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  • Hoka shoes?

    I'm currently torn between the toebox of the Lone Peaks and the cushion of the Hokas, however, I can't get Hokas anywhere local. Can anyone else who wears trail runners comment on the two? I'm not married to the zero-drop part of the Lone Peaks, but I love the super-wide toebox.
    46er #9404
    Pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/145945713@N02/
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  • #2
    Originally posted by All Downhill From Here View Post
    I'm currently torn between the toebox of the Lone Peaks and the cushion of the Hokas, however, I can't get Hokas anywhere local. Can anyone else who wears trail runners comment on the two? I'm not married to the zero-drop part of the Lone Peaks, but I love the super-wide toebox.
    Interesting. How are either of these for traction on ADK rock?

    Comment


    • moosebeware
      moosebeware commented
      Editing a comment
      Cory D. swears by the Hokas. I can't tolerate the high stack height. I tried though, last summer....couldn't do it.

  • #3
    I thought I saw some at the Mountaineer, maybe they have what you're looking for?
    ADK 46/46W, Grid 228/552
    Photos & Stuff

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    • #4
      Both the Hokas and Altras have very small lugs, and a lot of flat sole, I think they'll fare well on ADK rock, not so much on muddy or snowy trails (but maybe icy would be ok). I'm mostly looking at these for non-ADK hikes in New England, and a 2nd PCT attempt (the trails are flat and smooth out there).
      46er #9404
      Pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/145945713@N02/
      http://www.athikerpictures.org/syste...jpg
      https://smokebeard.wordpress.com/

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      • moosebeware
        moosebeware commented
        Editing a comment
        The other thing I found is that some shoes are so aggressive, with massive lugs that don't shed mud at all. Just something else to be aware of. Also, I have two pairs of trail runners, but different brands. My feet prefer the switching when on multiple days of hiking. Best of luck to you!

    • #5
      I tried a pair of Hokas and didn't like the thick soles. They felt like an ankle injury waiting to happen.

      While you didn't mention them as an option, the Cascadia 12's are a yyyuge improvement over the 11's now that they corrected the pinch points and widened the toe box.
      “Getting to the top is optional. Getting down is mandatory.” - Ed Viesturs

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      • #6
        I have a pair of Hoka trail runners that I wear for hiking. For me they grip fine and I don't notice the extra height. I don't think that my feet feel any better after a long day in the Hokas than they do in the other trail runners that I own - Montrail and Adidas.

        For what it's worth, I can't wear a zero drop shoe, since it would put too much strain on my achilles. There should be resources out there to help you figure out if a zero drop would work for you.
        ADKHP Wiki

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        • #7
          Hokas too cushy for me
          I like to feel the trail ( with my feet not my face )
          ​Wide toe box no pinch points = Montrail !!!!!
          ​Montrail Mountain Masochist III
          ​Montrail Caldorado

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          • #8
            this is a little OT from the OP, but since montrail has been brought up twice, I'm wondering if anyone can help me. I've been trying to re-create the magical relationship my feet had with the AT+ for 5 years now...mtn masochist is my current shoe but it's not quite there. The AT+ was a little warm and probably heavier than most would look for in a trail runner, but nothing else has even approximated the fit, comfort and stability for me (flat feet and severe pronation). any chance anyone else here had similar feelings for the AT+ and has found a suitable replacment? i'll probably try out a pair of caldorados at some point but not optimistic.

            Comment


            • FlyFishingandBeer
              FlyFishingandBeer commented
              Editing a comment
              Given that the Masochist and AT+ are both more of light hikers than a trail runner, maybe try something from the Garmont Dragontail series. I find the LT's to be excellent approach shoes for *dry* conditions; they definitely border on being a heavier trail runner. The MNT models are an awesome all-around shoe for the ADKS, IMO. I have the mid version which is no longer available in the US but it has the exact same construction as the current lows. The shoe is much lighter than a boot but also much sturdier than a sneaker. The soles are sticky and have a great downhill braking edge.

              https://www.garmontnorthamerica.com/...mens/approach/

              Another plus with these is that they are one of the first pairs of shoes that I've found that I don't have to wear Superfeet with. I have high arches and have found their factory footbeds to be suitable. You may want to consider hitting up a Fleet Feet or similar store where employees know how to properly fit Superfeet or other off-the-rack performance orthos to see if you can get your current kicks to fit better.

