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Old 04-09-2012, 06:15 PM   #1
mudrat
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Moose Mountain Bushwhack via NW and N Slides

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Gregory Karl Pics
MudRat Pics

4/7/2012
I’ve been trying to get to the Moose Mountain slides for years and with a dry spring, figured that conditions didn’t get much better for the bushwhack from pond to slide bottom. Thankfully Gregory Karl accepted my invitation to go explore.

Northern Slide Tribs from Franklin Falls Pond. This was NOT the pond from which we bushwhacked and is almost 5 miles from where I took the pic to the slide base. Moose Pond approach is shorter.

We began at 8:15 a.m. from Moose Pond boat launch and followed a beaten shoreline path over to the first stream. The 10 foot wide stream was easy to cross on a mossy log, though Greg opted for a beaver dam a bit higher. After discussing the remaining route details, we decided to head toward the slide and aim for an innocuous bump just to the right of the northwest slide’s drainage in hopes it would give us a close view of the slide.

The terrain was pleasant through an open hardwood forest dotted with occasional groups of hemlock. The bare trees allowed for easy line of sight navigation though Gregory kept us on a fine track via his compass. The second stream, an obvious outlet from Grass Pond to our nne was also riddled with beaver activity. We crossed at an old blown-out dam. A quick leap cleared the narrow stream. A wet spring, however, would likely make for a wet crossing of the area. Several other lowlands riddled the area, though we avoided them on our heading. Congenial conversation, pleasurable terrain and patchy light snow-cover found us near the bump about two hours later. I think we missed the prominence, but encountered the nw slide drainage.

Along the banks of the drainage, we were able to spy the mid to upper slide segments. Four foot high debris piles along the edges were host to small trees and the deep (15 foot) drainage was dominated by rubble at 2,500’. It was also covered in about two inches of snow. I groaned at the white carpet in the drainage and underfoot. Neither of us brought microspikes and crampons, attached to our packs, would have been overkill at this point. We stayed in the adjacent woods and slipped our way upward toward the lower slabs. Eventually, we resorted to rock/ice hopping in the drainage, a delicate endeavor that plunged Greg through a thin sheet of ice at one point. Gortex kept him dry.

Northwestern Slide
10:30 a.m. found us at the first snow and ice covered portion of slab where we donned crampons and took the axes off our packs. They weren’t so much for climbing as self-arrest if needed. A hundred foot higher the snow remained on the right-hand portion, while the left boasted open slab with scattered verglas. I changed to rock climbing shoes while Gregory changed into approach shoes at about 3000 feet in elevation. It felt odd wearing climbing shoes while carrying an ice ax…the ax was overkill, in hindsight.


The slide contained more slab than I expected. The dominant portions of slab were near the bottom, some red from algae, some wet from runoff. Rubble and ledges replaced open slab. Spruce poked through the snow, mainly on the right-hand side. The view behind showed our approach from the pond wonderfully, the various ups and downs reduced to a seemingly flat landscape. Moose and Grass Ponds looked inviting from a distance. Small lenticular clouds built in the sky far beyond as a cold breeze blew from the northwest. It was a small gem of a slide worth the 2.5 hour walk in a beautiful forest.

Midway up the slide, small ledges became the rule. Clean rock outweighed any small patches of ice or snow on the surface, though we did have to backtrack to cross the ice at one point. Nearer the top at about 3,300’, we approached a larger ledge. Fat ice flows dominated the southwestern side and a portion of the center. The fifteen foot high feature begged to be climbed and I tried to oblige. Somewhere between me fumbling around avoiding the intermitted ice, Gregory circumvented and climbed some smaller, more convenient ledges. Realizing it was probably possible, but possibly hazardous, I followed. The upper 100’ was primarily rubble that tapered to a narrow point in the spruce forest. It was noon when we ate a snack and watched the clouds overtake the formerly blue sky.

Northern Slide
Our next task was to trek to the lowest elevation of open rock on the thinner northern slide. We discussed our options and I caved into Gregory’s idea to enter the spruce from the top of the northwestern slide and bushwhack down 600’ over 1/3 of a mile to the northeast. It was a good choice. By our standards it was a comfortable traverse with the tightest growth at shoulder width or flexible enough to push aside. The inherent challenge was descending some rather steep sections without traction…soon to become a theme.

