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See-more 10.28

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  • See-more 10.28

    Couldn't miss the probable last chance to get in a little bit of hiking before the weather turns. I wanted mileage without much elevation gain because this summer has been more walking than hiking and I didn't want to bonk with such limited daylight.

    Seymour seemed to fit the bill so I printed off maps and set the alarm for 4:00. This was my first trip to Corey's road which was in good shape; very dry and had some pretty first light views on Stony Creek Pond. I saw a deer by the first few camps that was probably glad that it wasn't a few miles southeast; some young men in full camo getup were setting out from one of the pull-offs further down the road.

    The parking lot was more than half full when I pulled in at 7:30. A group of 4 young men and a dog arrived just after I did; they were parling francais. I signed in and off I went, officially started walking at 7:35. The trail was lovely and mostly dry with amazingly little elevation gain. 9:17 marked progress at Blueberry Lean-to which had two packs hanging but their hikers were apparently off for the day. At 9:37 I arrived at the carin marking the beginning of the Seymour path. The first several minutes of the trail were fairly level with lots of leaf cover obscuring the footbed but a keen eye made following other footsteps fairly simple with the exception of an exceptional mud wallow that was found about 0.2 miles up the path.

    The trail gradually became steeper and steeper until it could hardly get any steeper with a fairly continuous section of wet narrow slabs. The lack of deciduous trees made trail finding very simple but the steep sections were quite tricky and wet. I gained the ridge after one final steep section and enjoyed the much flatter ridge walk with occasional steep area, running across my first fellow hiker of the day on his way down. Reaching the main summit and following the trail to the left, I found the summit sign and took a picture. I could see the main high peaks to the East and the Santas to the South through the stunted trees, however the bright sunshine didn't quite make up for the fierce wind and lack of clear views. I headed back west to the view ledge which was less sunny but more protected and had fantastic views West and North.

    I ate and relaxed for a few, took photos and made my way down to the large perched boulder below. Seward's NE flank looked impressive with a dozen scattered open rock faces.

    I made my way carefully down the upper steep sections and started to pick up the pace after the steep section. I ran into 2 young men almost to the bottom of the slabs then a group of 5 about 20 minutes later. I was attacked by a small dead spruce tree that stood in the midst of a small mud bog. I must have stepped on its root system but the rest of the tree was not anchored so the trunk accelerated toward my head and poked me in the ear with a dead branch stub.

    I believe I found the deepest part of the large, exceptional mud hole near the bottom of the path. Just above sock-height on my right foot.

    I found myself back on the main trail at 12:48 and knew from my timing earlier that I could plan for 2 hours back to the car. 2 hours later I found my prediction to have been accurate to the minute.

    Great hike, great weather and thanks to all of you that write here, post gps tracks and maps and do trail work. It was obvious that some discrete trail maintenance had occurred on the path.

    21/46 (and 60/115)

  • #2
    The trail gradually became steeper and steeper until it could hardly get any steeper with a fairly continuous section of wet narrow slabs.

    Ah yes, this would be the section I dubbed a 'steep little bugger of a trail'. Congrats on the climb, and thanks for the trip report!

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    • #3
      Hi,
      The mud wallow has been the subject in a number of trip reports. Glad you were able to experience it .
      And the climbing at it's steepest is as steep as anything in the 46.
      Thanks for the report.
      Don

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      • #4
        Originally posted by greenmountaingoat View Post
        ...I was attacked by a small dead spruce tree that stood in the midst of a small mud bog. I must have stepped on its root system but the rest of the tree was not anchored so the trunk accelerated toward my head and poked me in the ear with a dead branch stub. ...
        I recall a similar tree in the midst of that mud wallow you described at 0.2 miles. It leaned towards me at an angle directly related to the pressure applied on its roots. However, I didn't get the ear-canal inspection you did!

        I think we could fill an entire thread with strange little anecdotes about branches and roots seemingly engineered for invasive inspection of our tender parts or precisely positioned to ding shins and noggins. My favorite are the "tag team" obstacles where you see and avoid one only to walk immediately and directly into another. Grrr!
        Last edited by Trail Boss; 10-31-2017, 12:02 AM.
        Looking for Views!

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        • #5
          I love your definition of "without much elevation"! Given that Seymour is a couple of thousand feet up, plus at least 2 or 3 hundred from the parking lot. And steep, as you described well. Clearly you belong on this list.

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          • #6
            Great report! I enjoyed Seymour more than I had expected, since I had heard that it was quite steep and challenging, but it wouldn't be the Adirondacks without a bit of climbing, right? Sounds like you picked a good choice for what you had in mind.
            We don't stop playing because we get old; we get old because we stop playing ~ Satchel Paige

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