              Edit: I forgot to mention this, but for anyone in the market for new Montrails, they're now apparently under the Columbia umbrella. I'm not sure what effect this will have on their quality, but when boutique brands get bought out by conglomerates, changes are typically for the worse.

              https://www.adventure-journal.com/20...d-as-columbia/

            • FoulHooked
              FoulHooked commented
              Editing a comment
              thanks, i will definitely try to get my hands on some to try out. at first glance, they look very "approach-shoe," which isn't quite what i'm after (have some guide tennies already), but definitely worth looking into. have not ventured into garmont territory before, so appreciate the recco. looks like the trail beast might be a strong candidate as well (similar-looking last to AT+).

              at this point, i'm pretty experienced playing around with footbeds and orthotics. superfeet just haven't worked out for me...montrail enduros or sole for me. but there's only so much that insoles can fix.

          • #9
            Thanks for the info guys, I'm currently sitting the summer out with a broken foot but once my feet work again I'll be in the market. I need to go back and polish off the other 2300+ miles of the PCT.
            46er #9404
            Pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/145945713@N02/
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            • debmonster
              debmonster commented
              Editing a comment
              I wish that there was a "dislike" button, or frowny face, or whatever the kids are using these days for the broken foot, but I also give a definite "like' for going back to finish the rest!

          • #10
            Montrail / Columbia first 2 years = bad marriage.
            ​Starting with Caldorado, trans alp, and Masochist III Montrail is at an all time peak great design and DURABILITY !!
            I have 2 pair of old AT+ and wore out at least 3 other pair. ​I wore out 3 pair of Badrocks ( an all time favorite, light and great grip ) they had durability issues.
            ​The Masochist III is a lighter super comfortable true trail runner with great grip. the uppers will look brand new after soft sole is worn flat. These are much better than Masochist II and better than original by far.
            ​Caldorado is lighter than At. the open mesh is supper breathable and durable. they are great for all day hikes day after day after day. I wore these 2nd 1/2 of last summer for 32 peaks and many days with Neil bushwacking, light packing and moderate trail running. I waded rivers, mud, rain, rocks and roots. they dry out overnight and are ready to go in am. These are good for 12-16 hour 20 mile plus multi day hikes.
            ​TransAlp is as heavy as old AT's super durable and super aggressive sole that is great for MUD but not enough contact for slippery rock slopes in ADK's. They are the most narrow of the three and a bit longer toe. I use them for under 5 hour moderate muddy trail runs or hikes

            ​All of the above I have 4 pair of the montrail after market moldable in soles that I rotate for different shoes. The moldable in soles DO NOT ABSORB WATER !! so they dry out in an instant.
            I have had them for many many years and they outlast many pairs of shoes and make new shoes fit just like old shoes.

            Comment


            • FoulHooked
              FoulHooked commented
              Editing a comment
              Thanks MG, very helpful

          • #11
            Thanks, I'm willing to sacrifice durability for a) not breaking bones in my new shoes, and b) fewer blisters. I've discovered a "running" store here in RI so I might have some options.
            46er #9404
            Pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/145945713@N02/
            http://www.athikerpictures.org/syste...jpg
            https://smokebeard.wordpress.com/

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            • #12
              Does anyone have any experience with the Salomon Speedcross 3 trail runners? I'd like to try a pair out the year but I'm a little skeptical of the soles.
              “Getting to the top is optional. Getting down is mandatory.” - Ed Viesturs

              Comment


              • #13
                Geez, I don't know if this thread is making a lot of sense. I know the latest recommendations are for a breathable light shoe, but this is describing a flimsy shoe. Do you really want a flimsy shoe after a fracture? Hokas are one of the best choices for getting a trail runner through an ultra marathon. Not necessarily the right shoe for a (larger?) hiker whose feet fall apart, heading into a transcontinental hike.
                I might be kidding...

