Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Training, again

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Training, again

    I began light training last week. I logged 14.43 miles, so far, with a new record. I have an app called Endomondo that tracks my walking. It has a built in altimeter. It tracks my calories burned and time. Its nothing fancy, but it cover the simple things I'm looking for as I go along. My pace was always hanging around 1.5 MPH on a flat surface. I could do one mile around 30-35 min. Not bad for an out of shape fatty, but not what I was looking for. As my 46'r mentors kept telling me, keep walking and lose that weight. Also, change my diet. I knocked off the bad food to a considerable degree and did some light walking without the pack back in September. Nothing glorious, just a mile during lunch. As the cold weather set in, I caught another of my infamous sinus infections and had to cool it. The infection cleared after using my new favorite infection killer, Apple Cider Vinegar. Last week, I grabbed my pack and loaded it with 16 pounds of water bottles I keep for training with the weight. As I logged each walk, I noticed I was hovering around 2-2.6MPH pace. My joints were stiff from not walking in a couple of months, but nothing crippling. I adapted quickly. The weight did not bother me, either. Today, I maintained a 2.7MPH pace. I also completed the 3.6 mile loop three minutes faster and clocked 2.8 miles in one hour! I've felt pretty good and while walking in the cold triggers my cough, at times, I fight through it and keep going. For now, I will do a nice steady pace three times a week before upping the ante a bit. I'm planning on a hike at the end of Feb in Harriman State Park. Then, as time goes by, I will do my usual hikes to the VZ Bridge and beyond. I'm also looking at a really long hike to the other side of the bay at Rockaway Peninsula. About a 15 mile loop along the Belt Pkwy, across the Gil Hodges Bridge and taking a right down the Peninsula to Breezy Point. I will also be hiking more weekends in Harriman State Park up and down the ridges to work on my ascents and descents.

    I'm hoping this works and I can get in shape to work on my list better than the last couple of years. Hiking up Snowy Mountain was a great psychological boost for me, but if I could get up a High Peak in better time, that would make my life. I hope I don't disappoint.
    Nothing like being in the woods.

    http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

  • #2
    More and more outdoor adventurers getting addicted to GPS for one reason or another. People are even sleeping with it now. While it may have its pluses for inspiration, I don't think that its good.

    If anyone sees Gerard on the side of the road, don't give him a ride.
    I might be kidding...

    Comment


    • Gerard01
      Gerard01 commented
      Editing a comment
      I can never see anyone denying the G man a ride. lol

  • #3
    Nice work, Gerard! Using GPS enabled fitness apps can be a huge psychological boost when trying to make positive gains. They're great for keeping your progress organized and helping us set reasonable goals. Keep at it, but don't overdo it. Once you cross your plateau you'll see progress even faster.

    For those of us who weren't born with the genes for Olympian physiques, keeping those sugars and starches limited during sedentary periods is an absolute must. Finding balance between having enough energy and not accruing extra weight can be tough, but it sounds like you're well on your way to fine tuning it now.
    My mind was wandering like the wild geese in the west.

    Comment


    • Gerard01
      Gerard01 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks. One thing I try never to do is overdo it. I'm a stickler for nice and steady. Unless, like one day on Noonmark, I had to move my ass due to a thunder storm that came rolling over the Great Range like a freight train. I never moved so fast, in life.

  • #4
    Originally posted by Gerard01 View Post
    I began light training last week. I logged 14.43 miles, so far, with a new record. I have an app called Endomondo that tracks my walking.
    Welcome back Gerard!

    Your training regimen may not be sufficient for your goals.
    There is a risk that your leg muscles may not have enough strength.
    I would recommend to add hill walking (if you have any hill nearby), stair walking (stepping on every other stair when going up and when going down stepping on each stair or taking an elevator) or walking on a treadmill setup at maximum incline in a gym.

    Good luck!

    Comment


    • Gerard01
      Gerard01 commented
      Editing a comment
      Hi, Yury, thanks. Right now, I'm just limbering up. The only things close to hills within 5 miles of me is in Prospect Park. I'm right below the ridge line that runs from Brooklyn Heights through the rest of Long Island. I usually hike up and down along the small hills. There is also Grymes Hill in Staten Island, I use to practice on. Its about 350 feet. After that, the higher hills are in Harriman State Park. Then, the Catskills.

  • #5
    Originally posted by CatskillKev View Post
    More and more outdoor adventurers getting addicted to GPS for one reason or another. People are even sleeping with it now. While it may have its pluses for inspiration, I don't think that its good.

