exhaustive search of the area they had pinpointed where they thought Irvine was. My god, the guy went off rope and risked his life for the quick scan of the area that he did. I would have assumed they would have fixed anchors and ropes in the area so that a better search could have been conducted safely. I was very surprised.

    Still an amazing show though. The photography was great and the drone footage was awesome. In the end, I love any show about Everest. It is endlessly fascinating to me.

  • bikerhiker
    commented on 's reply
    you nailed it makwa, and that's what I was thinking while watching the show leading up to the "moment": I remember Mallory being found and read up on that years ago but I never heard about them finding Irvine or the camera so that's what I expected to be the outcome of the hour, that would have been ginormous enough news to be memorable.
    With the show exhibiting the toll that just getting to that elevation took on the men in the documentary, I was impressed when the one did actually go off rope looking for Irvine a bit, despite the sherpas' urgings. Still a good watch even without the camera being found.
    Also, seeing the effects this climb had on modern day mountaineers lets one imagine how much harder it must have been for Mallory/Irvine, Tenzing/Hillary, Herzog/Lachenal, etc, and at the same time closer to home made me think again about the Marshalls and Herbert Clark exploring around the adk in their time, without the luxury of Ultra Raptors, trail signs with (maybe off a little bit) mileage, and the Ray Brook DEC number when you are wearing sneaks and shorts in may on Marcy. And the Hungry Hiker once back at the lot.

  • Makwa
    replied
    bumping this up. Shows are on tonight at 9 and 10 for those interested.
    Last edited by Makwa; 06-30-2020, 09:11 PM.

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  • Bunchberry
    replied
    The whole deal is "the second step" which is pictured in this link.

    https://www.tgomagazine.co.uk/inspir...-michael-gill/

    Now there might have been more snow or less snow or more ice or no ice. It is a hard pitch to do sight unseen at altitude in period dress.

    But Mallory was a good climber. This from Wikipedia:

    Geoffrey Winthrop Young, an accomplished mountain climber, held Mallory's ability in awe:

    "His movement in climbing was entirely his own. It contradicted all theory. He would set his foot high against any angle of smooth surface, fold his shoulder to his knee, and flow upward and upright again on an impetuous curve. Whatever may have happened unseen the while between him and the cliff ... the look, and indeed the result, were always the same—a continuous undulating movement so rapid and so powerful that one felt the rock must yield, or disintegrate."

    I feel Mallory must have tried it. He may even fell off it. Maybe he injured himself and fell on the descent. Or maybe he made it to the top and they were exhausted and fell.

    I don't think he looked at it and said "Oh well that looks too hard! Lets go home!"

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  • tcd
    commented on 's reply
    It's hard to know. Some of that side of the mountain is stable snowfields; some of it is glaciers. A body falling into a stable snowfield might just freeze in place, get covered by snow, and still be where it initially fell. A body on a glacier would get carried downhill by the (sometimes very slow) movement of the glacier.

  • tcd
    commented on 's reply
    The story goes: "They were last seen from basecamp 'going strong for the summit' when visibility was lost in the clouds."

    No one knows yet what happened after visibility was lost (except of course the eventual outcome that they died on the mountain).

  • Makwa
    replied
    Just checked the TV listings. There's another Everest doc on at 10 pm after the the one described above. "Expedition Everest" is described on the NatGeo web site as "Just inside Everest's notorious death zone, a team of climate scientists who specialize in extreme weather weigh their next move."

    Leave a comment:


  • Makwa
    commented on 's reply
    I always look forward to these types of shows and hope there will be some big reveal. There never is. Such a newsworthy find would have been reported on when it happened, not in in NatGeo doc months later. But I still enjoy them.

    I don't recall the details of the Mallory expedition but given that they were known to be 800 vertical feet from the summit I would assume there was visual contact (through binoculars or telescope) with them from base camp. Don't know if they were lost in the clouds or weather above that altitude or just plain lost.
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