Adirondack 100 Highest

Many Adirondack hiking enthusiasts and peakbaggers choose to concentrate their time climbing the 46 high peaks. In summer, in winter, or spring and fall. Some even go on to hike there 46 in each calendar month or even 46times over. A select few choose to broaden the scope somewhat begin to hike some or all of the one hundred highest summits within the park. This seems easy enough, except when you begin to locate some of them on a map. Out of the remaining 54 peaks, least 36 have no trail that lead to the summit, and if you've ever walked through dense spruce thickets, you can appreciate how difficult that would be up steep slopes for miles on end (in some cases). Four more are fully on private property and need permission to be climbed, and another 5-6 require significant planning in order not to encroach on private property.

Some may wonder why this information need be posted at all. The only answer I can give is that (most of) these peaks belong to ALL of us and it is only through proper disclosure and knowledge that one can come to fully appreciate what the Adirondack Mountains have to offer. The Adirondacks are so much more than the 46 highest peaks. We encourage respectful exploration of some of these places for those interested. Welcome to the next level.

The beauty of these peaks lie in the experiences you discover while climbing them. Each person will not share the same experience as the next. Climbing these mountains is an individual journey of discover, both in your experience, and in the way each peak will leave it's mark upon you. You may find camaraderie and shared experiences along the way, but the meaning and significance of these places below to you alone. It's part of the magic of these summits.

You will find no specific route information here. That's up to you to discover on your own and will become and essental part of your journey. You will hopefully find instead, a greater context and appreciation for these mountains, perhaps even a few shared stories and individual experiences.

 



Rank
Mountain
Elevation
Trail Type
47
McNaughton
4000'
Bushwhack
48
Green
3980'
Bushwhack
49
Unnamed Peak (Lost Pond)
3900'
Bushwhack
50t
Snowy
3899'
Firetower
50t
Moose
3899'
Trail
52
Kilborn
3894'
Bushwhack
53
Raker Pk. (Sawtooth #1)
3877'
Bushwhack
54
Panther Mt. (Indian Lake)
3865'
Bushwhack
55
McKenzie
3861'
Trail
56t
Blue Ridge (E. Cedar Lakes)
3860'
Bushwhack
56t
North River Mt.
3860'
Bushwhack
58
Sentinel
3838'
Bushwhack
59
Lyon Mt.
3830'
Firetower
60t
Cutter (Sawtooth #2)
3820'
Bushwhack
60t
Unnamed Peak (T.R. Mt.)
3820'
Bushwhack
62
Averill
3810'
Bushwhack
63
Avalanche
3800'
Bushwhack
64
Buell
3786'
Bushwhack
65
Boreas
3776'
Private Property
66t
Blue
3760'
Firetower
66t
Wakely
3760'
Firetower
68
Henderson
3752'
Bushwhack
69
Lewey
3750'
Bushwhack
70t
Sawtooth #3
3700'
Bushwhack
70t
Wallface
3700'
Bushwhack
72
Hurricane
3694'
Firetower
73
Hoffman
3693'
Bushwhack
74
Cheney Cobble
3683'
Bushwhack
75t
Calamity
3620'
Bushwhack
75t
Little Moose
3620'
Bushwhack
77
Sunrise Mt.
3614'
Bushwhack
78
Stewart (Sentinals)
3602'
Bushwhack
79t
Jay
3600'
Trail
79t
Pitchoff (Sentinals)
3600'
Trail
79t
Saddleback (Jay Range)
3600'
Bushwhack
82
Pillsbury
3557'
Firetower
83
Slide Mt (Sentinals)
3584'
Bushwhack
84
Gore Mt.
3583'
Trail
85
Dun Brook Mt.
3580'
Private Property
86
Noonmark
3556'
Trail
87t
Mt. Adams
3540'
Firetower
87t
Fishing Brook Mt.
3540'
Private Property
89
Little Santanoni Mt.
2500
Bushwhack
90
Blue Ridge (NE of Dishrag)
3497'
Bushwhack
91
Unnamed Pk. (Fishing Brook)
3480'
Private Property
92
Puffer Mountain
3472'
Bushwhack
93t
Sawteeth #4
3460'
Bushwhack
93t
Sawteeth #5
3460'
Bushwhack
93t
Wolf Pond Peak
3460'
Private Property
96
Cellar Mt. (Cedar Mt. Flow)
3450
Bushwhack
97t
Blue Ridge (N. of Hoffman)
3440
Bushwhack
97t
Morgan
3440'
Bushwhack
99
Blue Ridge (NW of Dishrag)
3426'
Bushwhack
100
Unnamed (Brown Pond Mt)
3425''
Bushwhack


Table legend: Bushwhack - No trail or heardpath leads to the summit. Trailed - A maintained or unmaintained trail or path to the summit. Firetower - Means that there is a firetower at the summit and generally that means there is a maintained trail to the summit. Private Property - The summit is on private property or significant privacy land issue exist and permission is needed to climb or approach. Careful research required.