    If anyone sees Gerard on the side of the road, don't give him a ride.
    Do we have a "beating a dead horse" emoticom?
    Ah, we do!
    Project-100: 100 peaks, one winter. https://project100singlewinter.wordpress.com/

    Comment


    • #6
      Gerald, with respect to your training, think:
      • continuity (ie. regular training),
      • gradual increases in training load and speed
      • modulation (ie. increase for two weeks then fall back on week three. Repeat over and over but increase the load over the months.).
      Project-100: 100 peaks, one winter. https://project100singlewinter.wordpress.com/

      Comment


      • Gerard01
        Gerard01 commented
        Editing a comment
        Thanks, Neil. I'm following your page and reading the Project 100 page and going over your hiking fitness toolbox. Since, I'm just taking it slow, I'll concentrate on continuity, then part two until I reach Modulation.
        since, my lungs are not what they used to be, I'd like to get them in shape. So, far, no troubles, but its early. When I start moving uphill, thats the test.

      • Gerard01
        Gerard01 commented
        Editing a comment
        on weights, I don't own any, so I guess I'll just have to walk and move uphill to strengthen my legs. I can't afford a gym, but outdoors was always my gym. I'll have to work around that, if i can. The food part is easy to follow. I've been chowing on mixed nuts and fruits. Eating more yogurt and grain cereals in small amounts. For lunch, I'll some vegetables with a Peanut butter and Jelly sandwich. Also, a small cup of chicken noodle soup. Dinner will consist of chicken or tuna. Sometimes, a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. Celery and carrots for a snack. I'm playing around with the food combos. I won't say, I cheat here and there with a slice of pizza or a small fried rice. I never said I was a Saint..lol. I'll do the best I can. I'll see where I am a month from now.

      • Yury
        Yury commented
        Editing a comment
        "since, my lungs are not what they used to be".
        How do you know that your lungs are limiting your hiking speed?
        A simple oximeter would allow to measure blood oxygenation % and determine whether it's your lungs or your heart:
        https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_s...words=oximeter.

        In most people (except people with pulmonary disease) heart is a bottleneck and oxygenation % is 99% regardless of exertion.

    • #7
      One person I know was talking about the value of " step ups" for developing muscles to climb hills when there are no hills in your locale.

      For example, this person will go to one of those trails in his local park that has stations with wooden apparatus for push ups, pull-ups, balance walking, etc. At any station that has a sturdy "bench" form he will do 10 "step ups" first on one leg, then the other. He goes for smooth flow on the way up and the way down developing core strength/stability, and quad strength, and ankle stability. He will do three loops of that little fitness trail, getting about five repeats per loop of step-ups at various heights from 12 to 15". It's free. It's local. It's an idea.

      Any responses regarding potential benefits/pitfalls to this sort of training?
      46/46, 13/46w "I only went out for a walk, and concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in." John Muir

      Comment


      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        I recommend step-ups as well. No need for expensive equipment here. I went to the local Home Depot and bought two foot-tall cinder blocks. They cost just a few bucks each. Place them side by side and you have a platform to step up onto with each foot - plus it adds some stability as one standing alone would tip over but two together creates a solid base. I'll do anywhere from 1200-1500 step-ups in an hour workout (that's 20-25 per minute, or one every 2.4-3.0 seconds if you break it down). One could probably go faster but I'm extra careful with foot placement on the way down to avoid ankle/knee injuries (the pitfall). Sometimes I do it with no weight and sometimes I'll throw a 10-15 pound pack on. Great leg workout and once you get moving a good cardio workout as well. And you never have to leave the house to do it. Watch TV while doing it and the time flies right by.

      • Yury
        Yury commented
        Editing a comment
        Makwa, what are benefits of using such stepping blocks over regular stairs?
        Stair walking works OK for me.

      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        Stairs are fine. The big benefit for me is being able to stand in front of a TV while doing it. And the cinder block is 12 inches tall whereas the riser on a stair is only about 7 or 8 inches. You're pushing your weight up a greater distance... a bigger step requiring a little more effort. In the overall scheme of things not a huge deal probably. Taking steps two at a time would defeat that one argument.

    • #8
      At Prospect Park there is a hill that has series of steps leading to the summit. There are also steep trails leading up. The Hill is about 275 feet in heigh. I add up how much an actual ascent is and then try to do that up and down through the day.
      Nothing like being in the woods.

      http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

      Comment


      • #9
        Don't want to turn this into a blog of training. I'll post here and there. Today, I did 3.71 miles in1:22:41 with a 2.7mph pace. Pack felt like it was not there. Came back feeling good. Forgot mhy knee brace, but the knees held up good. No aches or pains. Tomorrow, I may head to Prospect Park to try the stairs leading up to the summit of Prospect Hill. The hill is about 270 feet. any ideas how many time to go up an down?
        Nothing like being in the woods.

        http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

        Comment


        • CatskillKev
          CatskillKev commented
          Editing a comment
          3 times. Not sure I'd wear the pack, but I'm not into packs, anyway. Not sure if it pays to add weight when knees are a weakness.

