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The end of the mud season?

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  • The end of the mud season?

    When should I expect the end of the mud season?
    Should the first week of June be post mud season?
    When should I expect completely melted spine up there?

    I am supposed to be back East and first week of June is supposed to be available.
    So I would like to use this opportunity to come to ADK.

  • #2
    Mud season end? This is the Adirondacks... they are made of mud!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by mbowler View Post
      Mud season end? This is the Adirondacks... they are made of mud!
      Mbowler, my question is about this mud season:

      http://visitadirondacks.com/recreati...ing-mud-season

      http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9198.html

      http://www.adirondackalmanack.com/20...ud-season.html

      https://www.northcountrypublicradio....ing-mud-season

      Comment


      • #4
        I think you'll be safely out of the (spring) mud season by June.

        Your question made we think of whether DEC has ever announced the end of the Spring Mud Season. Probably not.

        Here is a link from ADK with their take on mud season. I think the practical date coincides with the Victoria Day weekend.
        https://www.adk.org/mud-season-adiro...-fifth-season/

        Don

        Comment


        • Trail Boss
          Trail Boss commented
          Editing a comment
          Ditto. Never seen an official "Mud Season is over" notice.

          ... 'cuz we all know it goes away only after the ground re-freezes ...

      • #5
        Originally posted by Yury View Post
        Mbowler, my question is about this mud season:

        http://www.dec.ny.gov/outdoor/9198.html
        I don't see anything on the DEC's site about mud season yet. I still only see the 'spikes and snowshoes above 3,500 feet' warning. Am I missing it?

        And if they haven't declared it yet (probably because of the lingering snow) does anyone here think it will be in effect beyond Memorial Day? I would suspect that the mad rush of uninformed hikers on and beyond Memorial Day make it impossible to extend it, but I'm not sure what has happened in past years.


        (FYI: mbowler was using humor. It's an American thing. )
        ADK 46/46W, Grid 235/552
        Photos & Stuff

        Comment


        • #6
          while the DEC did not issue a "mud season is over" press release that i know of, i believe that they removed the mud season advisory from their high peaks trail condition page on their june 9 update last year, june 18 in 2015.

          timing the mud season announcement seems to be lose / lose for the DEC. put it out too early and people scoff because high elevation trails will still have snow or ice. too late and some trails will be dry and people don't take the announcement seriously because they see/hear of some dry trails.

          Comment


          • #7
            I dunno 'bout Mud Season but, based on a recent hike to Whiteface and Esther, it's currently "Running/Standing Water and Slush Season". Undoubtedly the right conditions for the formation of mud.
            Looking for Views!

            Comment


            • #8
              Right now, bushwhacking below 3000' elevation is the ticket. No snow, slush or mud, still no bugs and mostly no leaves. Time to head for that obscure destination that you never have time to visit during the "high season."

              Comment


              • #9
                Our peaks aren't quite as lofty but the tradition in Vermont is that our bigger peaks are closed until Memorial Day. I just did a bit of research and it seems our policy is flexible:
                Last edited by greenmountaingoat; 05-09-2017, 01:42 PM. Reason: Edit- that link isn't working the way I though it would. Go to the drop down "things to do" menu item "hiking" and there's lots of info on mud season hikes that are open.

                Comment


                • #10
                  DEC issues the yearly mud season advisory:
                  http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/110172.html

                  mildly interesting things to note:
                  - it was released on a wednesday this year. these updates and the high peaks trail conditions are typically put out thursdays.
                  - like last year (but unlike the years before that) the projected end of the advisory is condition based and not time based. ie, "until high elevation trails have dried and hardened." and not "until early/mid june"
                  - ampersand is still included as an alternative, despite being well above 2500 ft

                  Comment


                  • gebby
                    gebby commented
                    Editing a comment
                    This is going to complicate the 46er's spring meeting as far as hikes that weekend!

                  • bfinan0
                    bfinan0 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    As long as there isn't a rule that peaks during mud season don't count...