Eventually the conifers gave way to hardwoods and small drainages began to appear underfoot. Carelessly, I stepped onto the ice and plunged into the icy runoff almost to my knee. I wasn’t wearing gaiter or gortex, so the water saturated both boot and socks. The cold sloshing water eventually warmed, however slightly. A few minutes later we found the drainage and followed it up to the open rock above a messy pile of old destruction. The trees were gray from years of decomposition, but still supportive if not a bit brittle. My thoughts, however, wandered first to food and then to wringing the water from my sock. The snow was gradually increasing in depth and my toes were numb.

It was 1:00 p.m. when we arrived and changed back into crampons, joking about the umpteenth change in footwear. The first portion was the widest and closed in within about 100 feet. Ice flows hid most of the impressive stone of the footwall, but enough anorthosite showed to reveal its nature…a few larger ledges and intermediate steps that led to a gentler area of more open slab.

About 560 ground feet up, the slide split. We followed the eastern tributary for a short portion. Small ledges and mainly rubble dominated to a turn in direction. Our goal was the western leg, however, and we traversed through the short span of woods to find ourselves on a steep span of ice/snow-covered slab which quickly transitioned to rubble. It was a thin slide, hardly worthy of note until the headwall.


The right tributary got wider at about 3,350 in elevation and unveiled a view of the steep and tempting headwall. It too begged to be climbed. It was about 45 degrees with some small ledges for footholds, but we stayed to the edges rather than change to climbing shoes once again. My feet were again numb even while walking and a chill wind was more persistent. The clouds were closing in. Playing around with another footwear change seemed unwise since it would also mean some rather delicate climbing to avoid several areas of verglas and snow.

From slide top to summit took another fifteen more minutes. At the top of a chute to the left of a ledge, I found spot needing slightly more concentration and effort to get up a small vertical ledge. I believe I described the area as, “Looking good.” My opinion differed from Gregory’s. As I committed myself to the effort and fought to maintain my upward momentum in combination with balance, Gregory quipped a hysterical jab regarding my route. I lost the battle with gravity and traction as I laughed and slid/fell back down. A few more minutes of bushwhacking led us to the trail just below the summit at 2:00 p.m…a thoroughly successful day, but one that was far from over.

Exit
Given that the entire day was one long bushwhack except for a few hundred yards on the trail from Moose’s summit toward McKenzie, I figured a return route might be to head northwest from the trail at a low point…toward Moose Pond. The theory was sound, at least.

We broke away from the trail and descended northwest toward the pond…adjacent to, but one ridge over from the northwestern slide. It became a tiring ordeal. The trees were relatively tight, but flexible once again. Our footing was the main irritant. Without traction, the few inches of wet snow compacted and sent us sliding with every footstep if we weren’t braced. About 700’ below the summit, several Monty Python quotes and an hour later, the forest opened as blowdown increased near the drainage…normal. We side-sloped first on the left and then the right trying to stay above the drainage by about 50 vertical feet. Snow continued to play with our footing.

Eventually, the snow disappeared as we dropped below 2500’ so. Hardwoods replaced the tight spruce as I sighed in relief. Gregory began talking about the stream heading a bit more westerly as we descended past the 2000’ mark. I listened and between talking and just enjoying the exploration, inadvertently ignored him and continued to followed the stream. I knew we were still basically heading toward Moose Pond, so I wasn’t particularly concerned. Besides, he didn’t hit me over the head with a rock, so I knew figured it couldn’t be that bad…


We followed the drainage through a series of small hillocks and lowlands for about 1.5 miles before coming to a small acid pond, a graveyard of trees. It was about 700’ across at its widest surrounded by sphagnum as normal. Neither of us knew precisely where it was in relation to our actual objective. As I pondered the area, the distant call of a great horned owl seemed to laugh at our arrival. The hoots, if roughly translated, probably meant, “Wrong pond you idiot.”

I pulled out a satellite image and was confident of our location after looking at the pic…1/2 mile due south of our true target. I also figured if I was wrong, Greg was tired enough from the extra mile and one half that I could outrun him should he come after me with a stick. The owl was still hooting as we climbed the first hill away from the pond-I ignored the possible translation.

After another twenty minutes and some three hills of extra elevation gain…on a strictly enforced northerly heading, we found Moose Pond. It was 6:10. I recognized the southeastern shoreline from a kayak trip last year when my wife, parents and I went ashore only to find a mating ball of garter snakes, but that’s a different story.

