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  • #16
    twin brook trail corridor access update

    I don't have a definitive answer yet, but the source I checked with (who is usually up-to-date on these matters) says he's not absolutely sure but doesn't believe the DEC would relinquish the access. Guess I'll go ask someone at DEC.
    Scooting here and there
    Through the woods and up the peaks
    Random Scoots awaits (DP)


    Eat, sleep, hike, repeat.

    It doesn't have to be viewtiful to be beautiful. (NL)

    "Pushing the limits of easy."

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    • #17
      Originally posted by pete_hickey
      The yellow trail can bee seen on the '53 map, here:
      http://docs.unh.edu/NY/mrcy53sw.jpg
      Very cool map. Thanks for posting it.

      The Panther Gorge Trail was wiped out in 1950, right? Had they not updated the map in 1953? Or just not realized/decided that the trail was irrecoverable?

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      • #18
        Originally posted by TEO
        Very cool map. Thanks for posting it.?
        Oh, then you are not aware of UNH,s archive of the old maps. Note that the trail didn't exist in 1895.... Heck, not that Marcy Dam didn't exist then.

        http://docs.unh.edu/NY/mrcy95sw.jpg

        (That map is also on the wall in the room with the fireplace, at the Loj) If you go here:

        http://docs.unh.edu/nhtopos/nhtopos.htm

        you can find tons of old maps. I like looking at the 19th century maps of Long Island..
        Guinness: Goes in brown, comes out yellow.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by pete_hickey
          Oh, then you are not aware of UNH,s archive of the old maps. Note that the trail didn't exist in 1895.... Heck, not that Marcy Dam didn't exist then.
          Sometimes I forget that it is there. No longer, it is now bookmarked. Previously, I'd only looked at the Vermont and New Hampshire maps. What a fantastic resource though--to easily be able to see the maps that the Marshall Brothers and Herbert Clark based the list on, to see all the lost trails, to see how maps have changed, etc.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by TEO
            ... to see how maps have changed, etc.
            What I find amazing, is to see how LITTLE they have changed. We think our technology is so great these days, yet those old maps are probably 98% accurate.
            Guinness: Goes in brown, comes out yellow.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by pete_hickey
              What I find amazing, is to see how LITTLE they have changed. We think our technology is so great these days, yet those old maps are probably 98% accurate.
              I agree. But for example, look at the contour shapes in the Santanoni Range in 1904: http://docs.unh.edu/NY/sant04sw.jpg
              and again in 1953:
              http://docs.unh.edu/NY/sant53sw.jpg

              And then there are the obvious changes such as colour, legend symbols, etc.

              For me the fascination is being able to see the changes, whatever they are and included in that is the degree to which they have changed whether it be great or small.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by pete_hickey
                What I find amazing, is to see how LITTLE they have changed. We think our technology is so great these days, yet those old maps are probably 98% accurate.

                Elevations obviously change though. Just looking at the Santanoni Range (since the last post directed our attention to it). NO Wonder they thought Couchsachraga was 4000', because based on countour lines, that is exactly how high it say's it is. The 1953 map has the elevation at 3820' and the 1978 Metric map lists it a 1156 M (3792'). Just how high it Couchie anyway? :roll:

                Another example is Little Santanoni Mt. The early map show the highest contour line at 3340'. The 1953 has it at 3500' and the 1978 metric map has it at 1068 M (3504'), most likely cause they didn't look real hard :roll:
                "The forest is the poor man's overcoat. " Old Northeastern Proverb

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                • #23
                  A couple of things of interest I noticed on the '53 map; In the JBL area, there is a mountain named 'witchopple', which must of been changed at some point to 'Howard'. It even had a trail that dead-ended on its' flank. Just to the south of that, there was a loop trail that went up to a ridge on the eastern end of Table Top. It looks like it followed along the banks of Hogback Brook, and then returned to the Phelps Trail near the intersection of the Hopkins Trail.

                  Notice also that the trail up to Algonquin followed in MacIntyre Brook for the lower reaches. No to mention a dead-ender that went off the Whale's Tail Trail up the north side of Wright. Legitamate trails or cartographic errors?
                  https://picasaweb.google.com/masshysteria1958

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