                • #11
                  Originally posted by greatexpectations View Post
                  DEC issues the yearly mud season advisory:
                  http://www.dec.ny.gov/press/110172.html

                  mildly interesting things to note:
                  - it was released on a wednesday this year. these updates and the high peaks trail conditions are typically put out thursdays.
                  - like last year (but unlike the years before that) the projected end of the advisory is condition based and not time based. ie, "until high elevation trails have dried and hardened." and not "until early/mid june"
                  - ampersand is still included as an alternative, despite being well above 2500 ft
                  I'm not doubting you.
                  I went to the referenced link and copied it below.
                  I do not see the mention of "until early/mid june"
                  Perhaps this is a living document
                  Don


                  For Release: Wednesday, May 10, 2017
                  DEC Issues Muddy Trail Advisory for Adirondack High Peaks
                  Hikers Should Temporarily Avoid High Elevation Trails
                  As a new season of outdoor hiking and recreation on public lands in the Adirondacks approaches, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) urges hikers to be cautious and postpone hikes on trails above 2,500 feet until high elevation trails have dried and hardened.
                  Spring conditions are present throughout the state and the lower elevations of the Adirondacks. However, backcountry trails in the highest elevations are still covered in slowly melting ice and snow. Steep trails with thin soils can become a mix of ice and mud as the ice melts and frost leaves the ground, making the trails slippery and vulnerable to erosion by hikers.
                  DEC asks hikers to help avoid damage to hiking trails and sensitive high elevation vegetation by avoiding trails above 2,500 feet, particularly high elevation trails in the Dix, Giant, and High Peaks Wilderness areas in the northern Adirondacks. Please avoid the following trails until trail conditions improve:
                  „h High Peaks Wilderness Area - all trails above 2,500 feet; where wet, muddy, snow conditions still prevail, specifically: Algonquin, Colden, Feldspar, Gothics, Indian Pass, Lake Arnold Cross-Over, Marcy, Marcy Dam - Avalanche - Lake Colden, which is extremely wet, Phelps Trail above John Brook Lodge, Range Trail, Skylight, Wright, and all "trail-less" peaks.
                  „h Dix Mountain Wilderness Area - all trails above Elk Lake and Round Pond
                  „h Giant Mountain Wilderness Area - all trails above Giant's Washbowl, "the Cobbles," and Owls Head.
                  Hikers are advised to only use trails at lower elevations as these trails usually dry soon after snowmelt and traverse deeper, less erosive soils. DEC suggests the following alternative trails for hiking, subject to weather conditions:
                  „h High Peaks Wilderness:
                  „h Ampersand Mountain
                  „h Mt. VanHoevenberg
                  „h Mt. Jo
                  „h Giant Mt. Wilderness:
                  „h Giant's Washbowl
                  „h Roaring Brook Falls
                  „h Owl's Head Lookout
                  „h Hurricane Mountain Wilderness
                  „h The Crows
                  „h Hurricane Mountain from Rt 9N
                  „h Jay Mountain Wilderness
                  „h Jay Mountain
                  „h McKenzie Mt. Wilderness:
                  „h Baker Mountain
                  „h Haystack Mountain
                  „h McKenzie Mountain
                  „h Saranac Lakes Wild Forest:
                  „h Panther Mountain
                  „h Scarface Mountain
                  „h Floodwood Mountain
                  DEC's website contains information on backcountry conditions in the Adirondacks

                  Comment


                  • bfinan0
                    bfinan0 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    I think greatexpectations meant that in previous years there used to be a date and it would say until early June, or until mid-June, not this year's "until high elevation trails have dried and hardened"

                • #12
                  Originally posted by Hear the Footsteps View Post

                  I'm not doubting you.
                  I went to the referenced link and copied it below.
                  I do not see the mention of "until early/mid june"
                  Perhaps this is a living document
                  Don
                  bfinan's comment is correct, my apologies if i was unclear. looking back at my post i agree my wording was a little clunky.

                  for 2013 (and maybe earlier?) through 2015 the mud season announcement included a rough end date somewhere in june. this year (and last) the end of the season is listed as condition based, not time based. i felt it was worth mentioning as i have seen comments recently criticizing the mud season concept because of the lack of an "end of season" announcement or firm end date in the initial announcement.

