Forum Rules Statement of Purpose Membership Disclaimer Site History
Adkhighpeaks Foundation Donations and Online Store Adkhighpeaks Wiki visit ADKForum.com

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Emergency Preparedness

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Plastic bags for your feet.

    ​You aren't obliged to use them as vapor-barriers (but they do a good job of it). In the event you break through ice and immerse one or more feet (I have the ignoble honor of experiencing this sensation), you'll probably want to change your socks (you have spare socks, right?). However, your boot linings are wet and it won't be long until your nice dry sock becomes equally wet.

    That's where the plastic bag comes into play. Put it on over the dry sock and now stick your foot into the damp boot. The bag will prevent the dry sock from soaking up water from the boot linings. It won't be perfect but better than no bag at all.

    ​It goes without saying that you should do all of this very quickly. Don't wait long enough for your feet or boots to cool down. That would be regrettable.


    ​One more thing: plastic bags aren't just for winter. I carry them year round in case, while wearing trail runners, I run into some freakishly cold weather and the trails turn into brooks of water and/or slush. Cheap, lightweight insurance.
    Looking for Views!

    Comment


    • autochromatica
      autochromatica commented
      Editing a comment
      If you have a link to your snowshoe field repair thread handy, that's also really good insurance.

    • mastergrasshopper
      mastergrasshopper commented
      Editing a comment
      plastic bags !!!! YES
      small thin ( like produce bags )
      I used as emergency overboots for stream crossing in Nov. wore them over my trail runners.
      another wet trail runner idea is the 2 bag system. one next to foot VBL then dry wool sock then second bag to keep sock dry.
      this is great for early season great range trail runs past snowbird where there can be a few feet of wet snow in late April / may.
      mid size bags make great dry sack inside pack.
      large contractor bags are great for stream crossings up to knee deep, think IPB, Opal and Hudson before rebuilt bridges.
      Here is best technique: place boot in bag, wrap thin nylon cord around bag and place foot in snowshoes or micros to hold in place and protect bag from sharp rocks. The rope keeps the bags from billowing out and holds them up. MSR EVO's are best with no nylon straps to hold water and an even gravel stream bed. Micro's are best for uneven boulders.

  • #17
    Stay dry. Use your head. Know your limits and the limits of your equipment. If things go sour, and eventually they will in some form or another, stay calm. These things apply universally in a variety of recreational pursuits.
    Adopt a natural resource. Give back.

    Comment


    • #18
      Originally posted by Commissionpoint View Post
      Stay dry.
      FWIW... I've found that the combo of a Patagonia Capilene base layer and a Marmot DriClime windshirt has kept me the driest/warmest of any pairing I have tried. And I sweat a lot. The outside of the DriClime windshirt can be soaking wet but the inside and capilene base layer stay very dry. Throw your softshell over the top and you have a pretty good system.

      For anybody wishing to buy a Therm-a-Rest pad but not wanting to carry the pound of weight of the 72" model they do make 48" pads that weighs in at 8.5 oz and cost half as much as the full-size pads. I bought their RidgeRest SOLite model (currently $19.95 on Amazon but I got it on sale for $14.95) and found that I can fit on it on the fetal position. Has an R-value of 2.8 and gets you up off the ground. I probably won't carry it on short-ish hikes but anything long or above the treeline I'm strapping it on my pack.

      Comment


      • Makwa
        Makwa commented
        Editing a comment
        Interesting idea. I wonder how well it would hold up to being carted around on the outside of a pack. Or even inside where it got crinkled and crushed by other gear. Let us know if you ever get some. Would love to hear the review.

      • Natlife
        Natlife commented
        Editing a comment
        This type of bubblewrap foil faced insulation is nowhere near r8. I you research it a bit you will find it's actually around r0.75. Just pick a piece and sit on the snow for 20 minutes and repeat the process with a 1 inch thick r5 extruded poly foam (like corning formular pink foam). You will notice the difference.

      • Trail Boss
        Trail Boss commented
        Editing a comment
        I've used that stuff to make a cozy for camp pots. It doesn't melt on contact with boiling-hot aluminum pots.

        I recall seeing a backpacker with a roll of it lashed to his pack. As you can probably imagine, it's not abrasion resistant and I found several little pieces of it along the trail in his wake.