Greg and I followed a herd path through the brown tufts of grass along the end of the Grass Pond outlet. Upon finding the actual stream, I crossed on a sturdy log, turned around and watched Greg breach a rickety beaver dam with one leg. After draining his gortex shoe…great for keeping water in as well as out…we found the herdpath and got back to the car at 6:50 p.m. The route in full was about 9.5 miles over 3,500 feet of vertical gain. Twas a great day in the woods full of many hidden jewels. Thanks for the company Greg!!!!
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Old 04-09-2012, 07:09 PM   #2
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Yeah, pretty cool rockshoes with ice axes..., you got to take what you need to do the job.

I have to admit, you must have a much better knowledge of the ADKs than myself.
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Old 04-09-2012, 08:57 PM   #3
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The two Titans of slide climbing combining their talents; you sure you guys weren't on Olympus? Nice hike!!
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Old 04-09-2012, 10:01 PM   #4
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The two Titans of slide climbing combining their talents; you sure you guys weren't on Olympus? Nice hike!!
I strenuously object to being called a Titan. My apparent obsession with slides is coincidental; my main objectives are new routes, new territory, and new destinations, so, post-Irene, slides are just the low-hanging fruit. Kevin's obsession with slides, on the other hand, is real.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:00 PM   #5
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Kevin,
First of all, great report. I almost felt like I was there!

One thing I learned from our adventure (well, that just proves I'm a slow learner, I guess!) is that navigating in a group setting is a different animal than navigating solo. The difference is that the former requires very specific kinds of communication, whereas, most of the time, during the latter, I tend to know my own mind. It is sure proof of negligence on my part, however, that I don't know, even now, whether you were following magnetic headings or true ones on Saturday's hike! I made my usual declaration—which doubles as lame humor—in the swamp near the beginning, when I said: "All of my headings are true," but I failed to ask about yours. What difference does 14° make? In our case it might have been the difference between following one brook and another.

Anyway, after a while, on the return, we both knew we were heading toward the W end of the pond, so it wasn't like we were lost or anything. And in retrospect, I'm glad we went that way. I got to see more new terrain and to stay out longer in fine company. May all of our errors prove so felicitous!
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:05 AM   #6
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Kevin,
First of all, great report. I almost felt like I was there!

One thing I learned from our adventure (well, that just proves I'm a slow learner, I guess!) is that navigating in a group setting is a different animal than navigating solo. The difference is that the former requires very specific kinds of communication, whereas, most of the time, during the latter, I tend to know my own mind. It is sure proof of negligence on my part, however, that I don't know, even now, whether you were following magnetic headings or true ones on Saturday's hike! I made my usual declaration—which doubles as lame humor—in the swamp near the beginning, when I said: "All of my headings are true," but I failed to ask about yours. What difference does 14° make? In our case it might have been the difference between following one brook and another.

Anyway, after a while, on the return, we both knew we were heading toward the W end of the pond, so it wasn't like we were lost or anything. And in retrospect, I'm glad we went that way. I got to see more new terrain and to stay out longer in fine company. May all of our errors prove so felicitous!
Thanks, i had fun with our collective humor during the day and writing the report.

Yes, navigation is different; I tend to navigate by a combination of feel/magnetic/sun. I did hear you say TRUE in the beginning, but failed to listen...an error on my part...(not enough coffee). When I'm solo, I try to lock it down a bit more precisely unless I just feel like wandering. I'm definitely glad we strayed as I was quite curious about the well-trodden herd path we found, how the stream along are descent entered the pond and the area in general. Like you said, we knew we were heading toward Moose Pond, however broadly.

Hey, some of the best bushwhacks are the result of one or more errors. As long as safety is always taken into consideration, no harm done
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:07 AM   #7
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The two Titans of slide climbing combining their talents; you sure you guys weren't on Olympus? Nice hike!!
Thanks!
In this one, the slides were the excuse to go explore the area. I looked forward to the bushwhack and slides equally. I think the mountain's a bit to covered in spruce to be Olympus, though!
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Old 04-10-2012, 07:10 AM   #8
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Yeah, pretty cool rockshoes with ice axes..., you got to take what you need to do the job.

I have to admit, you must have a much better knowledge of the ADKs than myself.
Not sure how cool I actually looked using that combination!
I think I'll be learning the 'daks for the rest of my life, a good excuse to keep going out.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:31 AM   #9
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Another great trip and TR. Maybe I'll get up there in April/May to finally climb a slide again. I hear there are a few more since Irene.
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:05 AM   #10
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I guess I'll be revealing something about myself when I say that, although I was fascinated by the entire trip, what really piqued my interest is when you heard the great horned owl.

