Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How well do you know the Soda Range (Nun-da-gao)?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How well do you know the Soda Range (Nun-da-gao)?

    If you know this area well (north of Hurricane Mountain), then I'd like to pick your brains.

    ​I recently modified this area in OpenStreetMap and added trails, stream, marshes, lean-tos, campsites, etc. However, I haven't hiked there in over 15 years so I may have made a few mistakes. http://www.openstreetmap.org/#map=14/44.2588/-73.7262

    I put a bridge on the trail right next to the parking area but I'm not sure the stream comes that close to the cars or even if there's a bridge!

    All other water-crossings have been marked as a "ford" (not visible on the map but you have to specify something whenever a trail/road intersects a waterway). Perhaps that's incorrect and there are other bridges along the way?

    The DEC's name for the parking area is a rather long-winded "Gulf Brook, Little and Big Crow blablabla". However, I believe the local name for it may be "Crow Clearing"?

    I guessed at the shape of the parking area from a rather fuzzy aerial image.

    The map showed O'Toole Road (or should that be O'Toole Lane?) running beyond the parking area and almost halfway to Gulf Brook Lean-to. I ended the road at the parking area and converted the rest from road to trail.

    The trail to Little Crow starts from O'Toole and runs along someone's driveway (?), past their house, and then ducks into the woods. Is that correct?

    There's supposed to be parking at the start of the trail to Little Crow but I can't discern anything from aerial images. I assume there's a very small pulloff there or is just "park on the shoulder"?

    A few feet west of where the trail to Little Crow begins, the map shows a short "hockey stick" shaped residential road running north. There's absolutely nothing in the aerial imagery to confirm it exists. Perhaps it is an error and meant to represent the driveway that the trail uses?

    I don't have precise coordinates for the lean-tos so I just eyeballed their location. I’m not 100% certain I positioned them on the correct side of the trails that run past them. The location of the campsites was also approximated.

    There are probably other quirks I encountered that I can’t recall at the moment. Anyway, at the very least, the area is now better defined in OSM.
    Looking for Views!

  • #2
    I can help somewhat...There is a hiking bridge right away literally 5 steps from the parking area. The parking area is called Crow Clearing. The parking area consists of a circular loop of the road at the end of O'Toole Lane that is very small (perhaps 100 feet of road) and that circles around an old farmhouse cellar hole (now filled with trees and barely noticeable). People park anywhere off this small loop. The 2 trails leave this loop on opposite sides of the tree filled cellar hole and while they are just 10 seconds apart, you can't see either trailhead from one another.. The parking lot still has the feel of the old farm and clearing to it but not nearly as much as 30 years ago of course. The barn foundation is 10 seconds up the trail, just across the foot bridge, on the immediate left. There is an old dam up the stream (5 minutes of bushwacking) from the parking area and an old road leaves the dam and joins the hiking trail 4 minutes from the parking area. An old road did continue past Crow Clearing and it is now the hiking trail. The old road/current hiking trail continued roughly a mile past Crow Clearing, going past the old Gulf Brook Leanto site (another 5 minutes or so) to a clearing that is just past where the hiking trail leaves the old road and takes a 90 degree left turn, up towards Lost Pond.. This clearing contains remains of both an old logging camp and a more recent farm dwelling. The old Gulf Brook Leanto was torn down and moved maybe 5 years ago. It used to be on the north side of the stream in the crotch where the trails split (east of the trail split). You have the leanto south of the stream...But the leanto's prior location is irrelevant as it now is 5 more minutes up the trail, on the left (north) side of the trail, just a minute or two before the old logging camp and sharp turn of the hiking trail.. This would be a touch more east than your camping symbol now is. Hope this helps a bit, others can chime in about Little Crow and it's lower trail approach (the lower, Little Crow Trail leaves from Hurricane Road, not O'Toole by the way)...

    Comment


    • #3
      Many, many thanks for all your help!

      Looking for Views!

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with Festus's comments and sent you a couple of GPS tracklogs via email. The new location for the Gulf Brook lean-to is perhaps 0.1 mile farther up the trail and located about 100 ft from the outlet brook of Lost Pond. This site was approved by DEC and APA as an amendment of the UMP which called for removal of the lean-to at its old location on the trail to Hurricane Mt (too close to the brook).

        Comment


        • #5
          What are the origins of each of the ranges' monikers?
          1111111111

          Comment


          • #6
            The story I have heard is that locals "invented" the Nundagao name when they cut the trail (some 70 years ago?), because they wanted to give it a fake "Indian sounding" name. I'm not sure about Soda Range, but I think the rock in the area is crumbly and rich in salty minerals and that may be part of the origin. See other nearby names such as Red Rock, Potash Mountain, and Coal Dirt Hill.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by tcd View Post
              The story I have heard is that locals "invented" the Nundagao name when they cut the trail (some 70 years ago?), because they wanted to give it a fake "Indian sounding" name. I'm not sure about Soda Range, but I think the rock in the area is crumbly and rich in salty minerals and that may be part of the origin. See other nearby names such as Red Rock, Potash Mountain, and Coal Dirt Hill.
              Possibly true, but I've always assume because the area had/has so much oak that it was cut, burned and water poured thru the ashes to create potash/soda.
              The new leanto is just as close to water as the old one. And there was nothing wrong with the old one. What a waste.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by tcd View Post
                The story I have heard is that locals "invented" the Nundagao name when they cut the trail (some 70 years ago?), because they wanted to give it a fake "Indian sounding" name. I'm not sure about Soda Range, but I think the rock in the area is crumbly and rich in salty minerals and that may be part of the origin. See other nearby names such as Red Rock, Potash Mountain, and Coal Dirt Hill.
                The fake charm of the Indian name sounds familiar. There is a little mountain (Clark Mtn.) near Jay that is often referred to as Sequoia.
                Nature we have always with us, an inexhaustible storehouse of that which moves the heart, appeals to the mind, and fires the imagination - health to the body, a stimulus to the intellect, and a joy to the soul. - John Burroughs

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by dundee View Post

                  Possibly true, but I've always assume because the area had/has so much oak that it was cut, burned and water poured thru the ashes to create potash/soda.
                  The new leanto is just as close to water as the old one. And there was nothing wrong with the old one. What a waste.
                  Oaks, specifically red oaks, are relatively uncommon in this area which is at the edge of their range. They can be seen mostly on south facing slopes along the Crows and on the new trail to Jay Mountain, also with red pines. I haven't seen any oaks on Oak Ridge; it is mostly maple and birch probably because the oaks were all cut out long ago. Charcoal was a valuable commodity and "cash crop" for farmers in the 1800s to fuel the iron forges which were active in the area.

                  Despite local efforts to the contrary, the Gulf Brook lean-to was deemed in the UMP to be too close to the brook to allow improvements (a new roof was badly needed). Thanks to the efforts of the Forest Ranger and Forester, the new site was located and the formal applications to amend the UMP were presented and approved by DEC and APA. The move and renovation of the lean-to was done by the Hurricane Chapter of ADK and Lean2rescue. Yes, the lean-to is again close of a small stream (outlet of Lost Pond) but I was told the "water rule" for lean-tos pertains to "major streams" and this location was approved. Gulf Brook was considered a major stream and the lean-to was also too close to the trail--two strikes against it.

                  I heard from a reputable source that the Nundagao was indeed made up. Looking at it, one can move the "o" to the beginning and come up with onundaga, which is almost Onondaga, the Indian Nation south of Syracuse. But of course, the Onondagas had nothing to do with the Adirondacks.

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X