        BTW, Mylar was developed as insulation for spacecraft. It reflects radiant heat. In the vacuum of space, there's no air to allow for heat to conduct via convection. The spacecraft isn't in contact with anything so there's *no* heat loss via conduction. Therefore a simple reflective surface does a very good job of reflecting the sun's radiant heat and keeping the spacecraft's interior cooler because convection and conduction aren't a factor in space.

        If all this sounds like the inside walls of a vacuum bottle (Thermos), you're right. The vacuum surrounding the hot contents doesn't allow for convection or conduction (except for the bottle's mouth). The silvery insides reflect the hot contents' radiant heat so it remains trapped within the bottle. Sort of the opposite of what Mylar blankets do for spacecraft.

        The same is *NOT* true on planet earth!! A Mylar/space/emergency blanket is waterproof and windproof but it fails to prevent heat loss through conduction (you sitting on it on the cold ground) and through convection when cold air moves across the blanket's heated surface (heated by you). It does reduce loss through radiation but that's just one out of three routes.

        You need a layer of vacuum or, because that's kind of impractical, a material that traps air ("dead air") to resist loss through convection within the trapped air itself. That's where down and synthetic insulators come into the picture. BTW, even the batts of fiberglass insulation used in homes can permit convection currents to form within them. The more "dead" the air, the better.
        Last edited by Trail Boss; 02-02-2017, 08:39 AM.

    • #19
      Per autochromatica's request, here's how to field-repair broken rivets and clevis pins on an MSR Evo Ascent snowshoe using a handful of cheap hardware and the tip of a knife blade (or screwdriver if you have one).

      ​From here: http://www.adkhighpeaks.com/forums/f...sr-evo-ascents



      You can field-repair an Evo's broken rivets and clevis pins using this:
      1. 10-32 x 1/2 inch machine screw
      2. 10-32 locknut
      3. flat washer
      The tip of a knife blade can serve as a screwdriver. You don't need pliers; the locknut can be adequately held in place between thumb and index finger. Much easier to operate than the tiny wire-ring that comes with MSR's clevis pins.

      The machine screw's ideal head shape would be "pan" but "round" or "dome" are more commonly available.

      The hole diameter for an Evo's rivets and clevis pins is the same; the 10-32 screw fits perfectly.

      The screw's drive should be Phillips (use tip of knife) or Slot (use knife blade) or a Phillips/Slot combo.

      The flat washer should be less than a 1/2-inch in diameter. It is needed for replacing the rivets used in an Evo's bindings. It is not needed for replacing clevis pins.

      A locknut is much easier to use in the field compared to the combination of a nut and lock-washer.

      To replace a clevis pin, use the machine screw and locknut.

      To replace a rivet, slip the washer onto the screw and insert it through the top of the binding. Thread the locknut on from below. The washer may not be necessary if you can find a machine screw with a very broad head of about 3/8" to 1/2" in diameter (rare).


      Here are examples of what's available from Home Depot. Total cost is about $3 and allows you to fix at least four failed rivets/clevis pins.

      6-pack of 10-32 x 1/2-inch Phillips-Slotted Pan-Head Machine Screws

      4-pack of 10-32 Nylon Locknuts

      1/4-inch flat washers
      Looking for Views!

      Comment


      • FlyFishingandBeer
        FlyFishingandBeer commented
        Editing a comment
        I mentioned this elsewhere in the thread: Lowes now sells little aluminum screws/nuts that are specifically designed for replacing busted rivets. A pack of 8 in the standard modern snowshoe size (I don't have them in front of me, I can get back to you on size) cost me something like $1.98. I've never had to fix a broken clevis pin thankfully, but I've had to replace a fews rivets on my old LG's.

    • #20
      I have seen it suggested to use a light strand called a "luminoodle" to mark where the trail enters a bald summit to light the way back for the return trip. Another suggestion I have seen by someone who was planning a South American mountaineering expedition and wanted to practice using bamboo stakes with flags. Anyone with any experience with these types of things for a socked in summit. Obviously, map and compass should be used, but an external reminder seems like a good idea, though it does add something else to carry and also needs to be picked up on the way out.

      Comment


      • Yury
        Yury commented
        Editing a comment
        Luminoodle is way too heavy - 200 g + a battery. Neil's method of leaving a spare headlamp is much better.