                  Comment


                  • Hear the Footsteps
                    Hear the Footsteps commented
                    Editing a comment
                    thanks .............

                    A comment requires at least 10 characters so original reason for the dots ........

                • #13
                  It does happen to be particularly muddy this year. At least in the context of your average spring melt season. It's been rather rainy. There were decent accumulations of snow this winter. It's just kinda soupy and/or slushy out there right now depending on where exactly you are.

                  Will the terrain in question thaw, dry, and firm before the busy May holiday weekends? It's hard to tell but if conditions persist as they have up to this point it is going to be a sloppy couple of weekends for a lot of users. Let's hope it at least warms and dries out some over the next few weeks so at least it won't be cold and wet in addition to the mud. One thing we can be sure of is that once the respective holiday weekends arrive, the throngs of users will be there on cue.
                  Adopt a natural resource. Give back.

                  Comment


                  • #14
                    Originally posted by greatexpectations View Post
                    ... as i have seen comments recently criticizing the mud season concept because of the lack of an "end of season" announcement or firm end date in the initial announcement.
                    You rang?

                    Indeed, they've issued no press releases to announce the end of the mud advisory. Instead, the end date is approximated in the original release or, this year, with a bit of hand-waving "when the trails have dried and hardened" (a nice Adirondack-style substitute for "when hell freezes over").

                    ​BTW, I noticed the Adirondack Almanack embellishes the DEC's mud advisory with:
                    ... The Adirondack 46ers bylaws require members to follow DEC recommendations.
                    What's the dog-whistle there? Aspiring 46ers can't count a 4K hiked during "Mud Season"? OK, sure, why not. So when does this mud advisory end so the peaks will count? When the trails have "dried and hardened". I'm not sure how one discovers this criteria is met, to the DEC's satisfaction, unless they formally announce it.
                    Looking for Views!

                    Comment


                    • gebby
                      gebby commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Ahhhh, but there's the rub. It is a DEC "advisory" not a "recommendation". I'm sure that there are those who will feel that gives just enough wiggle room to hike without feeling they are violating any bylaw.

                    • Trail Boss
                      Trail Boss commented
                      Editing a comment
                      Very lawyerly wordsmithing there! I'm not sure there's a whole lot of daylight between advise and recommend .. but I'm not a lawyer.

                      To be clear, it's the Adirondack Almanack's spin and not the ADK 46ers. I've seen nothing on their site specific to the mud advisory.

                    • gebby
                      gebby commented
                      Editing a comment
                      I view the words as synonymous. I'm not looking to hike any High Peaks during mud season though.

                  • #15
                    Interesting that it's called "mud season" and that the advisory/recommendation calls for remaining below 2500' this year- it's usually 3000', yet suggests peaks such as Ampersand and Hurricane. A lot of, maybe even most of the bad mud that I have encountered is actually below 2500'. One of the worst stretches of mud I can recall was on the Van Ho between Marcy Dam and the HPIC. it was ankle deep for long sections. There were also a lot of hikers and to their credit most went right through it. The other very bad section was on Calamity Brook. When I returned to both trails later in the season they were fine with no traces of the mud wallows or signs of erosion. Other examples of bad trails are the Blueberry Footpath and the Bradley Pond Trail.

                    These sorts of inconsistencies between reality and the mixed message don't help with compliance or understanding. I think the main problem with mud patches in any season is that people walk around the section. As has been said, this is particularly bad early in the growing season with new growth getting underway.
                    1111111111

                    Comment


                    • gebby
                      gebby commented
                      Editing a comment
                      The section you mentioned is where I've seen the worst, deepest mud ever on the Van Ho trail when we did the Macs and looped back along the lake. A real mud wallow. Tromping through the middle, the mud came mid-calf! It had still felt like winter up top!
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