                Comment


                • FlyFishingandBeer
                  FlyFishingandBeer commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I actually agree with this to some extent, although its based on the wearer's physiology first and foremost. While the OP appears to be anything but a larger hiker, it seems as though the Hoka's cushy soles could actual exacerbate the injury by providing a soft area for the feet (or specifically, bones) to spread out into. For this exact reason (previous foot injury here) I prefer shoes with firm soles that help support rather than cushion my foot. Hence my above mentioned skepticism of the Speedcross 3's.

                  At the same time there's too many variable to say "XYZ isn't a good shoe for you." Things like his stride, strike, foot shape, weight, how tightly he laces them, pronation vs. supination, what socks he'll be wearing in them, etc., are all variables that he'll have to factor into determining if they'll help with his injury.

                • CatskillKev
                  CatskillKev commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I think there can be a confusion here when deciding footwear for a transcontinental hike. When you're generally unsupported, then you might not wear the same footwear as Scott Jurek or Karl Meltzer or Jennifer Pharr Davis. The first 2 anyway, went as ultra runners, which is what they are, and they did not carry enough extra to turn themselves into backpackers. It seems like when you get into the weight of a backpacker, then you might not want to wear the footwear of an ultra runner.

              • #14
                My goal is to stop the toe blisters, so I need a big toebox (hence the Altras). I've sorted the heel blisters by carving my superfeet into strange shapes. What I'm also looking for is cushion, walking in my Crestas or in the Oboz I started the PCT with, after about mile 10 each day is like walking barefoot on pavement - thud, thud, thud. However, since I may have actually broken the foot on day3, and walked on it for a few weeks, that might explain some of the shock-related pain. This is like looking for a supportive, yet cushiony mattress - I need something firm that doesn't let my foot flex too much and put undue stress on the bones, but also has a little shock absorbing capacity, to reduce the overall pain.
                46er #9404
                Pics: https://www.flickr.com/photos/145945713@N02/
                http://www.athikerpictures.org/syste...jpg
                https://smokebeard.wordpress.com/

                Comment


                • FlyFishingandBeer
                  FlyFishingandBeer commented
                  Editing a comment
                  You may want to consider some custom orthos if they are an option for you. They can be pretty pricey but many companies' insurance plans cover them nowadays. Having done this before, my advice is if the person uses a digital scanner for your feet rather than plaster, make absolute sure you think the image of your feet is perfect. This can be difficult if they take a scan while you're laying on your back with your feet in the air, pushing against the scanning machine.

              • #15
                I've used several pairs of Hokas (Stinson) over past year or so - specifically to help recover from a knee injury. Note, I sent Altra's back - too cheaply made and the zero drop too extreme. These are used ONLY on flat dirt or asphalt roads. I would never ever use them for hiking in the ADKs. The chance for ankle roll and possibility of injury/injuries would be in the 95-100 % range. Hike alone and you are asking for serious trouble. Aside from finding a toe box that has the necessary shape and room for you (which can be difficult) - I would suggest trying Injinji microfiber sock liners "with toes" - I used to get a lot of blisters...toes, ankles - have absolutely none after using these.
                www.brandtbolding.com

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                • All Downhill From Here
                  Editing a comment
                  I've always been suspicious of those socks, but given the testimonial I might try them. Large #s of people wear Altras on the PCT, which in many places is smoother travel than the ADKs, but they definitely work on more than just flat dirt.

                • brandtb
                  brandtb commented
                  Editing a comment
                  I suggested I would never use them in the ADKs specifically. Sure they could be used there - but with so many trail segments that are basically wet/muddy rubble filled stream beds - I would prefer something that had a decent amount of ankle support/protection/security. Not every one will want that of course. I got to the top of Giant a few weeks back and a family came up out of the woods to the summit from RPR - the husband was wearing...flip-flops.
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