      • FlyFishingandBeer
        FlyFishingandBeer commented
        Editing a comment
        Chem lights, or "glow sticks." You can get a case of them on Amazon for a few $ and the blue or white ones will "burn" for 12 hours. They each come with a little string for hanging them (hence the slightly juvenile name: rescue tampons). If placed up off the ground they'll be visible for at least 50 feet in low light conditions, even if its blowing, and hundreds of feet if its clear. When you go to collect it on your way down you can rehang it from your pack and make yourself more visible to your partner or other hikers from behind.

      • bfinan0
        bfinan0 commented
        Editing a comment
        Stakes with, and without, flags are standard trail markers above treeline in Slovakia. I know this is different since they are semi-permanent and designed to last an entire snow season, but I did find them quite effective.

    • #21
      Here's a shot of that
      It had gotten dark and snow was kicking up. The trail was obvious but the snow seemed to be increasing. On that critical cairn before the route flattens out I decided to place my extra headlamp and put it on strobe. Turned out to be unnecessary but it sure looked cool!
      Actually, based on those pics, I think I left it on continuous, not strobe.
      Project Full Deck Blog.
      Make a "Full-Deck" Donation to SAR

      Comment


      • All Downhill From Here
        Editing a comment
        Much better than stakes - a) it's obvious it's there, b) it's your own spare, so you're motivated to pick it up and most importantly, c) "the trail was obvious but the snow seemed to be increasing" - its an emergency measure for safety, by someone with the skills and wisdom to have been up there in the first place.

    • #22
      Two is One and One is None. It's repeated so often that it starts to lose it's impact but it's important I think. I obviously don't carry redundant items for everything in my pack but for what I deem to be the most critical items I do.

      * Maps. One in my pocket. One or two in the pack. In ziplocks.
      * GPS and 2 Compasses. First compass is a nice map compass with baseplate. The 2nd is a little crummy one weighing only 6g.
      * Fire starters. Lighter, waterproof matches, and magnesium fire starter.
      * Headlamps. Two.
      * Batteries - backups for GPS and headlamps.
      * Water treatment. Depending on itinerary I'll carry one of the following: Katadyn Hiker Pro, Steripen, or a Lifestraw. Backup is iodine tablets.
      * Paracord. Backup shoelaces!
      * Dry layers of clothing.

      And the backups are never kept directly with the primary item so it's nearly impossible to lose or break both at the same time.

      And as mentioned by others already but worth repeating... carry a repair kit to fix microspikes, snowshoes, and other gear.

      Lastly, knowing how to use all of the gear you carry is important. What good is lugging something all over the place if you can't figure out what to do with it once you're stuck in an emergency? Learn how to use your gear before leaving home. Just checking items off a 10 Essentials or recommended gear list and shoving them in your pack does you little good if you can't figure out what to do with them once you're in trouble. And check your gear every so often to make sure it's still in working order, that the batteries are fresh, and to replenish items that have been used.

      Comment


      • TFR
        TFR commented
        Editing a comment
        We lead hikes for the 3500 club and people literally arrive at the trailhead with new gear still wrapped in the original packing material! We've had to explain how to put on gaiters, spikes, crampons, snowshoes, and probably a few other items...

    • #23
      Another thought- I strongly believe that anyone who hikes and camps regularly has an obligation to get certified in Wilderness First Aid. When you factor in how much time and money we spend on hiking, the committment to a WFA course (2 days and ~$150-$200) is small in comparison. And the experience gained will help any hiker to be better prepared not just to deal with common backcountry injuries and ailments, but to prevent at least some of them from occurring in the first place. Early recognition of environmentally-related ailments (hyperthermia, hypothermia, dehydration, etc.) is especially important.

      Comment


      • All Downhill From Here
        Editing a comment
        Or ANY first aid course. I think the Red Cross did one for $50 or something a while back, a cert I needed for a job. I think it was both FA and CPR, a few 1 hour sessions if memory serves.

      • bfinan0
        bfinan0 commented
        Editing a comment
        I would give this an asterisk, just on the grounds that most, if not all, WFA courses require actually getting out in the wilderness to take the course. I know it's not quite the same but I would say Red Cross Responding To Emergencies/ first aid Level 3 is at least relevant, if not ideal?

      • All Downhill From Here
        Editing a comment
        I just meant that ANY first aid training is better than none, for instance if you can't get to the woods, or dont have the money, etc. etc..