Great TR and a very interesting look at the skills and equipment needed to negotiate the varied terrain. I've had the good fortune to visit the summit of Moose but not via the challenging route you chose. I'm interested in exploring these rugged routes. I hope I get the opportunity to join one of your future slide climbing trips but to an easier destination (for newbies like myself).
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Old 04-10-2012, 09:41 AM   #11
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MudRat said, "I pulled out a satellite image and was confident of our location after looking at the pic…1/2 mile due south of or true target. I also figured if I was wrong, Greg was tired enough from the extra mile and one half that I could outrun him should he come after me with a stick. The owl was still hooting as we climbed the first hill away from the pond-I ignored the possible translation.

After another twenty minutes and some three hills of extra elevation gain…on a strictly enforced northerly heading, we found Moose Pond. It was 6:10. I recognized the southeastern shoreline from a kayak trip last year when my wife, parents and I went ashore only to find a mating ball of garter snakes, but that’s a different story."

Now why does that remind me of another tortuous exit from a different mountain last (ahem) July? You know - the one where I kissed the trail when we finally got to it?
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:38 AM   #12
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I guess I'll be revealing something about myself when I say that, although I was fascinated by the entire trip, what really piqued my interest is when you heard the great horned owl.

Great TR and a very interesting look at the skills and equipment needed to negotiate the varied terrain. I've had the good fortune to visit the summit of Moose but not via the challenging route you chose. I'm interested in exploring these rugged routes. I hope I get the opportunity to join one of your future slide climbing trips but to an easier destination (for newbies like myself).
I once encountered a Great Horned climbing Lost Pond Peak. I had stopped for a breather and saw a subtle motion ahead and above. The owl had alighted on a bough about 25 feet away without noticing me. It was about two feet tall. When I turned my eyes up toward it, that minimal motion caught its attention, its head snapped down, and, a second later, the bough dipped, the owl rising in total silence, wheeling off through the close canopy over my head and to the right.

I'd be glad to climb a slide with you sometime. It'll give me an excuse to do an old favorite.
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Old 04-10-2012, 11:56 AM   #13
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Trail Boss: It would be a pleasure to have you along sometime. I've got some heaftier goals line up for the near future, but will let you know when do some that are a bit less 'painful' to start with You know, I really enjoyed the owl as well. I work with a rehabber down the street sometimes and always enjoy the owls. I've several barred owls that stay close to my house, but no great horned...i guess if I did, the barred variety would disappear pretty quickly.

NoTrace: This wasn't so much a tortuous as enjoyable exit. Lack of spikes was the only torture. Of course, our adventure (when I took your avatar picture) involved you testing gravity and cat-napping from dog-sitting on Twin Slide too. We followed a near-straight heading out of there that was a bit longer than we'd planned. I was pooped too, though I didn't kiss the trail...didn't want to get any of your germs
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:19 PM   #14
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Hey, some of the best bushwhacks are the result of one or more errors. As long as safety is always taken into consideration, no harm done
Hmmmm could be a new signature line.
Great TR and pics, nothing like hypothesis hiking I always say
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Old 04-10-2012, 12:52 PM   #15
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Hmmmm could be a new signature line.
Great TR and pics, nothing like hypothesis hiking I always say
Thanks, Jack.

I've got a better summary of that idea somewhere, but it's so true many times. I've goofed in various areas and the overall day ended up more interesting in the long run. Correcting on the fly helps you to learn the area better as well at times. Heck, it's all fun!

This little trek prompted a bunch of question from MacAttack (my father) as well. I see infinite slide possibilities; he sees infinite fishing possibilities. There's lots of pools in almost all the streams we crossed that could bode well for fish.
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:01 PM   #16
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... I've goofed in various areas ....
....Goofy?
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Old 04-10-2012, 01:04 PM   #17
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....Goofy?
I was searching my dictionary of technical terms and that jumped to the front of the line
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Old 04-17-2012, 08:59 AM   #18
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I've got some heaftier goals line up for the near future,
That reminds me Kevin, I've been meaning to PM you with some photos from a recent trip up Pinnacle. Some interesting recon....
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Old 04-17-2012, 09:02 AM   #19
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That reminds me Kevin, I've been meaning to PM you with some photos from a recent trip up Pinnacle. Some interesting recon....
Excellent, I'll look forward to that!
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Old 04-18-2012, 03:07 PM   #20
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The Titans of Rocks

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I strenuously object to being called a Titan. My apparent obsession with slides is coincidental;
It is wonderful to have an obsession with coincidental slides. I do not find the reference that bad.

It could be worse, something like: "The Midgets of Gibraltar"

How about that title?
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