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Seward in "Lincoln"

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  • Seward in "Lincoln"

    Secretary of State William Henry Seward plays a prominent role in Spielberg's new film about Abraham Lincoln, which I saw last night. It was cool to see a person whose name we are very familiar with brought to life by the excellent David Strathairn. Are there any other High Peak namesakes who have been similarly featured in popular media?
    46/46, 12/48, 58/115
    46-R #6866

  • #2
    I know some of Verplanck COLVIN's (and assistant Mills BLAKE's) adventures as ADK Surveyors would be worthy of a film. Also the adventures of guides like Orson "Old Mountain" PHELPS, William "Bill" NYE and wilderness activist Robert "Bob" MARSHALL might be interesting on screen.

    The rest of the peaks are either Politicians, people involved with the McIntyre Iron Works, authors, botanists, a geologist, a reverend, an army general, a local pioneer/lumberjack and 15yr local girl who got lost.

    Also: Botanist Asa GRAY was an associate of Charles Darwin, subject of the fairly recent motion picture Creation
    Last edited by ScAtTeRbOnE; 11-20-2012, 04:25 PM.
    ADK 46/46 4W CATS 39/39 8W ADK100 63/102 VT35 26/29 FT's 25/29 VT FT's 9/15

    ScAtTeRbOnE's Adventures

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    "We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh and bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun, a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal." John Muir from My First Summer in The Sierra

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ScAtTeRbOnE View Post
      William "Bill" NYE and wilderness activist
      Didn't Bill Nye have his own show: http://www.billnye.com/

      Have not seen the movie yet but a read of "Team of Rivals" will tell you what a prominent roll Seward had.
      Enjoying the journey with my favorite hiking partner.
      Please visit ADKGurl's Blog: 46-High-Peaks

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      • #4
        TR Mountain

        Teddy Roosevelt
        ADK 46er 7350W
        Catskill 35er #2339
        ADK Firetowers 26/28
        ▲RWMS▲

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        • #5
          Originally posted by DackerDan View Post
          Didn't Bill Nye have his own show:
          Yes, and the mountain was named after his research on the NYE Wolf. And also he was good friends with Olympic skier Picabo Street, who was the first one to ski the mountain next door.
          ADK 46/46 4W CATS 39/39 8W ADK100 63/102 VT35 26/29 FT's 25/29 VT FT's 9/15

          ScAtTeRbOnE's Adventures

          sigpic
          "We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh and bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun, a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal." John Muir from My First Summer in The Sierra

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Charlene
            An obscure, but very good film
            called "Gods and Generals"
            I was selected cast for Gods And Generals during my Civil War reenactor days, but I couldn't get the time off work to go to the filming in VA. Long, but well made films, especially interesting to history buffs.


            Originally posted by Charlene
            I am always rather stunned, what with America's military history, that there aren't more places named for your various Gods and Generals.

            No "Lee" Mountain? No "Longstreet" Mountain? No "Sherman" Mountain? And for the love of all things holy.... No Grant Mountain?
            I take it your kidding about this...
            I hiked the Vermont Presidentials in the Breadloaf Wilderness of the GMNF this year. One of the mountains was Mt Grant (after Gen/Pres U.S. Grant) as well as Mt Cleveland, Mt Roosevelt and Mt Wilson. It was a very nice loop hike with a few nice viewpoints along the way.

            The origin of mountain/place names has always intrigued me, this year I purchased Place Names on Vermont's Long Trail from the Green Mtn Club, lots of interesting info.
            ADK 46/46 4W CATS 39/39 8W ADK100 63/102 VT35 26/29 FT's 25/29 VT FT's 9/15

            ScAtTeRbOnE's Adventures

            sigpic
            "We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh and bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun, a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal." John Muir from My First Summer in The Sierra

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            • #7
              ADK peaks that are named for people all seem to be people who were NY politicians or involved in Adirondack history.

              Things that are named for confederate generals are generally south of the Mason Dixon line. Conversely, I doubt there is much of anything named for Sherman in the south.
              ADKHP Wiki

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              • #8
                John Torrey, botanist and man of many other talents, was a member of the first group climbing Mount Marcy with Ebeneezer Emmons in 1839. The rare Torrey pine in California is named for him.

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                • #9
                  Cool thread. Brings back great memories.

                  Charlene, thanks for referencing "Gods & Generals." The book, which I still haven't read, was written by Jeff Shaara as a prequel to his father's 1974 historical novel on Gettysburg. In the mid-90s I did read Michael Shaara's "The Killer Angels," which won a Pulitzer, tearing through it in a day because it was so good. The son also wrote a sequel to his dad's book, making it a trilogy. I had planned on reading "Gods & Generals," but now that I know there's a movie, maybe I'll just watch that.

