Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Boot advice

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Boot advice

    Remember in the old days? Those beautiful vibram soles with those sturdy lugs. They do really great in the ADK mud because they don't get clogged up. The mud stays between the lugs and the knobs give traction on the roots and rocks. They protect the feet nicely too.

    I have a pair of leather hiking boots that have a those lovely lugs but alas they are falling to pieces. I tried using my inexpensive going to the office on snow days columbia hiking sneakery boots and while I moved much faster because of the weight, I slid all over and almost got my planter factitious back again.

    So I am looking for replacement boots. I would like to find lighter boots that are so often found today with deep strong lugs like the old days.

    I found the oboz mid bridger in a lovely store in Glenns falls called the Fountain Square Outfitters.

    http://www.fountainsquareoutfitters.com/

    https://obozfootwear.com/products/me...dry-waterproof

    Now I would return and buy a pair of these but I read a few reviews in the REI website that the lugs fall off! Alot of these reviews of the shoes were really really rave so maybe I should give them a try.

    Merrel sells a leather boot with the old time vibram soles for 400 bucks! Ouch!

    I saw these in the mountineer in saratoga and they look like my best bet.

    Garmont PORDOI NUBUCK GTX

    http://www.garmont.com/en/products/h...doi-nubuck-gtx

    Any thoughts would be appreciated!
    Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
    ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

  • #2
    Originally posted by Bunchberry View Post
    ... Those beautiful vibram soles with those sturdy lugs. They do really great in the ADK mud because they don't get clogged up. The mud stays between the lugs and the knobs give traction on the roots and rocks....
    So, it's not a bug, it's a feature?

    I still own a pair of ten-ton leather boots with a Norwegian welt and classic Vibram lugged soles. Nothing will get me hiking in them again unless I lose a bet!

    Three decades ago, I backpacked the High Peaks shod in heavy-duty leather boots with classic Vibram soles. Fast forward to the 21st century and now I wear either lightweight ankle-height boots or trail-runners with shallow lugged soles that shed mud very well. Traction is far better than the old deep-lugged soles. In other words, don't limit your choices to classic Vibram soles because some of the modern designs and materials work better.

    BTW, should you wish to purchase a pair of very lightly-used, Asolo Yukon boots, make me an offer. They're old enough to be in the "Classic Car" category. They weigh 2 pounds 12 ounces ... each. Size is either 10.5 or 11, I can no longer remember. Even if you don't wear them, they look great next to a pair of old wood skis nailed to the wall; they make nice conversations pieces. Serious offers only, please.

    Looking for Views!

    Comment


    • #3
      I've been using the oboz bridger low for a few seasons and they might be my favorite ADK hiking shoes ever. For me they are just the right balance between light/flexible and substantial under-the-foot for mixed terrain of mud, rocks, and roots. The outersole is pretty aggressive by today's standard for hiking shoes (at least it seems that way) and the lugs are a bit softer, so they do wear faster than the old vibram soles, but they have really good grip on dry rock. I would suggest you give them a try.

      Comment


      • #4
        Of course there are a lot of footwear threads, but I will add the advice that always appears: the most important thing is fit. Everyone's feet are different, and all the manufacturers use different lasts and some different processes, so fit is key.

        I have a narrow foot, and do well generally with Salomon, Scarpa and La Sportiva. I have tried Oboz, Merrel, Keen, Garmont, etc. and I generally cannot wear any of their shoes - they all feel boxy and sloppy like I'm wearing the shoe boxes, rather than the shoes.

        So try on lots of stuff before you decide. And I agree with the advice above - the modern, lighter, more flexible footwear is a joy, as long as it fits right and uses good sole materials. (Sounds like the Columbias are just a junky shoe that does not do what you need, but that's not a reason to abandon the lighter gear.) Even the "good" brands have occasional "bad sole material" lapses. Sportiva made a version of the Wildcat where the sole lugs all fell of the first time out; they also made a version of one of their trail runners where the rubber was really slippery and had no traction. But the ones I currently have work great. So it's quite a challenge to find what will work for you.