          Look at it this way. I believe you touched on wanting to lose weight. Well, look at the weight you lose as the pack you can carry later.
          Last edited by CatskillKev; 02-05-2018, 02:02 PM.

      • #10
        Speaking of step-ups I included in my workouts 3 series of 12 reps with 60 pounds, 3x/week for 6 months. Then when Dec. 21 drew closer I switched to 110 pounds and 5 reps at a 90 degree knee and hip angle. Also did the same with less weight and a higher step.
        Project-100: 100 peaks, one winter. https://project100singlewinter.wordpress.com/

        Comment


        • #11
          If you are plagued by sinus infections that come and go you might care to see an ENT. That was me and eventually it was discovered by ct scan and x-ray I had an infection that antibiotics would almost kill but come back awhile later because it sat on top of one tooth. I had the tooth pulled and viola. no more infections.

          Comment


          • Gerard01
            Gerard01 commented
            Editing a comment
            Interesting. I do have a broken molar tooth that has acted up from time to time. I've been using the Apple Cider Vinegar, which kills any infection, now. I know it has to be pulled. It's way too damaged to be repaired.

        • #12
          I really envy those of you that live close enough to anything resembling uneven terrain that you can train on. Nothing like that is near enough to me to warrant the drive. The only real training I get is bicycling about 2000 miles/yr on the dirt path along the Erie Canal when it's warm enough and during the winter it's a stationary bike in the basement in front of the tv followed by swimming at the local college. Not really what I would call training specifically for hiking in the hills but it does help. Could probably add the Makwa cinder block routine.

          Buck

          Comment


          • Gerard01
            Gerard01 commented
            Editing a comment
            Any way you can train, train.

          • FlyFishingandBeer
            FlyFishingandBeer commented
            Editing a comment
            What section of the canal?

        • #13
          Gerard01-Unfortunately for me the tooth was good, so now I'm missing one. I had fought the infection for so long it had destroyed cartilage and bone in my cheek and worked its way to the tooth. I feared the surgery to both pull and repair but it maybe took a half hour max while awake. Good luck.

          Comment


          • #14
            Today was a good training day. Set a new record. Did my usual 3.62 miles at a 2.9mph pace and finished in 1:15:44. Felt very good. I know 3.62 miles is nothing compared to everyone else, but since getting started was a mere warm up, I feel good about starting out after a few months on the shelf.
            Nothing like being in the woods.

            http://www.gerardsadirondackpics.shutterfly.com

            Comment


            • #15
              Originally posted by Gerard01 View Post
              since, my lungs are not what they used to be, I'd like to get them in shape.
              Yesterday I spent some time reading discussions and articles on https://www.uphillathlete.com. When reading https://www.uphillathlete.com/dont-call-it-cardio/ and https://www.uphillathlete.com/max-vo2-myth/ I have realized that you may have three potential bottlenecks limiting your hiking speed:
              - Ability of your lungs to oxygenate blood
              - Ability of your heart to pump enough blood to your leg muscles
              - Ability of your leg muscles to efficiently convert fuel (fats and carbohydrates) and oxygen into mechanical work.

              I am not sure whether this distinction is very important.
              It was counterintuitive to me, but after reading this article it seems to me that ability of my leg muscles to efficiently burn fuel may be (partially?) responsible for my hiking limits.
              ----------
              Later comment.
              After additional reading of other articles on the same site I came to a conclusion that leg muscles metabolism can be a bottleneck in a highly trained person like Neil.
              In my case my heart is most likely a bottleneck.
              Last edited by Yury; 02-17-2018, 12:31 AM.

              Comment


              • Gerard01
                Gerard01 commented
                Editing a comment
                I have had trouble with my lungs for years. Pneumonia, bronchitis, sinus infections. I do breathing exercises while I am hiking. breathing through my nose and exhaling in short bursts. I have more days ahead, so we will see how I do, but I am always open to ideas. keep them coming. Hopefully, I can win back some hiking partners. I have not impressed many people the last few years. I was hoping to be far into my list, by now.

              • Gerard01
                Gerard01 commented
                Editing a comment
                thanks for those links. Very interesting. I saved the link and will read more.
            Working...
            X