    • #24
      This is, hands down, one of the most specific and helpful threads I have read, and perfectly timed as we ramp up for winter day hikes. Emergency preparedness is, by definition, seldom used, but exceedingly important information. Thanks for the refresher.

      My tendency is to carry too much weight in my pack at any season, in the name of preparedness. So, while I am not a minimalist, I would be interested in comments aimed at the top 3-5 weight hogs in winter and recommended substitutions/work-a rounds that tip the winter pack to the lighter side in favor of less exhaustion/safer hiking? It is also true we go out as a party of two, most often (our schedules just don't jibe with most folks). Yes, I know hiking in groups of 4 is the recommended best practice.

      For example, we have a -20 degree sleeping bag now, and a Bothy bag, full length insulation pad, and white gas stove/fuel--stuff to take care if one of us i Imomobilized, but I am concerned the weight begins to out-weigh the safety for a party of two.

      Comments?
      46/46, 13/46w "I only went out for a walk, and concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in." John Muir

      Comment


      • All Downhill From Here
        Editing a comment
        I've heard that your pack weight should be no more than 1/4 of yours (assuming you're at a healthy weight). I've gone up over 1/3 a few times, and it starts to suck pretty badly as you approach 1/2 your weight.

      • WinterWarlock
        WinterWarlock commented
        Editing a comment
        For Yury's comment about sitting, I go to the local FedEx office and pick up a few of their large Tyvek envelopes...I put a small piece of an old sleeping mat in it, seal it up and stuff in the pack. Insulated and waterproof!

      • KV Streamer
        KV Streamer commented
        Editing a comment
        @Makwa: Thanks for the link to the winter weight post--it is just the kind of discussion I was looking for. I also just came upon Chris Lang's article in Fall 2016 ADKPeeks 46r magazine- it references gear/preparation/weight in relation to winter slide climbing, "while having every safety item may be great insurance, in the dead of winter carrying all those extra items may be the deciding factor between success and failure of an objective." He goes on to include the role of fitness and experience in making decisions based on conditions.

        @Yury: your comment about versatility to move slowly or sit overnight in puffy jacket with half pad is well put. We carry puffy jacket/pants in addition to gear mentioned. Something to consider.

        @All Downhilll From Here: ratio of pack weight to body weight plays in as well. We try to keep summer weekend pack weight with food and water in that 35-40 lb. range. Winter day-pack weight without water is 26 lbs.

        General take aways for me: A thoughtful selection/reduction of gear, coupled with increased pre-season fitness/endurance will increase my enjoyment.

    • #25
      Makwa touched on redundancy. This is a good plan, and can be accomplished through many different ways. e.g.

      - Compass, one in my pocket, sun/stars and terrain association techniques are backup.
      - Maps, one in my pocket, one in my head.
      - Hiking partner(s). Usually carrying everything I am carrying. If my headlamp dies, and my spare batteries die (happened while skiing last weekend), my partner also had a set of spares which I pilfered. With a few partners, divy up the emergency gear to save weight.

      Comment


      • #26
        Originally posted by Trail Boss View Post

        You can field-repair an Evo's broken rivets and clevis pins using this:
        1. 10-32 x 1/2 inch machine screw
        2. 10-32 locknut
        3. flat washer
        ...

        Here are examples of what's available from Home Depot. Total cost is about $3 and allows you to fix at least four failed rivets/clevis pins.

        6-pack of 10-32 x 1/2-inch Phillips-Slotted Pan-Head Machine Screws

        4-pack of 10-32 Nylon Locknuts

        1/4-inch flat washers
        I just "rediscovered" my old MSR repair kit:
        Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_1794_MSR_repair_kit45p.jpg
Views:	1
Size:	22.3 KB
ID:	2468


        The price (to the best of my recollection) was $10 to $15 at MEC. Now I see a similar kit for CDN$ 102.99 https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B0010Y4VL4/.

        I kind of neglected this kit and was not carrying it with me.
        Should I put it into my backpack?
        It seems too heavy. I am thinking about removing two rubber straps and keeping only one.

        My another concern is that I would not be able to replace a pin when it's cold and windy.
        It seems like this job should be done with bare fingers.

        Do you have any experience with repair of your snowshoes outside your house?
        Could you please share your success/horror stories and repair tips.

        Comment

        Working...
        X