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30'' snowshoe recommendation?

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  • 30'' snowshoe recommendation?

    I briefly looked at Atlas and MSR 30'' snowshoes in MEC today. The Atlas Treeline looked better than the MSR's to me. I'm looking at 30 inchers for bushwhacking. Does anybody have any other recommendations? Northern Lites are way lighter and cost 320 USD.
    Project-100: 100 peaks, one winter. https://project100singlewinter.wordpress.com/

  • #2
    There is the Tubbs Mountaineer. I'm not familiar with the new binding though. 30 inch is a medium snowshoe, so expect medium floatation. Do you have a pair of 36 inch Tubbs'? Seems like I've seen pictures of you with large ones.

    Another thing to think about is the balance. I like a good amount of surface in the front of the snowshoe, ahead of the hole. Tubbs always made their old Sierra 30 inch with too little in front, and their Mountaineer may have the same problem. But that's the difficulty in finding anything good nowadays. The manufacturers think that we don't want balanced snowshoes. Of course if you like to kick steps, then maybe you don't want a balanced snowshoe.
    I might be kidding...

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    • #3
      GV has these: http://www.gvsnowshoes.com/en/snowsh...ntain-trail/24 One size is 9x29

      And these: http://www.gvsnowshoes.com/en/snowsh...ow-aerolite/10

      And these: http://www.gvsnowshoes.com/en/snowsh.../wide-trail/22

      And these: http://www.gvsnowshoes.com/en/snowsh.../snow-trail/21
      I might be kidding...

      Comment


      • Nivek
        Nivek commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks for response.

        I'm not addicted to the televators (meaning the heel lift thing, right?) I rarely use it....

        The Tubbs Yukons are an old model they don't produce anymore, correct? 10x36? Bindings good? Do you like the Yukons?
        I think I can obtain them used, for a reasonable price. I may pull the trigger. Thoughts?

      • CatskillKev
        CatskillKev commented
        Editing a comment
        After getting the 12x42, I don't use the Yukon's much, but when the Yukon's were my biggest, they were my favorite snowshoe. Yes, not produced that I know of--in fact they've quit on the TD91. The TD91 binding is a good binding. Typically you put the front buckle on the outside of your foot, but if you're having centering problems, you can switch the natural right/left--put the right shoe on the left foot. Its a good binding though that doesn't give too much trouble. Holds your foot fore and aft very well. Sometimes you fight a little side to side, but usually its not too bad. The control wings are great, but they could be tighter together for more control. I think you should go for it!

      • Nivek
        Nivek commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks for your help again. Waiting on some information. I'll let you know what happens....

    • #4
      Originally posted by Neil
      I briefly looked at Atlas and MSR 30'' snowshoes in MEC today. The Atlas Treeline looked better than the MSR's to me. I'm looking at 30 inchers for bushwhacking. Does anybody have any other recommendations? Northern Lites are way lighter and cost 320 USD.
      I still like the old Sherpa snowshoes. You can pick them up cheap on eBay but make sure the bindings have the toe strap. They sold them with small or large claws so you need to look at that too.

      I had a pair of atlas 10 series and they worked well. The binding was stiff and did not make it easy to nest them together on your pack. In the end I sold them to my nephew as I had too many pairs.

      I know some folks that own northern lites and bring them on the hikes where they anticipate carrying the shoes all day due to low snow cover. Light shoes are great for that and robustness doesn’t matter.



      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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      • #5
        I use Tubbs Mountaineer 30". Has serious fangs on bottom. Used to have Atlas but dislike that the bindings are so close to front of snowshoe.....
        Catskills: 39/39, 26W/35W
        ADK: 46/46

        Comment


        • #6
          I use Havlick 30" shoes when there's a good chance that my route won't be well packed. They're a basic oval shape with aggressive aluminum claws, 3-strap binding, no televator, and an anti-drag tail. They're 100% made within the Adirondack blue line. Last I knew, they're generally not available in stores. https://www.hscind.com/index.php/pro...ory/snowshoes/
          They tell you that the 30" shoe weighs 1lb 7 ozs, or 2 lbs 1 oz with binding. I guess if you're into ultralight snowshoeing, you go without the bindings. For super ultralight, go with one shoe, no binding. ;-)
          Last edited by MarkL; 01-24-2018, 06:25 PM. Reason: To correct the weight w/binding.
          Mark
          A bad day in cripplebrush is better than a good day at work.

          Remaining Winter NE115 peaks as of 3/11/10:

          [None]
          Yes!!!

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          • #7
            I just bought a new pair of snow shoes and hiked with them last weekend. My old pair broke. They are Atlas shoes. I have to say I was totally happy with them in all aspects, especially the strap design.

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            • #8
              Northern Lites has a new model this year with much more aggressive crampons. They look like a pretty good alternative. I've used the older style for many years and the extra traction could be useful. Also, none of us (my brother and I) have ever had a failure with the NL snowshoes in many, many miles.
              Nobody moves.... nobody gets hurt!

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              • CatskillKev
                CatskillKev commented
                Editing a comment
                They're lite. Oh they're lite. No axle, which I don't like. But I do like that they spell floatation floatation.

            • #9
              I've used a pair of 30-inchers on a whack of Avalanche and have done several whack with my MSR's while one of my partners used 30 inchers. The 30's are more trouble than they're worth on the whacks. Extra floatation but a PITA at the same time, getting snagged and caught up. Going up Calamity, I barely sunk in at all with my MSR's. Descending Cheney in unconsolidated snow I don't think I would have wanted the 30 inchers due to the vegetation underneath.
              Project-100: 100 peaks, one winter. https://project100singlewinter.wordpress.com/

              Comment


              • CatskillKev
                CatskillKev commented
                Editing a comment
                There may be some special frosting of the snow in the Adirondacks that gives better floatation, than in the Catskills. That said, I can use 30's as well as most use 25's, since 30's are quite small to me. Its partly about what you're used to. Training. In any event, yes, there is an inclination to go down in a size due to vegetation and steepness.

                I think my perfect steep bushwhacking snowshoe for the Adirondacks is 9x30 Tubbs with big crampons, but yours may in fact be 25.
                Last edited by CatskillKev; 01-25-2018, 10:26 AM.

              • Neil
                Neil commented
                Editing a comment
                I'm used to big shoes. I use 36'' shoes for bushwhacks in Quebec. The Tubbs I used on Avalanche had the viper crampon and were a full 30''.

            • #10
              Cool! I did not know that (about your 36 inch experience). Were you using the Pinnacle snowshoe on Avalanche?
              I might be kidding...

              Comment


              • Neil
                Neil commented
                Editing a comment
                The Tubbs were 12 years old. Not sure of the model. They were loaned to me.
                The 36''-ers are perfect for Quebec hardwood forests. They have small crampons so they are limited too gentle hills.

              • CatskillKev
                CatskillKev commented
                Editing a comment
                Were they (the Tubbs) red with a Bear Hug binding? This black binding fits all around the foot with just a simple red lever at the top of the foot to tighten it all up. If so, great snowshoes but the binding kills on descents when your foot tries to slide forward because there is no toe stop.

                Or at only 12 years old, maybe the Mountaineer???
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