        (My current hiking footwear - Summer: La Sportiva Primer Low - Winter: Salomon Toundra)

        Comment


        • #5
          I like my LL Bean Crestas. Leather, Gore-Tex, but a mid weight, not too heavy.

          Comment


          • #6
            Over the years I have been consistently downgrading my footwear. I started with heavy, all-leather backpacking boots, then went down to a light hiker, then a mid-height approach shoe/boot, and now I usually just wear approach shoes. Currently I swear by these https://us.vibram.com/dw/image/v2/AA...ro.jpg?sh=1000 They have sticky Vibram soles that work well in mud and even better on rock (wet or dry). They are not GTX because lets face it, GTX is more or less useless for low-top shoes. They also have a stiffer blocked area along the inner fore foot for edging, which is excellent if you like to find your own routes up steep scrambles. If I'm going to be on a really muddy/wet route I'll still occasionally go with a mid-height approach shoe. Currently these are my go-tos for messy conditions https://images.internetstores.de/pro...en_Navy_Ciment[1000x700].jpg?forceSize=true&forceAspectRatio=true Again, its all about the sticky soles. You just don't get that kind of traction from hikers or most trail runners.

            Edit: My apologies. I didn't realize you were looking for more of a winter boot. Having more or less run the range of winter hikers I settled to using my old backpacking boots as winter boots: https://www.campsaver.com/mammut-mt-...boot-mens.html
            These are a little tough to find now, but they're an excellent alternative to heavy winter-dedicated boots for those of us who to tend to run a little too warm. They are not insulated but are made from a very thick and stiff leather, and their inner lining might as well be insulation. They're also semi-auto crampon compatible and are only slightly more flexible than a traditional mountaineering boot. I've found that wearing boots with too much flex in snowy conditions makes my arches ache after a while.
            My mind was wandering like the wild geese in the west.

            Comment


            • #7
              I am on my second pair of Limmer Boots, with the original almost 20yr old ultralight pair still going strong. Long known for custom fitting boots to fit odd feet (was then fairly expensive and with a long waiting period for delivery), but now their off-the-shelf standard sizes are a great value in a high quality boot. I have never had a more comfortable or better fitting boot. All leather, breathable and completely waterproof (when properly treated with Limmer Grease).
              Last edited by Nessmuk; 11-20-2017, 07:29 PM.
              "Leave the beaten track behind occasionally and dive into the woods. Every time you do you will be certain to find something you have never seen before." - Alexander Graham Bell

              Comment


              • #8
                If it's winter boots you're looking for then equally important to comfort/fit is warmth. Depending on your circulation you might want to get Keene Summit County winter boots. I got mine too big deliberately and wear two pairs of thick wool socks. On longer and colder days I wear a VBL next to my skin to keep my insulation dry. (I often go to the trouble of removing said VBL's half-way through the hike).
                Project-100: 100 peaks, one winter. https://project100singlewinter.wordpress.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by FlyFishingandBeer View Post
                  Over the years I have been consistently downgrading my footwear. I started with heavy, all-leather backpacking boots, then went down to a light hiker, then a mid-height approach shoe/boot, and now I usually just wear approach shoes. Currently I swear by these https://us.vibram.com/dw/image/v2/AA...ro.jpg?sh=1000 They have sticky Vibram soles that work well in mud and even better on rock (wet or dry). They are not GTX because lets face it, GTX is more or less useless for low-top shoes. They also have a stiffer blocked area along the inner fore foot for edging, which is excellent if you like to find your own routes up steep scrambles.
                  FlyFishingandBeer, what is the name of this model?


                  OK, It's Salewa Wildfire Pro:
                  https://us.vibram.com/salewa-wildfir...dfire-pro.html
                  https://www.salewa.com/men/footwear/...451_0000000015

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Yury View Post
                    FlyFishingandBeer, what is the name of this model?