                  In Colorado, Sherman (14K) and Sheridan (13.9K) are twin peaks in the Mosquito Range, good starter hikes on mostly Class 1 terrain for people interested in climbing 14ers. I did a fun loop over them last summer. Incredible views.
                  You know I'm born to lose / And gambling's for fools / But that's the way I like it, baby / I don't wanna live forever "Ace of Spades" - Motorhead

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by SoloJoe View Post
                    I had planned on reading "Gods & Generals," but now that I know there's a movie, maybe I'll just watch that.
                    The movie is all right. It's nice seeing Jeff Daniels in the Chamberlain role again. But it doesn't hold a candle to Gettysburg.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by DSettahr View Post
                      The movie is all right. It's nice seeing Jeff Daniels in the Chamberlain role again. But it doesn't hold a candle to Gettysburg.
                      I remember sitting upstairs in Cantwell watching this for something. Back before all those shiny new labs and classrooms that are in there now. Maybe it was Org. Behavior. Dunno, can't remember, but it was a decent film.
                      Adopt a natural resource. Give back.

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                      • #12
                        Well now the real question is Rik, how many peaks are named after famous clowns?
                        ADK 46/46 4W CATS 39/39 8W ADK100 63/102 VT35 26/29 FT's 25/29 VT FT's 9/15

                        ScAtTeRbOnE's Adventures

                        sigpic
                        "We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh and bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun, a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal." John Muir from My First Summer in The Sierra

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                        • #13
                          Reenacting a battle. There's something I can't wrap my head around.

                          What is the purpose? To honour the dead by reenacting their demise? If so, then perhaps we should extend this courtesy to non-combatants and reenact grandpa's heart attack annually. If that sounds outrageous, well, that's how reenacted battles appear to me. Anyone care to make sense of this curious preoccupation with reliving the past?
                          Looking for Views!

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                          • #14
                            Very disturbing and wrong in so many ways...just what I expected from you Rik.
                            ADK 46/46 4W CATS 39/39 8W ADK100 63/102 VT35 26/29 FT's 25/29 VT FT's 9/15

                            ScAtTeRbOnE's Adventures

                            sigpic
                            "We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh and bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun, a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal." John Muir from My First Summer in The Sierra

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Trail Boss View Post
                              Reenacting a battle. There's something I can't wrap my head around.

                              What is the purpose? To honour the dead by reenacting their demise? If so, then perhaps we should extend this courtesy to non-combatants and reenact grandpa's heart attack annually. If that sounds outrageous, well, that's how reenacted battles appear to me. Anyone care to make sense of this curious preoccupation with reliving the past?

                              I assume most reenactments are made by the wronged party. I can't imagine the Germans reenacting the siege of Stalingrad (but I may be wrong).
                              Good question TrailBoss.

                              I was a reenactor from 15yrs old-early 20's. It stemmed for me out of an intense interest in history. Most of what we did as reenactors was educational programs (Living Histories/School Programs), meant as a hands-on learning experience for children as well as adults. The large scale reenactments are meant to show the battle logistics and experience on a larger scale, but the observers are still free to come to camp and see all aspects of military life at the time, ultimately an educational experience as well. There is no glory in war, but a respectful interpretation of those that served in that war can be a beneficial experience for observers. It's not just about "demise" there was an important social/political situation and also personal stories to the Civil War era, which can be taught to hopefully avoid another similar conflict (personal illnesses have similarities but are a broader more personal issue and can't be interpreted the same.) Most of the soldiers died of illness in camp anyhow and that is definitely something that is taught. The benefit of the hobby for reenactors is varied, some enjoy the camping, comraderie, educating others, honoring the memory of those that served etc. I personally learned a lot during my time reenacting and I enjoyed the experiences, even the hardships, just like hikers sometimes enjoy the challenges of a journey. Reenactments don't usually have anything to do with the "wronged" party, that term is subjective anyhow. There are reenactors of all sorts of historical periods, from Medieval to WWII, and people are willing to portray either side of the conflict. I was in a unit portraying a Union company but I didn't hesitate to don the Confederate Gray on a few occasions. I hope this explains the motivation/reasoning behind reenacting a little. Someday I'll put my uniform back on, set up my pup tent, and fall in to line again.

                              Some general info from Wikipedia on Historical Reenactments
                              Last edited by ScAtTeRbOnE; 11-28-2012, 11:28 AM.
                              ADK 46/46 4W CATS 39/39 8W ADK100 63/102 VT35 26/29 FT's 25/29 VT FT's 9/15

                              ScAtTeRbOnE's Adventures

                              sigpic
                              "We are now in the mountains and they are in us, kindling enthusiasm, making every nerve quiver, filling every pore and cell of us. Our flesh and bone tabernacle seems transparent as glass to the beauty about us, as if truly an inseparable part of it, thrilling with the air and trees, streams and rocks, in the waves of the sun, a part of all nature, neither old nor young, sick nor well, but immortal." John Muir from My First Summer in The Sierra

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