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HaBa & SSWR Finish, February 13

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  • HaBa & SSWR Finish, February 13

    One of the things about winter hiking which keeps me interested is that every year is different. This year a prominent feature was the frequent below zero °F temperatures. The low point was January 7 when Neil, Alistair and I headed out for Redfield, Cliff, and Colden. The temperature at the HPIC was around -30°F. Really. As the weeks went on, I almost assumed that hikes would start around 0°F, if not continue all day. It was that kind of year.

    I usually hike Haystack-Basin-Saddleback as a group but the snow last week followed by rain and warm weather over the weekend made me consider climbing the cliffs on Saddleback unwise. There was no way to know, and I didnÂ’t want to get there and find out it was a technical ice climb beyond my ability. There was a serious injury and rescue there the week before. So Monday, Feb. 12, I enjoyed a trip to Saddleback via the Orebed trail on a mostly frozen hard trail.

    I set out for Ha-Ba from the Garden at 7 a.m. You guessed it, the temperature was 0°F for most of the morning. I was surprised that the trail to Horse Hill was mostly hard-packed by hikers (and the weather). None of the usual trailbreaking in knee-deep snow. I got a big surprise at the view of the ice covering Little Haystack and Haystack, glistening in the morning sun. I was following recent tracks, maybe from the day before, which turned around at the foot of Little Haystack.

    I made it to the top of Little Haystack on snowshoes but saw that I would need to change to my Kahtoola K10 crampons for the descent. I carefully worked my way down to the little step and found the rocks mostly clear of ice but the sloping landing ledge was covered with snow. I reached down with my hiking pole and broke out a boot-sized spot which was trustworthy, then carefully lowered myself down onto it and quickly got to a safer location. For climbing Haystack I threaded my way away from the ice and toward the rock, snow and crust. The summit was completely covered by a glaze of clear ice but I was happy to be there. The descent was easier than I thought it would be, as I mostly followed my tracks. Even ascending the little step was easy. It was a great relief to have lunch at the trail junction.

    The descent to the Haystack brook col was easy in the crusty, consolidated snow and I was soon climbing Basin. The Shorey's trail and Basin trail were completely postholed, making snowshoeing difficult. I was happy to see that the postholers stopped right below the ladder. I guess they didn't like the looks of the ice at the top, or maybe they were just worn out. After what I went through on Haystack I barely noticed the ice on the summit of Basin, my 46th peak for the 2017-2018 season.

    Some statistics: This yearÂ’s round comprised 17 hiking days over a total of 55 days. Nine of the hikes were over 8 hours duration. Total distance was 286 miles. Total time was 135 hours. Total ascent was about 79,000 feet. These numbers are similar to past years. Here is the list:
    12/21/17 Giant and Rocky Peak Ridge
    12/24/17 Cascade and Porter
    12/27/17 Street and Nye
    12/30/17 Sawteeth, Gothics, Armstrong, Upper, Lower Wolf Jaw
    1/3/18 Donaldson, Emmons, Seward, Seymour
    1/7/18 Cliff, Redfield, Colden
    1/14/18 Macomb, Grace, South Dix, Hough, Dix
    1/16/18 Tabletop and Phelps
    1/18/18 Panther, Couchsachraga, Santanoni
    1/22/18 Whiteface and Esther
    1/24/18 Colvin, Blake, Nippetop, Dial
    1/28/18 Allen
    1/30/18 Wright, Algonquin, Iroquois, Marshall
    2/6/18 Big Slide
    2/9/18 Marcy, Skylight, Gray
    2/12/18 Saddleback-Orebed trail
    2/13/18 Haystack & Basin
    Icy summits

    Summit


    Hiking trail--see cairn right of center and my footprints
    Last edited by JoeCedar; 02-14-2018, 05:01 PM.

  • #2
    Congratulations Joe!

    Your fitness and experience make this challenging achievement seem easy but it's far from it. Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe this is your 9th consecutive Single-Season W46?

    'The mountains are calling' and you've definitely heard their call. Be well, Joe!
    Looking for Views!

    Comment


    • #3
      huge congrats, Joe! Inspiring and such an incredible achievement! Again and again
      46/46 as of August 1st, 2014!

      Comment


      • #4
        Congratulations on the achievement and the gorgeous photos.

        Comment


        • #5
          Congratulations!


          Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
          “The world is big and I want to have a good look at it before it gets dark.” John Muir

          ADK46: 46/46 9W
          CAT35: 13/35(39)
          WNH4K: 21/48

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Trail Boss
            Congratulations Joe!

            Your fitness and experience make this challenging achievement seem easy but it's far from it. Correct me if I'm wrong but I believe this is your 9th consecutive Single-Season W46?

            'The mountains are calling' and you've definitely heard their call. Be well, Joe!
            We all know you are good with numbers. I can’t correct you.


            Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by JoeCedar
              One of the things about winter hiking which keeps me interested is that every year is different. This year a prominent feature was the frequent below zero �F temperatures. The low point was January 7 when Neil, Alistair and I headed out for Redfield, Cliff, and Colden. The temperature at the HPIC was around -30�F. Really. As the weeks went on, I almost assumed that hikes would start around 0�F, if not continue all day. It was that kind of year.