                    OK, It's Salewa Wildfire Pro:
                    https://us.vibram.com/salewa-wildfir...dfire-pro.html
                    https://www.salewa.com/men/footwear/...451_0000000015
                    FlyFishingandBeer I also have the Salewas. They are comfy and were decently sticky. The soles wore down really quickly. I'm 100% ok with short sole life if they were SUPER sticky, but they were only just OK. IMO the price-to-stickiness ratio wasn't there. The sides of mine also wore away. But they were very comfortable and gave me no blisters, unlike a LOT of other sneakers that I've owned.
                    ADK 46/46W, Grid 237/552
                    Photos & Stuff

                    Comment


                    • FlyFishingandBeer
                      FlyFishingandBeer commented
                      Editing a comment
                      interesting that you only consider them OK as far as traction. I don't have the largest pool for comparison but over the past few years I've used:

                      Asolo TPS 520 GV
                      Brooks Cascadia (also my day to day shoes when not at work)
                      Mammut Mt. Trail XT GTX
                      Salomon XA Pro 3d GTX
                      Garmont Dragontail LT
                      Garmont Vetta MTN GTX (linked above)
                      La Sportiva Ultra Raptor

                      Compared to all of those except the Garmonts, the Wildfire Pros are insanely sticky. Still, I'm anything except loyal to my gear. If you know of an approach type shoe that offers better grip, I'd like to try them out and see if they become my new go-tos. My only requirement is that they have to have a heel brake edge for descending.

                      Bunchberry I wouldn't get too caught up in the brand of sole, rather which model of sole from a specific brand. For example, My Asolo 520s have a very popular Vibram hiking sole that might as well be made of glazed porcelain. They take forever to wear out and are "self cleaning" but they also have just about the worst traction of any hiking shoe I've ever used. I could actually stand on the wet slabs on Colden's south side and without making any effort to move, slide downhill. Now I only use them for walking my dogs around the neighborhood in bad weather. The Garmonts that you found have a really soft and sticky sole, but they're going to wear out really fast if you use them for anything besides hiking. Shoes like the 5.10 Guide Tennie which do not have Vibram soles are supposed to be one of the most comfortable and stickiest hiking shoes you can find. Some people are sketched out by them because companies like Patagonia, TNF, and Oboz have kind of given proprietary soles a bad name.

                  • #11
                    Thank you all very much for your replies! I was just looking at the Salewas yesterday.
                    Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
                    ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      Oh about the Trail runners. I would love to wear them because they are lighter but my legs would be destroyed. I just need more support and cushioning.
                      Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
                      ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        I've used a variety of different Asolo boots over the years. I need both the protection and support because of heavy gear loads I typically carry. They are extremely durable. That said, recently was having a lot of toe damage from said loads pressing foot downward - and then pushing the toes forward bumping the inside of boot. I needed to go a half size bigger to add some toe room. I ended up getting the La Sportiva Trango TRK GTX because the narrow heal works better for me with the larger size - my foot isn't swimming in them - just enough room. They grip a whole lot better than the Asolos generally speaking - but these will not be nearly as durable judging by the construction. They are light and a bit flexy...on the whole very happy with them.
                        www.brandtbolding.com

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          I forgot to tell you all I bought the oboz mid bridger. I wanted to buy it at the mountaineer in saratoga but they did not have my size so I picked up a pair at REI on long island.

                          Neil! Thanks for the winter boot suggestion. I will try and pick those up. I get those keene boots at dick;s it looks like. I have so good coupons for that store!
                          Leave No Trace! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jXO1uY0MvmQ
                          ThereAndBack http://www.hikesafe.com/

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            I'm curious to read what people are using for winter day hikes in the high peaks. I'm going to try my Lowa mountain experts, which are somewhat insulated, crampon-compatible mountaineering boots with a fairly stiff sole, but not completely rigid.

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X