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Jan 7 1998 Ice Storm

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  • Jan 7 1998 Ice Storm

    There was post on VFFT about the big ice storm in January 1998. It is the 20th anniversary.

    I was in Europe, the Netherlands, at the time and recall news footage of electric transmission towers in Canada being crushed by the weight of the ice. That was on the only North American station I could get which was MSNBC.

    There's still signs of the storm I can see through Cascade Lakes - that's the Birch trees stripped of all branches.

    I also recall visiting Montreal in years close to 1998 and seeing picture books about the ice storm in book stores.

    Anybody have any other recollections about this?

  • #2
    I remember the storm well.

    I was living in Glens Falls at the time, and that week I was taking a group of employees to another one of the company's facilities in Massachusetts. When we left, there was about a half inch of ice on everything, but it quickly melted, as we were just south of the really heavily iced area. On TV while in Massachusetts I heard of the unfolding ice storm, with all the broken trees and downed power lines, and the run on generators that exhausted the supply in the entire Northeast. A friend at work traveled to his parents farm in Plattsburgh later in the week to help them get through the aftermath. He reported that in some areas that "100% of the trees were affected," missing tops or many branches.

    This storm was the 2nd of three major events in a short period that changed the landscape. The first event was the derecho of July 16, 1995; then the 1998 ice storm; and then Hurricane Floyd in September 1999.

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    • #3
      And don't forget back to back 100-year floods in 1995 and 1996, the forest fire on Noonmark in 1999, a record three blizzards in March 2001, and finally a magnitude 5.2 earthquake in April 2002.

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      • #4
        Nearly every birch in my neighborhood was killed in that ice storm and some of the trunks are still falling to this day.

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        • #5
          http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montre...1998-1.4469977
          8000m 0/14

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          • #6
            Originally posted by tgoodwin View Post
            And don't forget back to back 100-year floods in 1995 and 1996, the forest fire on Noonmark in 1999, a record three blizzards in March 2001, and finally a magnitude 5.2 earthquake in April 2002.
            I remember 1999 too and the fire there on The Burn. And the year after before the Aspen filled and continuous views as you walked across. And there was also a fire on (maybe) French Mountain Lake George you can see from I87. One day driving home I saw they had a crew from jail up there helping in orange color coveralls.

            In 2001 too. I was big into skiing at the time and the snow was, as they say, Epoch. Probably the last great snow year even to present day. And riding the chair at Sugarbush and seeing people skiing off a chute on Nancy Hanks peak. And talking to a local and hearing 'were skiing were we've never skied before' and thigh deep snow at Mad River Glen and Burlington getting a years worth of snow just in March....the three blizzards.

            Don

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            • #7
              Yes, skiing where no one had ever skied before. I skied where no one had skied before or has skied since when in early April 2001 I and my two sons hiked up to the top of the Noonmark burn area and skied that then totally open slope. The trees had just started coming back, but the snow the previous month had them completely covered. By the next year those trees were considerably taller and we never had that much snow again.

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