              I usually hike Haystack-Basin-Saddleback as a group but the snow last week followed by rain and warm weather over the weekend made me consider climbing the cliffs on Saddleback unwise. There was no way to know, and I didn’t want to get there and find out it was a technical ice climb beyond my ability. There was a serious injury and rescue there the week before. So Monday, Feb. 12, I enjoyed a trip to Saddleback via the Orebed trail on a mostly frozen hard trail.

              I set out for Ha-Ba from the Garden at 7 a.m. You guessed it, the temperature was 0�F for most of the morning. I was surprised that the trail to Horse Hill was mostly hard-packed by hikers (and the weather). None of the usual trailbreaking in knee-deep snow. I got a big surprise at the view of the ice covering Little Haystack and Haystack, glistening in the morning sun. I was following recent tracks, maybe from the day before, which turned around at the foot of Little Haystack.

              I made it to the top of Little Haystack on snowshoes but saw that I would need to change to my Kahtoola K10 crampons for the descent. I carefully worked my way down to the little step and found the rocks mostly clear of ice but the sloping landing ledge was covered with snow. I reached down with my hiking pole and broke out a boot-sized spot which was trustworthy, then carefully lowered myself down onto it and quickly got to a safer location. For climbing Haystack I threaded my way away from the ice and toward the rock, snow and crust. The summit was completely covered by a glaze of clear ice but I was happy to be there. The descent was easier than I thought it would be, as I mostly followed my tracks. Even ascending the little step was easy. It was a great relief to have lunch at the trail junction.

              The descent to the Haystack brook col was easy in the crusty, consolidated snow and I was soon climbing Basin. The Shorey's trail and Basin trail were completely postholed, making snowshoeing difficult. I was happy to see that the postholers stopped right below the ladder. I guess they didn't like the looks of the ice at the top, or maybe they were just worn out. After what I went through on Haystack I barely noticed the ice on the summit of Basin, my 46th peak for the 2017-2018 season.

              Some statistics: This year’s round comprised 17 hiking days over a total of 55 days. Nine of the hikes were over 8 hours duration. Total distance was 286 miles. Total time was 135 hours. Total ascent was about 79,000 feet. These numbers are similar to past years. Here is the list:
              12/21/17 Giant and Rocky Peak Ridge
              12/24/17 Cascade and Porter
              12/27/17 Street and Nye
              12/30/17 Sawteeth, Gothics, Armstrong, Upper, Lower Wolf Jaw
              1/3/18 Donaldson, Emmons, Seward, Seymour
              1/7/18 Cliff, Redfield, Colden
              1/14/18 Macomb, Grace, South Dix, Hough, Dix
              1/16/18 Tabletop and Phelps
              1/18/18 Panther, Couchsachraga, Santanoni
              1/22/18 Whiteface and Esther
              1/24/18 Colvin, Blake, Nippetop, Dial
              1/28/18 Allen
              1/30/18 Wright, Algonquin, Iroquois, Marshall
              2/6/18 Big Slide
              2/9/18 Marcy, Skylight, Gray
              2/12/18 Saddleback-Orebed trail
              2/13/18 Haystack & Basin
              Icy summits

              Summit


              Hiking trail--see cairn right of center and my footprints
              Wow

              Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JoeCedar View Post
                2/12/18 Saddleback-Orebed trail
                2/13/18 Haystack & Basin
                That's a healthy back to back combo. Congratulations Joe! Plenty of time left . . .

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by DougV
                  That's a healthy back to back combo. Congratulations Joe! Plenty of time left . . .
                  I liked the Haystack weather on the 13th and didn’t want to finish on Saddleback later. Besides, SB is just a 1/2 day hike. I had 1/2 day to rest up.

                  You really helped me get started for Marcy...skiing up on my snowshoes.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Congratulations Joe! You don't really know until you're done, so another one complete, and early! That Adirondack cold is an advantage for the snow, but it is cold, so its a cause for concern, also.

                    The Adirondacks know how to do winter.
                    I might be kidding...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      It's always interesting to watch Joe go about the business of knocking off a SS46W. I even got to watch close up on a couple of his hikes!
                      Congratulations!
                      Project-100: 100 peaks, one winter. https://project100singlewinter.wordpress.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Fantastic work my friend! Sad I couldn't join you this year.
                        ADK 46/46W, Grid 237/552
                        Photos & Stuff

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Joe's photo, of the south face of Little Haystack, is like trick photography. It makes the saddle look awfully close. In fact, he has already ascended a significant height above it. I'll hazard a guess he's very close to where the trail changes direction and makes a sharp turn to the west.

                          Click image for larger version  Name:	8p438zT.jpg Views:	1 Size:	342.8 KB ID:	484078

                          Little Haystack - south face (full-sized image).
                          Looking for Views!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Right again, Trail Boss. It was the first place I was comfortable stopping and I was able to turn around and take a deep breath of relief. The picture looks directly down the trail section you show as top to bottom. Just to the right of the cairn and below is the famous step.

                            I didn't mention in the report that I left my snowshoes on top of LH, thinking I would not need them, as I looked up at the ice fields and rock. Well, I fell into spruce traps almost to my waist getting across the little col. Once up on the Haystack slope all I could think of was a safe route and making every step count.

                            I was playing with the altimeter software and found that the final ascent of Haystack is a whopping 375 feet--seems like it is a lot more. From the trail junction over Little Haystack is about 200 feet.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Congratulations Joe! But what will you do for the remaining 34 days of winter? The complete works of John Le Carre on a Caribbean beach? Actually, if you start right away you could probably squeeze in another round...

                              Comment

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